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    I s'pose. Finding and collecting was what almost everyone did. Birds eggs, tadpoles, bush porn, all kinds of stuff. No TV back then see, so my BF and I spent most of one summer snail racing. The next we put on musical shows in his back garden and charged the little kids a halfpenny each to watch. Summer lasted forever back then.

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      Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post

      I can probably help you out with the cigarette cards ó I've catalogues etc. Believe it or not when I was a kid matchbox labels were the second most popular kids collectible, after stamps.
      I'm at work currently, but if I remember correctly his three albums are:

      1. Airlines of the World (Player's Please) - this is pre-WW2 as it has a Lufthansa JU-52 in Nazi livery
      2. Uniforms of the British Empire (Player's Please) - lots of splendid looking Indian soldiers
      3. Air Raid Precautions in association with the ARP (Will's)

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        Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
        I s'pose. Finding and collecting was what almost everyone did. Birds eggs, tadpoles, bush porn, all kinds of stuff. No TV back then see, so my BF and I spent most of one summer snail racing. The next we put on musical shows in his back garden and charged the little kids a halfpenny each to watch. Summer lasted forever back then.
        Whilst I'm a tad younger than you Amor, it wasn't so different in the early 70s. Stamps, coins, the usual. But in our school there was also a big bottletop collecting craze with swaps for rarities etc. plus games we played with them.

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          Originally posted by Sits View Post

          I'm at work currently, but if I remember correctly his three albums are:

          1. Airlines of the World (Player's Please) - this is pre-WW2 as it has a Lufthansa JU-52 in Nazi livery
          2. Uniforms of the British Empire (Player's Please) - lots of splendid looking Indian soldiers
          3. Air Raid Precautions in association with the ARP (Will's)
          OK the catalogs are in the loft. I'll get up there in the next couple of days and see what I can find.

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            Don't put yourself out, I wouldn't sell them anyway. As they say on Antiques Roadshow.

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              The New York Public Library has a huge collection of digitised cigarette cards

              Player's International Air Liners

              Wills's Air Raid Precautions (one of multiple sets)

              Last edited by ursus arctos; 15-08-2019, 11:20.

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                  Theyíre the ones.

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                    Originally posted by Sits View Post
                    Don't put yourself out, I wouldn't sell them anyway. As they say on Antiques Roadshow.
                    It's OK, there a couple of other things I want from up there anyway.

                    Like comic books, cigarette cards tend to fall into different eras. Late nineteenth century to just post WW1("Golden"), between the wars ("Silver.") Post WW2, ciggie cards were replaced by tea cards etc. and the monetary values are generally negligible. Subject is also a factor. Sports cards, especially football, are always massively collectible. As are particularly era-specific sets, such as the air raid precautions one you mention.

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                        Some more ďmarine layerĒ for you today. This is taken on the road between Del Mar and Solana Beach. Unlike the pics from earlier in the week, by 10:30 today the cloudy fog had been in retreat for a while and the bank was out in the ocean.

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                          Thatís lovely SB. Interesting that UA said this was a Pacific-specific phenomenon (well not definitively); Iíve seen it many times at Port Douglas in the Queensland tropics. Same ocean, however far away. Iíll have a dig around for pics.

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                            To be a bit clearer, not unknown on the Atlantic Coast, but much less common in my experience.

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                              Yes I realised you didnít state it as categorical fact, hence my parentheses. (Which I added on edit).

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                                I've been thinking about why this is the case and the first thing that comes to mind are that coastal mountain ranges are significantly closer to the ocean on the west coast of the US.

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                                  A final piece in my Coastal Fog photos. Today it was all the way inland. The walk was positively damp for the first few miles, with the sun only coming out as I got back to the front door. This is the view of the Mission Trails hills from the Big Rock Trail.

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                                    Maybe not the most scenic place to place that hashtag...

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                                      One for Amor

                                      Granville Street, 1965

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                                        Is that a Fred Herzog pic? Most photos of Vancouver from that period are his. As a European immigrant he was a relentless documentarian of his new home.


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                                          It wasn't credited, but certainly could be.

                                          The "White Lunch Cafeteria" caught my eye given your recent post.

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                                            They were a local chain of diners. Still around when I first arrived. Disappeared a few years later, as many did with the advent of fast food.

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                                              Were they diners or cafeterias?

                                              We had both, but only the former survived. The primary difference was that diners had table service and. Poked food to order. The advent of frozen food was also said to have hurt the cafeterias, as single people and couples with Pullman Kitchens often ate dinner there.

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                                                Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                                                Were they diners or cafeterias?

                                                We had both, but only the former survived. The primary difference was that diners had table service and. Poked food to order. The advent of frozen food was also said to have hurt the cafeterias, as single people and couples with Pullman Kitchens often ate dinner there.
                                                I never went in one, so I can't say for sure. It says cafeteria on the sign, so probably that's what it was. There were both, but diners were more common.

                                                [Edit]

                                                Found this brief history on-line:

                                                White Lunch Cafeteria. There were several locations around town, including 124 West Hastings, Granville Street,(inn the photo) Pender, beside the Lux Theatre (57 E Hastings) and at 130 E Hastings before it became the Blue Eagle in the mid-1940s. The name referred to the race of the staff and clientele. Staff at all locations staged a 6-month long strike in 1937 and won improved working conditions and wages. White Lunch shut down in the 1970s.

                                                Were White Castle restaurants in the US a similar type of code? Several department stores here also had "White Sales" once or twice a year. I've often wondered if they were a similar type of indexical sign.
                                                Last edited by Amor de Cosmos; 25-08-2019, 19:41.

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                                                  Originally posted by Sits View Post
                                                  Thatís lovely SB. Interesting that UA said this was a Pacific-specific phenomenon (well not definitively); Iíve seen it many times at Port Douglas in the Queensland tropics. Same ocean, however far away. Iíll have a dig around for pics.

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                                                    Gorgeous, Sits.

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