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Backpacks and blisters - the walking thread

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  • Moonlight shadow
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  • Moonlight shadow
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  • Moonlight shadow
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  • Moonlight shadow
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    Posing on Crib Goch....

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  • Moonlight shadow
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  • Nocturnal Submission
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    Very nice. A lovely tribute and some stunning photos.

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  • Moonlight shadow
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    Yeah, a lovely dedication to a man that seemed to be the kind of chap that gave so much to the hiking community without any desire to exploit it. Rare.

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  • Sits
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    That’s lovely ad hoc.

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  • ad hoc
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    Possibly indirectly. I think it became his nickname, partly because he was a fan of Hungarian 70s/80s rock group "Hobo Blues Band" and partly because of the part of the definition of hobo that implies wanderer/living to some extent off the grid.

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  • Nefertiti2
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    A lovely commemoration for what seems like a lovely guy, ad hoc.

    does Hobo have the Woody Guthrie connotations in Romania that it does here?

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  • ad hoc
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    My brother in law, known as Hobo to his friends, was one of those people who simply loved being out and experiencing the beauty of Transylvania. Every weekend, every holiday, he hiked and biked all over the place. He had a fairly low paid job, basically in the land registry mapping people's property and so on, but it was perfect for him. He loved making maps anyway, on his weekend trips, noting down all the things that he found as he explored the mountains. He would go up to some point in the hills, and start exploring, coming across springs, world war I trenches, even a roman road at one time. He not only went hiking himself, but loved it so much that he would mark trails for others, and put up signs. He collaborated with map makers and shared what he found (We own a number of the best maps that are available of Transylvania, and most of them mention his name as a collaborator). He volunteered at times for the mountain rescue team, and was always available to help people. Ten years ago this month, he was up in the Fagaras mountains, which is Romania's highest range, setting up a checkpoint for "Carpathian Adventure", which is a kind of teamwork/orienteering race organised by Outward Bound. He felt unwell, with a really bad headache and sickness, and his best friend called in the mountain rescue team. For reasons I won't go into here, it took then 36 hours before they brought a helicopter in and got him to hospital. Turned out he'd had an aneurysm. Two operations filled weeks later he died. He was 38. Anyway, this weekend, by way of a memorial and a kind of pilgrimage we (my family and the guy he was with that day, and his family too), hiked up to his favourite spot, among many places he loved. There is a memorial there to him, that his mountain hiking friends had erected. The last time we were there in fact was the day that it was put up and dedicated. Anyway, I just wanted to share that and put up some photos.


    he will have made these trail marks



    Signs at the summit. The green ones are ones he made.



    The memorial - this is a kind of locally popular totem pole which is hand carved in wood - you find them in cemeteries usually



    His name on the memorial



    Difficult to tell, but this is an old WWI trench he uncovered, from when the retreating Hungarian army were digging in against the advancing Romanian troops




    A couple of views from the top. It's not especially high at 1080 metres (my older daughter had been to the top of Romania's second highest peak at 2535 metres the day before), but the views (on a clear day) stretch for at least 100km.

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  • Sits
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    Great work Paul and lovely weather, though you’d probably prefer a bit cooler. I imagine November will oblige.

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  • Paul S
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    Yep, quite right, taken close to the radar station. A stunning day but you have to do at least ten combes (deep valleys) between Hartland and Bude and I am now exhausted. That's my first week on the SWCP completed, I'll be back in November to do another one.

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  • Nocturnal Submission
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    I'm rather proud to say that I've pinpointed Paul, or the area in his photo, to the Hartland Cornwall Heritage Coast, just south of Morwenstow.

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  • Sporting
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    Maybe it's a photo quiz.

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  • Sits
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    Nice. Where are you now Paul?

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  • Paul S
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  • San Bernardhinault
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    Are you staying in huts, MS? The Italian huts are great. Much better than the French or even Swiss ones.

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan
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    Originally posted by Paul S View Post
    Then onto Westwood Ho! which I have always wanted to visit as it is the only place in Europe with an exclamation mark in its name.
    "Westward". And what about Fucking Leeds!?
    Last edited by Rogin the Armchair fan; 18-07-2019, 20:25.

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  • Lang Spoon
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    That looks really lovely.

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  • Paul S
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    Bideford to Clovelly today past the Appledore shipyard which only closed four months ago. Then onto Westwood Ho! which I have always wanted to visit as it is the only place in Europe with an exclamation mark in its name. I finished the day in Clovelly Where a sign told me I was 99 miles from my start point in Minehead. Clovelly is incredible, here's a picture of the main street:

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  • Moonlight shadow
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    Indeed, a recent one too, thanks to climate change....

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  • Nocturnal Submission
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    Cheers.

    I presume that's a glacial lake, given the colour?

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  • Moonlight shadow
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    Ibex, they just turned up all of the sudden. We saw one earlier which must have been the advance party. A few marmots about, goats, sheep and donkeys belonging to a small farm (at 2500m altitude...)

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  • ursus arctos
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    Chamois or another type of mountain goat, methinks

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