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  1. #76
    Ginger Yellow's Avatar
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    Then a few years later, they released Von Trier's The Kingdom in US theaters, showing all 4 hours with a 2 hour break. I was absolutely blown away.
    Weird. They just aired it as the TV show over here. Because that's what it was. Can't imagine it working very well as a movie. It definitely plays on the cliffhanger structure.

  2. #77

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    That Brooks piece is fascinating.
    What ursus said!

  3. #78
    Amor de Cosmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evariste Euler Gauss View Post
    What ursus said!
    if you can get hold of a copy Lulu in Hollywood (in which that Bogart essay appears) it's well worth picking up. Brooks was an unfailingly honest and perceptive writer (especially when it came to herself.) It's probably the best first person memoir of early Hollywood I've come across.

  4. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by Ginger Yellow View Post
    Weird. They just aired it as the TV show over here. Because that's what it was. Can't imagine it working very well as a movie. It definitely plays on the cliffhanger structure.
    It played like any binge watching series with cliffhangers. You say "OH SHIT" and watch the next one.

    It sucked sitting up close, because of those video lines, but in the back of the theatre it was great.

  5. #80
    Ginger Yellow's Avatar
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    Did they include those clips of von Trier after each episode?

  6. #81
    Bordeaux Education's Avatar
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  7. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
    if you can get hold of a copy Lulu in Hollywood (in which that Bogart essay appears) it's well worth picking up. Brooks was an unfailingly honest and perceptive writer (especially when it came to herself.) It's probably the best first person memoir of early Hollywood I've come across.
    As a companion to that, I highly recommend Gloria Swanson's very candid autobiography.

  8. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Ginger Yellow View Post
    Did they include those clips of von Trier after each episode?
    Von Trier's peace and rock/satan hand signs, credits, opening credits, all.

    If anything, it may have led to the Sopranos showing their first 2 episodes of season 3 in a theatre, Hollywood premier-style.

    Couldn't find any of the reviews from part 1, but here's a NY Times review of Part 2.

  9. #84
    Just to add another jewel to the old movie collection (if it hasn't been mentioned already), and that would be Dead of Night. Old as God, but still pretty impressive.

  10. #85

    I ought to report you to the Gnome Office
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    Quote Originally Posted by ian.64 View Post
    Just to add another jewel to the old movie collection (if it hasn't been mentioned already), and that would be Dead of Night. Old as God, but still pretty impressive.
    Writing as someone who gets creeped out by ventriloquist dummies, Dead of Night still packs a punch.

  11. #86
    Tramp The Dirt Down's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce series of Sherlock Holmes movies.

    Also some of Frank Capra's movies, particularly Lost Horizon, Mr Deeds, Meet John Doe.

  12. #87
    On the subject of old films, I recommend the "You Must Remember This" podcast by Karina Longworth, which thoroughly deserves the hype it has received. Her series on HUAC and the Blacklist was particularly well executed.

    On the website, the podcasts are downloadable on MP3 only up to a point. Then it's linked to iTunes (which has all the episodes). Podbean has the lot on their player and in downloadable MP3 format.

  13. #88

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    Recent films I've watched, all tremendous:

    The Third Man
    The Red Shoes
    400 Blows
    Jules and Jim

    Love those last 2 Truffaut films, they must've been so radical when they were released, but totally enjoyable, entertaining and worth it radical.

  14. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by jason voorhees View Post
    Both characters are trapped, Michael by his family, Lefty by his job. What hit me about Donnie Brasco the second time, was how the FBI was as dark a force for Donnie as Sonny Black's gang was for Lefty. In many ways, it serves as a template for The Wire, where the Greek Gods of those groups in power will torture the mortals that exist under them. Donnie and Lefty will discover love for each other, because they are workers trapped by more incompetent and obstinate overlords.
    You make an interesting comparison. I always subscribed to the more obvious belief that Donnie Brasco set the groundwork for that other titan of HBO television, by which I mean The Sopranos. Brasco presented the Mafia as a decaying force, and The Sopranos took that tone and ran with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by ian.64 View Post
    I'd chuck Sweet Smell of Success into the hat, too. It's a swagger of a movie with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis at the top of their games, the sharpest script, excellent photography and an Elmer Bernstein score worth having ears for. Directed by Alexander MacKendrick, who gave us The Ladykillers and - possibly another candidate for this thread - Whisky Galore.
    Sweet Smell of Success is in my personal top five, pretty much for the same reasons you mentioned. The stories about the script not being finished (and how the actors were rewriting scenes minutes before filming them) always amaze me, because the script is so tight and the dialogue is relentlessly back-and-forth.

    I know most of these have already been mentioned, but I'd say my other absolute favourites from the same rough period are:

    12 Angry Men
    The Guns of Navarone
    Lawrence of Arabia
    Vertigo
    North by Northwest
    The 400 Blows
    The Third Man
    Strangers on a Train
    Sunset Boulevard

  15. #90
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    Mrs Thistle and I watched Some Like It Hot tonight. Never seen it before. Really enjoyed it.

    I thought it was interesting how it showed the way men treated women, with the bum pinching and unwanted advances, bellhops letting themselves into girls rooms and so on.

    Also the first Marilyn Monroe film I've seen. I can see why she was such a star.

  16. #91
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    It’s just great. Still can’t believe that ending got through fifties Hollywood.

  17. #92
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    It stands up remarkably well doesn't it? It's one of those films where a director clearly has confidence in his actors' intelligence and doesn't step all over them. You can tell everyone involved had a real blast. Another one, from a couple of decades earlier, is Stage Door directed by the almost forgotten Gregory La Cava. La Cava, like Wilder, gave his predominately female cast freedom to ad lib, even though the script was by the renowned Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufmann. Ginger Rogers, Kate Hepburn, Gail Patrick and Lucille Ball are all scintillating. Catch if you can.

  18. #93
    Cal Alamein's Avatar
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    My son saw it for one of his college film classes and commented favorably.

    I listed it on the Top 10 Westerns thread, but finally got around to re-watching The Ox-Bow Incident. Just as good (and relevant) as last time viewed.

    75 minutes long - no pissing around.

  19. #94

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    can go along with most of those mentioned. Would Suggest

    "White Heat"
    "Green For Danger"
    "Oh Mr. Porter"
    "The Petrified Forest"
    "All Quiet On The Western Front"
    "Frankenstein" (James Whale film)
    "The Miracle Of Morgan's Creek"
    "The Lady Eve"
    "Pepe Le Moko"
    "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"

  20. #95
    Just to touch upon the name of James Wong Howe mentioned a while back on this thread, I recall seeing John Frankenheimer's Seconds on the telly years ago - it's an unsettling film, even for mainstream mid-60's American cinema - and noticed a particular effect Wong Howe used in a sequence where Rock Hudson's character gets overly drunk (and possible drugged - I can't remember all the details) and staggers around in all directions at a party. It's the effect where a camera is strapped to the actor and the sequence shows the actor remaining stock still in the centre of the image while everything else around him swirls and shakes almost kaleidoscopically. It's been used ever since in particular films and music videos (I remember Scorcese doing it in Mean Streets) and I'm wondering if Wong Howe originated that effect. Just curious.
    Last edited by ian.64; 09-07-2018 at 07:59.

  21. #96
    According to Empire magazine, the earliest example of that camera trick was Vincente Minelli's Madame Bovary back in 1949. Mystery solved. Carry on.

  22. #97
    Satchmo Distel's Avatar
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    Great book on the 1940s Hollywood film industry: City of Nets:

    https://www.amazon.com/CIty-Nets-Por...s=city+of+nets

  23. #98
    Oh yes. A book I've read more than once.

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