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The 2021 OTF Weight Loss Intention & Mutual Support Thread

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    #26
    I know that one beer etc wipes out the effect of 30 minutes running (ir something like that; the figures are not meant to be exact) but I find exercise has a psychological benefit as well, in that the better you feel about your body, the less likely you are to spoil the benefits by over-eating.

    I'm lucky in that I have time to work out, live in a bike-friendly city and that the gym is a minute's walk away. I hesitate to offer advice as wherever I suggest is nothing new, but as far as my own still overweight body is concerned I barely eat before lunchtime. (There's actually no medical evidence for the old dictum of "Have breakfast like a king. .etc").

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      #27
      One week in - weight loss of 5 1/2lbs. A bit more exercise than normal over the week, just more walking (which despite lockdown as I live on the edge of a village isn't a problem for me or others), no late night snacking and only 1 glass of wine in the week. Going to bed deliberately early - around 21:00 - 21:30 and then reading for an hour has been a real boon; it's stopped me from watching TV later in the evening, which usually means snacking and drinking. Certainly feel much better in the mornings.

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        #28
        Ok, I ate healthily yesterday and weighed myself this morning in just pyjamas which is a slightly less terrifying (but still highest ever) weight of 72.2kg, which still puts me in the BMI obese category. I need to lose just .2kg to get into the overweight category, or 12.1kg to get back into the healthy weight category.

        In stones and pounds, I'm currently 11 stone 5 pounds, and need to get down to a maximum of 9 stone 6 pounds, but I actually feel healthiest at about 8 stone 10 pounds. I need to lose at least 1 stone 12 pounds to get back into the healthy category.

        When focussing on it I can consistently lose 1-2 pounds or 0.5-1kg per week. It is 12 weeks until Easter, so getting back into the healthy weight category by then is a bit ambitious. May half term is in 20 weeks. More realistic, so I'll aim to be in the healthy BMI category by then.

        We've just had a food delivery. All healthy stuff, no junk, so let's see how I get on this week.

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          #29
          How about organising an Olympic Games for your family in your garden? Get the kids occupied and shagged out as well as jumping around yourself?

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            #30
            Originally posted by Sporting View Post
            How about organising an Olympic Games for your family in your garden? Get the kids occupied and shagged out as well as jumping around yourself?
            Well we've ordered a trampoline. I suspect that constructing it will be plenty of exercise in and of itself.

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              #31
              Down 0.1kg this morning to 72.1kg. I know I should weigh myself weekly, not daily, but I'm very much an all or nothing person. If I'm weighing myself, I'm weighing myself daily. Another 0.1kg to go to get myself out of the obese category. The trampoline has been built so I'll have a go on that later today.

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                #32
                I weigh myself twice a week (usually Wednesday and Saturday mornings) and thought that today's numbers would be down, after what I thought had been a good few days on the food and exercise front.

                Sadly, no change.

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                  #33
                  71.8kg this morning (11 stone 4 pounds). Down 0.3kg. Am no longer officially obese, merely very overweight now. Interim goal: to be under 70kg by the end of January, preferably down to 69.8kg which is just under 11 stone.

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                    #34
                    I've done the first couch to 5k session with Michael Johnson. It feels much better doing something with a plan rather than just going out and running as long as I can before walking for a bit. It's also nice to have Johnson tell you you're doing great.

                    I did something to the lower inside of my left knee a few days ago. I don't know what, it's a new type of pain, it's pretty much gone away now but on the day after I struggled to put weight on it. I'm not sure what the alternative aerobic exercise is though.

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                      #35
                      71.8kg again today. No change up or down. I count that as a consolidated loss.

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                        #36
                        I'm 111kg now so down 16kg since September, still in obese territory but BMI down to 32 so overweightness is in sight. Christmas knocked my routine and structure out but managed to keep it to a weight plateau rather than piling weight on. Stress of returning lockdown and (thankfully averted) loss of childcare lead to some stress eating episodes too so I'm not at the 1kg per week rate that I was previously. 2 months to due date for our second child. Realistic target is to be 105kg at that point.

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                          #37
                          Thiking of BMI, I'm now in a somewhat ironic position. My BMI* is right on the cusp between 29.6 and 30.2 depending on the time of day I weigh myself.

                          In around a month or two, the state is going to open up vaccinations to people who have comorbidities. One of which is technical obesity and a BMI over 30.

                          I am now in a position where it might be healthier for me, personally, to not lose a couple of extra pounds, because I might get vaccinated earlier if I don't lose the weight.

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                            #38
                            Lowest today since I started weighing just over a year ago. My wife's delighted.

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                              #39
                              Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
                              Thiking of BMI, I'm now in a somewhat ironic position. My BMI* is right on the cusp between 29.6 and 30.2 depending on the time of day I weigh myself.

                              In around a month or two, the state is going to open up vaccinations to people who have comorbidities. One of which is technical obesity and a BMI over 30.

                              I am now in a position where it might be healthier for me, personally, to not lose a couple of extra pounds, because I might get vaccinated earlier if I don't lose the weight.
                              Perverse rewards in action, there.

                              And you should weigh yourself first thing in the morning. Obviously. Preferably at pretty well the same time each time.

                              Comment


                                #40
                                Originally posted by Sporting View Post
                                I know that one beer etc wipes out the effect of 30 minutes running (ir something like that; the figures are not meant to be exact)
                                A 30 minute run will burn roughly 300 calories,* depending on how fast you go. And on how much you weigh. This is one situation where being heavier is actually a bit of a minor benefit - it means you burn more calories per minute or running. But 'wipes out the effect of' is a rather negatively loaded way of looking at it... (and 30 minutes run = 1 beer is also dependent on the beer as well, of course!)

                                * - or more like ~250 additional calories. Because there is often a double count going on with these sort of statements from fitness website and the like. Yes, if you are running for half-an-hour you will burn 300 calories or so. But if you are sitting in your armchair watching TV you instead for that period you would also burn 50 calories. That is the rate of energy expenditure that humans have simply to exist. [The later number is based on the recommended average daily intake of 2000kcal for a woman and 2500kcal for a man. So ~100kcal per hour, or ~50 per half-hour.]

                                However, that 30 minutes of running, if it is something people can do regularly, does provide a double benefit in a different way. Because if it is something done often it will drive your metabolic rate up. You must have all heard a slim young woman who is with friends and is eating something 'naughty' saying to her compadres something along the lines of "Oh, I'm lucky, I can get away with it as I've just got a fast metabolism". But she is eliding things when she plays it down like that. Namely that said young woman is highly likely doing a fair amount of exercise to have her fast metabolism. It's not actually luck at all.

                                The baseline (or basal) metabolic rate does vary per person on things like genetics, of course. And again height, weight and gender are significant factors. But BMR's don't change all that much between people on genetic grounds. A few dozen kcals maybe. The range it can vary by pales compared to the changes a person can make to their actual metabolic rate by the amount of exercise they are regularly doing. That can move the needle by several hundred calories.

                                For my own height/weight/gender, the difference in caloric needs between being 'inactive' and 'active' (as per the NHS) is supposedly ~400 kcal. And in my experimenting last year, it seemed that these numbers were about right. Due to the amount of deliberate exercise I do, I would be placed in the next category up from 'active' by the NHS - 'active' is 60-150 minutes of vigorous exercise per week and I get through more than that, usually 200+ minutes per week. And again, the self-experimentation said that was about right as I'm a 1m77 tall / 70 kilo male in his mid-40s, and my weight appears to be stable whilst consuming ~3000 kcal per day.

                                As Hot Pepsi noted, ~2000 kcal/day is not a lot by US standards. But 3000 is a fairly large amount by UK ones. But the key thing here is that my body doesn't appear to start to make adipose tissue until I've gone over the regular 3000kcal, even if I'm on a rest day. On rest days I do no exercising, but still consumed my usual amount of food (three full meals and a snack or thereabouts). And on quite a few occasions I've still found my weight had dropped the next morning despite not 'burning' 300 kcal with a run during the day. The effects of such exercise would appear, anecdotally, to spread itself out much more.

                                Comment


                                  #41
                                  Originally posted by Janik View Post
                                  A 30 minute run will burn roughly 300 calories,* depending on how fast you go. And on how much you weigh. This is one situation where being heavier is actually a bit of a minor benefit - it means you burn more calories per minute or running. But 'wipes out the effect of' is a rather negatively loaded way of looking at it... (and 30 minutes run = 1 beer is also dependent on the beer as well, of course!)

                                  * - or more like ~250 additional calories. Because there is often a double count going on with these sort of statements from fitness website and the like. Yes, if you are running for half-an-hour you will burn 300 calories or so. But if you are sitting in your armchair watching TV you instead for that period you would also burn 50 calories. That is the rate of energy expenditure that humans have simply to exist. [The later number is based on the recommended average daily intake of 2000kcal for a woman and 2500kcal for a man. So ~100kcal per hour, or ~50 per half-hour.]

                                  However, that 30 minutes of running, if it is something people can do regularly, does provide a double benefit in a different way. Because if it is something done often it will drive your metabolic rate up. You must have all heard a slim young woman who is with friends and is eating something 'naughty' saying to her compadres something along the lines of "Oh, I'm lucky, I can get away with it as I've just got a fast metabolism". But she is eliding things when she plays it down like that. Namely that said young woman is highly likely doing a fair amount of exercise to have her fast metabolism. It's not actually luck at all.

                                  The baseline (or basal) metabolic rate does vary per person on things like genetics, of course. And again height, weight and gender are significant factors. But BMR's don't change all that much between people on genetic grounds. A few dozen kcals maybe. The range it can vary by pales compared to the changes a person can make to their actual metabolic rate by the amount of exercise they are regularly doing. That can move the needle by several hundred calories.

                                  For my own height/weight/gender, the difference in caloric needs between being 'inactive' and 'active' (as per the NHS) is supposedly ~400 kcal. And in my experimenting last year, it seemed that these numbers were about right. Due to the amount of deliberate exercise I do, I would be placed in the next category up from 'active' by the NHS - 'active' is 60-150 minutes of vigorous exercise per week and I get through more than that, usually 200+ minutes per week. And again, the self-experimentation said that was about right as I'm a 1m77 tall / 70 kilo male in his mid-40s, and my weight appears to be stable whilst consuming ~3000 kcal per day.

                                  As Hot Pepsi noted, ~2000 kcal/day is not a lot by US standards. But 3000 is a fairly large amount by UK ones. But the key thing here is that my body doesn't appear to start to make adipose tissue until I've gone over the regular 3000kcal, even if I'm on a rest day. On rest days I do no exercising, but still consumed my usual amount of food (three full meals and a snack or thereabouts). And on quite a few occasions I've still found my weight had dropped the next morning despite not 'burning' 300 kcal with a run during the day. The effects of such exercise would appear, anecdotally, to spread itself out much more.
                                  Isn't it the case that the positive effects of a period of exercise on one's metabolism last for a relatively long time, 48 hours or so, which would allow you to take intermittent days off from intense activity but see no deterioration in your body's fat-burning performance?

                                  Comment


                                    #42
                                    That fits with what I have observed on myself. And it makes logical sense - the body will deposit unused calories as glycogen in the muscles in readiness for it being spent, as recent experience says that is required. But it won't keep it there for long before transferring it to it's longer term storage of adipose.

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