Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Backpacks and blisters - the walking thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Paul S
    replied
    A dreadful day today walking in pouring rain and strong winds. My ferry from Arran back to the Kintyre peninsula was delayed by the sea swell and a longer crossing. This meant I missed the last ferry to Gigha and am now camping at the ferry terminal car park where there is free CalMac WiFi. Across to Carradale tomorrow to camp again.

    Leave a comment:


  • longeared
    replied
    Completely puny compared to Sporting's walk, but did 10 miles up and down the cliffs from Sidmouth to Exmouth today. Headwind all the way, blowing in a warm breeze which at least made it more pleasant given that I was wearing shorts in the rain.

    Passing the firing range at Sandy Bay there was a sign saying "RING BELL". Given that it was MoD property it took a lot of effort on my part not to do so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    That was quite a read, certainly a backpack like no other i have read before!

    Your love for Africa, despite all its problems, shines through.

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    That's a great piece of writing Sporting. Thanks so much for sharing it

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Yes I was thinking along similar lines earlier. Thanks for the link Sporting. I will look forward to the opportunity to read it properly.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Sporting, it's hard for me to recall a new poster who has made such valuable contributions in his or her first weeks here.

    It's great to have you around.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    You're not an arsehole at all. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • Furtho
    replied
    Sorry to be an arsehole, Sporting, but I reckon the correct link points to here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Thanks! I don't intend to clutter up this good board with a very long and probably very tedious account of a walk I did quite some time back but for anyone who is interested I put the account all on a wordpress thingy, here:

    https://wordpress.com/post/centralaf...ordpress.com/9

    Leave a comment:


  • Furtho
    replied
    Sporting, you can’t attach a Word doc to a post here. I suggest you cut and paste from your document and create several posts here on OTF by that means.

    Leave a comment:


  • jameswba
    replied
    This is an enjoyable thread.

    The northern half of Slovakia is a brilliant region for walking. I've got two mountain ranges within less than an hour's travel, the Velka Fatra and Mala Fatra, with plenty of peaks of 1,500+ metres. Slightly further away are the two Tatra national parks, the High Tatras and Low Tatras. All are fine areas for wildlife spotting (though I've still only managed one bear sighting). All are dotted with mountain cabins/cottages for overnight stays, so probably a few more creature comforts than on Sporting's trek.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Would be delighted to read it. Ping Snake Plisken on here, he is the IT God of the board, should you need help!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul S View Post
    Sporting that sounds fantastic, please tell us more!
    With pleasure but I don't want to take up the whole thread with my experiences. I've got a word document somewhere with the whole story...not sure if it's possible to attach it to here in some way, yours truly not being the best computer bod!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S
    replied
    Sporting that sounds fantastic, please tell us more!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by Moonlight shadow View Post
    Correct, popular paths are so because they tend to be quite good...

    How did you manage with water? Filter? Stopping at the village well?

    Most of the way, there was a river running alongside which I bathed in, washed my clothes in and the water of whcih I boiled for tea, coffee, rice etc. In each village along the way there was usually at least one food store and often a market. It wasn't the desert, let's say, but pretty green and luscious most of the way. Dead poor though. There were village wells too, and quite a bit of rain during the 16 days which was most refreshing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Correct, popular paths are so because they tend to be quite good...

    How did you manage with water? Filter? Stopping at the village well?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by Moonlight shadow View Post
    Just like that Sporting...we waffle about hikes in the UK and you turn up with the kind of trek that has 'proper adventure' written all over it...away from any tourist areas, improvised a fair bit...everythink a proper trek should be!
    Yes...it was definitely improvised, and not without its challenges (getting by in very basic French and even more basic Arabic; being warned about elephants and so on along the way; etc.) but I've certainly nowt against walking well-trodden paths...if they weren't well-trodden then probably they wouldn't be worth it

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonlight shadow
    replied
    Just like that Sporting...we waffle about hikes in the UK and you turn up with the kind of trek that has 'proper adventure' written all over it...away from any tourist areas, improvised a fair bit...everythink a proper trek should be!

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S
    replied
    The train and coach were OK and the walk was fine. However, the water is not drinkable on the Kintyre peninsula so I took the ferry to Lochranza and have booked into a campsite there.

    I also found out the Campbeltown to Ardrossan ferry is suspended until at least Friday which means a rethink. Friday is a spare day so it may be a case of bus and ferry to Lochranza then bus to Brodick and camp somewhere near there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Love walking, should do more of it. Back in the day I walked 600k from Bangassou in the Central African Republic to the Sudanese border; it took me 16 days. I did it because there was no other means of transport. I stayed at night in various places, such as empty schools, grain stores, mud huts, outside next to the dying embers of cooking fires. People were incredibly generous: I was given pineapples virtually every day, invited to eat (most of the time I cooked for myself using makeshift fires), made most welcome. Feet were well fucked by the end of the trek but it was well worth it. Good animal life too: monkeys, exotic birds, the odd snake and even a close encounter with a wild boar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bordeaux Education
    replied
    Staying with some friends who moved from London to Skipton mainly for the walking. Have just gone from the centre of town to Skipton Moor which was a 8 mile round trip up to 373 metres. Absolutely lovely walk that was reasonably strenuous and in gorgeous conditions; however the wind chilled it quite a lot on the last section. I coudl see some other walkers thinking "Daft a'p'orth walking up moor in Hawaiian shirt like it's Sunday stroll". Up the top had a 360 degree view up to 15 miles of Ilkley moor, Sharp Haw, Rough Haw, Crack Haw, Malham, Bolton Abbey, Barden Moor, Simon's Seat and Embsay Crag. Rescued a lost woman as well. I will be back. Great pubs, friendly place and a nice Parkrun which I am regretting a touch now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S
    replied
    I start the Kintyre Way tomorrow. Only the Caledonian sleeper and a coach to Tarbert stand in my way. What could possibly go wrong?

    My first camp will be a wild camp somewhere near to Loch Ciaran, or maybe the lochans just before it. I like to wild camp on my first night of a walk, it's me against Mother Nature. I've left the city behind, I have camp food, I don't take alcohol either, it's a sort of cleansing process. I just hope there's been enough rain up there and the warnings of blue-green algae in lochs are rescinded.

    Leave a comment:


  • Various Artist
    replied
    Originally posted by longeared View Post
    Was notable how much greener and verdant everything is in that part of Yorkshire though, down here all the grass everywhere is burnt yellow, much less of that in Calderdale and the surrounding parts. Passed Gorple and Widdop reservoirs and they were well down on capacity mind.
    Very tangential to the point of this thread, but reading longeared's post reminded me of some startling stuff in today's Western Mail: new pictures of the lost village of Tryweren, near Bala, drowned in 1967 by the formation of the Llyn Celyn reservoir to supply water to Liverpool. The water level is so low at the moment the ruins of the village have reappeared for the first time in decades and it's been possible to stroll along the old tarmac road etc.

    (Link is to the online version of the article at WalesOnline. Apologies for the revoltingly tabloidesque nature of the website, which unlike the print newspaper resembles the Sun and Mirror's sites ever more these days. Also, avoid the below-the-line comments, unless you actively enjoy Welsh people slinging insults about each other's perceived nationalism or lack thereof.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul S
    replied
    Originally posted by Felicity, I guess so View Post
    The Mull of Kintyre was traditionally used to determine the lewdness/graphicness of male nudity/sex scenes- if the penis protruded from the body further than the Mull of k protrudes from mainland Scotland...

    as for 'mist rolling in from the sea...'
    I read that in the Bill Parker book Map Addict. But this was for magazines only and then the internet came along and destroyed all the rules they previously had. For better or worse I suppose.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bordeaux Education
    replied
    Good timing. The girl that got me into running - mainly by me sitting next to her for too long in a pub - has got me into some walking things as well; mainly doing a sponsored walk up Snowdon. Anyway, her next venture is Everesting. Basically, it is a cyclists' thing really where you choose a hill near you and ride repeats of it in a single activity until you climb 8,848m. We are going to do it walking up the hill to Bath Race Course which is 220m which means 40 ascents in a day. The key is that you can do it as a team so one of you sets off, when you reach the top, you phone your team mate at the bottom and they set off while you descend (the descents don't count). It's ridiculous, of course, because you are doing it as a team and none of you are really doing the equivalent of climbing of Everest but, you know, it's for charidee.

    I have done loads of walking before in the Lakes, Wales, Norfolk and, you know, to the shops. I would rather walk than pretty much anything in the world outside of taking a train. We are popping up to some friends in Skipton this summer who appear to have pretty much retired early on order to just walk and drink ale in pubs on the way. When we walked previously, we used to use a book called "5 mile walks to the pub and back" or somesuch. The funny thing about this was that, after two and a half miles, we would flop into the pub and have a massive lunch with beers as we had "earned" it and we knew we had a massive two and a half miles back that we had to stock up for. Then we would get to the pub in the evening and eat loads as we has done so much exercise with out 5 mile walk in the daytime.

    Of course, when I started running, I realised that, after a while, 5 miles is nothing walking. Having done half marathons, you pass 5 mile runs after a couple of weeks. Mind you, I prefer a 5 mile walk with a pub in the middle.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X