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Backpacks and blisters - the walking thread

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  • caja-dglh
    replied
    Liberal application of glide helps as well. On occasion I have used KT tape for key spots that get problems (for me, strangely, the inside at the arch).

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    I last wore hiking boots about 10 years ago. When I last moved house I realised that they were basically unused and threw them out. I've moved to trail runners, mostly. I do have a pair of very clompy Merrells hiking shoes for snowy conditions, otherwise I'm in Saucony Peregrines at the moment and find them to be very, very good.

    What I find key for reducing blisters (other than sensible pacing and not bombing down hills) is having really good socks (and sock liners), and replacing the inserts in the shoe with something more solid and more specific to my feet.

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  • Sits
    replied
    How are Paul's feet today I wonder?

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  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Blisters...good venting, good socks, shoes that fit well prevent them for a while but ultimately, they are inevitable as UA says...

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Was going to suggest that MS is our in house expert on hiking footwear, but see he has already come through.

    In a similar vein, I have been very happy with Merrell’s Moab line, which are slightly heavier than a trail runner (while still saving pounds over my traditional boots) but provide better support for my problematic feet. They also have an ankle height version if one is prone to turning ankles.

    As to blisters, I was raised to see them as inevitable, but believe that good fitting shoes are the best tool to minimize them. If you are planning a serious walk, I would definitely recommend getting fitted by a reliable purveyor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    One of the UK most "famous" backpackers, Chris Townsend, has long given up on boots (except when up going up snowy hills/mountains) and recommends shoes/sandals. He has done some pretty big walks with sandals, that included some serious mountains as it happens.

    The accepted norms for summer wildcamping amongst those I know is to use mesh trail running trainers, like La Sportiva Raptor. I personnaly use Adidas Terrex trail running shoes. The idea is to have ample venting and it does not matter if the feet wet out as it dries quickly (unlike footwear which has a wateproof membrane in it). Those shoes are also very light.

    Mind, this summer I used a pair of Scarpa Nitro boots during my Italian hiking holiday anddespite the goretex liner they proved to be very breathable, they are super light and they handled the rough terrain of the Alps with sterling efficiency. Very happy with them, superbly confortable too.

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  • treibeis
    replied
    Don't you have to piss in your boots before you put them on for the first time? Or is that just soldiers before they go yomping?

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Thanks for everyone's comments on my piece of writing.

    I'm interested, actually, on what people use for footwear on longish walks. Obviously, if you are going up a mountain, boots are essential, but for flatter stuff I've read various accounts of folk going with sandals, trainers, flip-flops or even barefoot. Boots protect the feet but maybe don't toughen them up enough? No idea. And - as someone tentatively planning some kind of long walk in a year's time or so - what have you found the best solution to prevent/cure blisters?

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  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    My cousin runs one in the Rhetic Alps, the Bernina area of the Italian/Swiss Alps, always enjoy going to visit him

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Fantastic stuff from Sporting.

    It's not a patch on Sporting, of course, but my favourite walking trip was 5 days in the Otztal Alps, going from hut to hut. I can't recommend the Austrian and Italian Alpine huts enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • SouthdownRebel
    replied
    This belongs on here I think.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    A dreadful day today walking in pouring rain and strong winds. My ferry from Arran back to the Kintyre peninsula was delayed by the sea swell and a longer crossing. This meant I missed the last ferry to Gigha and am now camping at the ferry terminal car park where there is free CalMac WiFi. Across to Carradale tomorrow to camp again.

    Leave a comment:


  • longeared
    replied
    Completely puny compared to Sporting's walk, but did 10 miles up and down the cliffs from Sidmouth to Exmouth today. Headwind all the way, blowing in a warm breeze which at least made it more pleasant given that I was wearing shorts in the rain.

    Passing the firing range at Sandy Bay there was a sign saying "RING BELL". Given that it was MoD property it took a lot of effort on my part not to do so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    That was quite a read, certainly a backpack like no other i have read before!

    Your love for Africa, despite all its problems, shines through.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    That's a great piece of writing Sporting. Thanks so much for sharing it

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  • Sits
    replied
    Yes I was thinking along similar lines earlier. Thanks for the link Sporting. I will look forward to the opportunity to read it properly.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Sporting, it's hard for me to recall a new poster who has made such valuable contributions in his or her first weeks here.

    It's great to have you around.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    You're not an arsehole at all. Thanks!

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  • Furtho
    replied
    Sorry to be an arsehole, Sporting, but I reckon the correct link points to here.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Thanks! I don't intend to clutter up this good board with a very long and probably very tedious account of a walk I did quite some time back but for anyone who is interested I put the account all on a wordpress thingy, here:

    https://wordpress.com/post/centralaf...ordpress.com/9

    Leave a comment:


  • Furtho
    replied
    Sporting, you can’t attach a Word doc to a post here. I suggest you cut and paste from your document and create several posts here on OTF by that means.

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  • jameswba
    replied
    This is an enjoyable thread.

    The northern half of Slovakia is a brilliant region for walking. I've got two mountain ranges within less than an hour's travel, the Velka Fatra and Mala Fatra, with plenty of peaks of 1,500+ metres. Slightly further away are the two Tatra national parks, the High Tatras and Low Tatras. All are fine areas for wildlife spotting (though I've still only managed one bear sighting). All are dotted with mountain cabins/cottages for overnight stays, so probably a few more creature comforts than on Sporting's trek.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Would be delighted to read it. Ping Snake Plisken on here, he is the IT God of the board, should you need help!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul S View Post
    Sporting that sounds fantastic, please tell us more!
    With pleasure but I don't want to take up the whole thread with my experiences. I've got a word document somewhere with the whole story...not sure if it's possible to attach it to here in some way, yours truly not being the best computer bod!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S
    replied
    Sporting that sounds fantastic, please tell us more!

    Leave a comment:

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