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Backpacks and blisters - the walking thread

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  • Sits
    replied
    OI'm pleased with that effort. I paid attention when I read Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee. Time I read it again I reckon.

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  • Cal Alamein
    replied
    Good work! All three are a possibility.

    But specifically in that area, years ago it would be folks from Jemez Pueblo, maybe some Zia.

    Apache are north of there, and Navajo are fair distance to the northeast.

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  • Sits
    replied
    That’s fantastic CA. Really though there needs to be a posse, on horseback, lined up along the far ridge in silhouette. Or maybe a big group of Apache. Feel free to correct my tribal guess. Navajo? Pueblo?

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  • Cal Alamein
    replied
    First big hike in a long while. Hiked in the Jemez Mountains to McCauley Springs. Not too crowded, very hot in the low 90s but still great to get out of town.

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  • Moonlight Shadow
    replied
    Well, as things stand there is bigger all to look forward too weather wise for my holiday. Things have taken a terrible turn alas...ah well, strolls by the sea and book reading on the cards. July has been a great advert for NOT holidaying in this country alas...

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  • Evariste Euler Gauss
    replied
    Have fun, MS! We head up on Friday, fingers crossed for several dry days and even a bit of sunshine. Main thing is not to have low cloud of course, so as to get the views from the tops - some bad memories of at least one trip to the Lakes with day after day of cloud cover down to 500m or so, which does rather depress the mood. (Making an effort to go metric there, I always naturally think of altitude in feet when in the Lakes, what with my old Wainwright guides and so on.)

    Somebody once said, and it makes sense geographically, is that Slovak is the one Slavonic language that puts you in position to be best understood in other Slavonic countries. Anecdotally, it seems to be true too. Slovaks understand Czech perfectly and can get by easily enough in Poland and down in the Baltic countries. Czechs and Poles don't seem to find it quite so easy.
    Interesting thanks jwba - how about with Ukrainian and Russian? I'm guessing not so much, as seeing things the other way round, with the benefit of my own Russian skills (admittedly a long way off top notch) I can't really understand more than a small portion of what people are saying - words rather than whole sentences - when I overhear folk out and about speaking other Slavonic languages (usually Polish I guess, just from the numbers-based likelihood). It does help a lot more with attempts to decipher written text though.

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  • Moonlight Shadow
    replied
    Clear weather in winter means generally a very cold night, them chaps must have had a few interesting nights up there....

    It's looking increasingly good for next weather wise for those of us holidaying in the Lakes District. At worse it the window of good weather will be Saturday to Tuesday but models are starting to show an extension of it...fingers crossed. We have decided to go there a day earlier so Big Hike number 1 will be on monday...

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  • jameswba
    replied
    Is that the hill visible above Bolton Wanderers' ground? I love the sky on those pics anyway.

    MS, some people sleep on Velky Rozsutec on New Year's Eve if the weather's clear and a good sunrise is likely. My neighbour and I have a tradition of going up every New Year's Eve too, but we usually start walking around 7am.

    EEG, yes and even the country names have only one letter different ; Slovensko (Slovakia), Slovinsko (Slovenia). A female Slovak is Slovenka, a female Slovene is Slovinka. A bit easier with males as a Slovak is Slovak(!), a Slovene is Slovinec.

    Somebody once said, and it makes sense geographically, is that Slovak is the one Slavonic language that puts you in position to be best understood in other Slavonic countries. Anecdotally, it seems to be true too. Slovaks understand Czech perfectly and can get by easily enough in Poland and down in the Baltic countries. Czechs and Poles don't seem to find it quite so easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Foot of Astaire's
    replied
    It's Winter Hill. Sits the reservoir there is pretty high up and with the wind blowing off the moors across the water, it creates a form of air conditioning where it's really not needed!

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  • Moonlight Shadow
    replied
    Where is it precisely? I can see a great big mast, the one on Holme Moss?

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  • Sits
    replied
    They're nice FoA. The water looks bloody cold.

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  • Foot of Astaire's
    replied

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  • Foot of Astaire's
    replied
    Dark skies over Northern England on today's walk

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    My father's family had a (to me) bizarre connection to their homeland, to the extent that they denied knowing the language and the part of the country from which they came. I have never been able to locate the ancestral village (I spent a day at the interior ministry in Prague back in the day trying to do so) nor whether any relatives still live there.

    My wife's family is the absolute opposite. A significant part of both her mother's and father's families still live in Slovenija and are doing very well. I visited once a year when we were living in Italy, and my wife and son usually went two or three times. Having grown up speaking the language at home, ms ursus is fluent, and our son knows a couple of hundred words (I knew maybe 50 at my peak, and have regressed since). We have even had a couple of Zoom calls with the Slovene part of the family during the pandemic (they were worried about us). They are both eligible for Slovene citizenship (I am not, nor am I eligible for either Slovak or Polish) and are going to redouble their efforts in that direction over the next twelve months.

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  • Evariste Euler Gauss
    replied
    Very good! Do you know either language, ursus? Have you visited ancestral locations at all (if it's OK to ask)?

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Consider the position of someone whose father came from a 100 percent Slovak family and who married into a family of very proud Slovenes who only emigrated in the 50s

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  • Evariste Euler Gauss
    replied
    Great photos thanks jameswba!

    Being a linguist (with a bit of a thing for Slavonic languages due to having studied Russian) I was intrigued by the sign at the top of the mountain attributed to the "Klub Slovenskych Turistov". That prompted me to do a quick bit of online dictionary searching re English to Slovakian translations of "Slovakian" and "Slovenian", and the upshot is that I now feel slightly more tolerant of people who confuse Slovakia with Slovenia after learning that the Slovak for "Slovakian" is "Slovensky"! (Slovak for "Slovenian" is apparently "Slovincina" with a v shaped diacritic on the c.)

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  • Sits
    replied
    That looks fantastic; lovely photos.

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  • Moonlight Shadow
    replied
    Originally posted by jameswba View Post
    Magnificent waterfalls there. I got up early today to hike up Velky Rozsutec, my favourite local mountain. Well, I thought it was early, but I met two guys who'd been at the top as the sun rose.
    Get a bivi bag and sleep at the top, guaranteed to be on top for sunrise before anybody!

    Lovely place btw, you are fortunate to live nearby!

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  • jameswba
    replied
    Mid 20s in town, perhaps 15 degrees on the summit. There was a lovely breeze higher up too, so never oppressive.

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  • S. aureus
    replied
    I'm jealous. What's the temperature like there?

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  • jameswba
    replied
    Stoh, the neighbouring peak. It has an almost identical altitude to Rozsutec, but almost nothing else in common with it. They make a great contrast pictured together from afar.

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  • jameswba
    replied
    The view of the main ridge of the Mala Fatra range.

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  • jameswba
    replied
    At the top ; the obligatory crooked sign. No self-respecting Slovak mountain can be without one of these

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  • jameswba
    replied
    From higher up.

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