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Backpacks and blisters - the walking thread

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  • Sits
    replied
    My Dad was always late everywhere. When he took my brother and me across that causeway the tide was just about in by the time we reached the Mount and we all got wet feet and flares.

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  • slackster
    replied
    Your current trip takes me back a bit, Paul S. Backpacked the Cornish Coast Path clockwise (well, Falmouth to Bude) back in 1979 after A levels. Mixture of wild camping, campsites and a couple of hostels. It was summer, mind, so warmer. But being British summer there were still a fair amount of wet, windy days. We took our time and stopped for a few breaks, so it took us almost a month.

    I really need to plan another long distance walk soon - fancy Wainwright’s Coast to Coast, the Lycian Way in Turkey, and (at least some of) the Camino to Santiago. I’m not a keen lone long distance rambler, though. Maybe I can get the missus to come along (though she’s a bike nut rather than plodder), or I’ll have to rope in a mate or 3.

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Another couple of fantastic photos, Paul. Keep 'em coming.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    Today I walked from The Minack Theatre at Porthcurno to Marazion. As I walked round to Mousehole, I saw a piece of ironwork which I believe is all that remains of the MV Union Star which was wrecked there in 1981 along with the loss of all crew, the captains wife and children and the Mousehole lifeboat crew. I walked past the old Mousehole lifeboat building and the memorial to the men who died.

    Mousehole to Marazion was a welcome bit of flat after the last few days of up and down. Here is a picture of St Michael's Mount taken from Marazion.



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  • Sits
    replied
    Ditto, from the other side of the world. Lovely photo.

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  • jdsx
    replied
    Yeah I'm very jealous Paul....

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Terrific photo, Paul.

    I must say that your stroll around the coast is a pleasant diversion for me from the collapse of civilisation that the rest of us are consumed by.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    This is Cape Cornwall which up until 200 years ago was considered to be the most westerly part of Britain. A Cape is defined as a headland where two oceans or channels meet. In this case the water going to the left goes down the English Channel whereas the water on the right goes down the Bristol Channel.

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  • Sits
    replied
    Very evocative Paul, enjoy yourself. Hope the weather is kind and the views are good.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    St Ives to Pendeen today, just 14 miles but with loads of ups and downs and it hurt. A lot. Looking out to sea I could see nothing except sea, no ships, no boats, no islands, nothing. I walked past Zennor though and as I've been to Zeal Monachorum it's another tick in the obscure places list.

    Round Cape Cornwall and Land's End tomorrow and I will have the prevailing wind on my back. Always exciting going round a Cape.

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  • Sits
    replied
    Nice one Paul. It's sounding like a better place to be by the minute.

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  • pebblethefish
    replied
    In my day they were full of teenagers getting drunk and making out.

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  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    I guess graveyards are quiet too....

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  • Paul S
    replied
    I'm taking the sleeper train down to Penzance tomorrow evening and then restarting my walk at St Ives. Genuinely concerned about this coronavirus stuff, but I figure I'll be far safer walking the Cornish coast with the air coming off the Atlantic rather than going into work in London every day. I've booked B&B's all the way, but I think some B&B's and pubs will close so my tent option will be a good one. Fortunately some years ago I invested in a really good 3/4 season sleeping bag, so I won't go cold. I've pitched my tent in public parks, on grass verges and in church graveyards before so there's always somewhere to camp. Church graveyards are the best as they normally have a water tap in them!

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  • Paul S
    replied
    I am due to restart on the SWCP at the end of next week. I've got B&B's booked for the week, but I'm seriously considering taking my tent and sleeping bag just in case of this Coronovirus that's going about. Then if a B&B gets closed because of it at least I would have somewhere to stay for the night. Or am I being a bit to over dramatic?

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    There was a lovely light on the trail first thing. And no rattlesnakes that I saw.

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Nothing as impressive as the feats on this thread, but I went on my 5 miles, 1000 foot climb up the mountain near the house today. I had a thing that I've had a few times recently - walking uphill seems to really tighten up my lower back. As soon as I hit flat or down it recovers immediately. Does anyone else get this?

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  • Sits
    replied
    Originally posted by nmrfox View Post

    Ummm, sorry if I didn't make it clear there - its the Yorkshire 3 Peaks challenge that I'm doing of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside & Ingleborough. Again, apologies for not stating the Yorkshire bit in my first post.
    I assumed you were going to be crapping all over Scafell Pike. Which could almost be a HMHB song.

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  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Originally posted by nmrfox View Post

    Ummm, sorry if I didn't make it clear there - its the Yorkshire 3 Peaks challenge that I'm doing of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside & Ingleborough. Again, apologies for not stating the Yorkshire bit in my first post.
    Ah excellent, I did it twice and it's a cracking challenge. I am very tempted to do it again around May time as a fitness check (got a 9.01 PR to beat...)

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    All rather grim and tawdry, wasn't it. And wholly unnecessary.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post
    Not to seriously derail the thread, but I presume that you've been watching Murder 24/7, Paul?
    Yes I did and I spent the entire time working out where each shot of the town was. Like every place there are roads you wouldn't want to walk down at night but none of those were the ones featured on Murder 24/7. The flats where the murder took place are built on the old South Bank at Roots Hall btw.

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Not to seriously derail the thread, but I presume that you've been watching Murder 24/7, Paul?

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  • Paul S
    replied
    Originally posted by nmrfox View Post

    Ummm, sorry if I didn't make it clear there - its the Yorkshire 3 Peaks challenge that I'm doing of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside & Ingleborough. Again, apologies for not stating the Yorkshire bit in my first post.
    Well done nmrfox, I always thought you a decent sort!

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    *Paul weeps gently to himself and goes out for a long walk*

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  • nmrfox
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul S View Post
    Nmrfox, I know that you mean well and want to raise money for charity, but honestly the three peaks challenge is causing so many problems you'd be better off finding alternatives. The walker and climber Cameron Mcneish has said that he would rather visit the three largest industrial estates in Britain than climb the three peaks in 24 hours. Yes it sounds like a great challenge, but the Lake District is being overloaded with people doing the challenge with over 80 minibuses being parked up in June and July with people attempting Scafell Pike. Then you have the lack of toilet facilities resulting in a pile of poo topped with tissue paper being found at regular intervals and you'll begin to see the problem.

    Why not choose three other summits and do those instead? Try something local, pick the tops of three local counties and try those instead? As you well know Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon are fantastic mountains each deserving a fulls days walk and that means you can use other tracks to the summit. I have a first edition of the Guinness book of Records which lists the highest points of each county of Britain if you are interested!
    Ummm, sorry if I didn't make it clear there - its the Yorkshire 3 Peaks challenge that I'm doing of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside & Ingleborough. Again, apologies for not stating the Yorkshire bit in my first post.

    Leave a comment:

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