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Scientific Thinking Across the Centuries and the Foundations of Physics

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    Scientific Thinking Across the Centuries and the Foundations of Physics

    https://www.oxforduniversitystores.c...ons-of-physics

    Fyi - free lecture by Carlo Rovelli. This is the link to register for it.

    #2
    Pictures of Europeans and no picture of Imhotep, can't be much kop as the Greeks and the likes of Newton didn't invent anything that wasn't known 5000 odd years ago.

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      #3
      Originally posted by Tactical Genius View Post
      Pictures of Europeans and no picture of Imhotep, can't be much kop as the Greeks and the likes of Newton didn't invent anything that wasn't known 5000 odd years ago.
      A cursory look at the history of pyramid building would show that the ancient Egyptians would have benefited from Newton's laws, as many early attempts collapsed.

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        #4
        Thanks gt3. If my high level SAT question is correct, I'll be teaching during that time. But hey, a free or pay-what-you-want science talk thread would be good.

        https://pioneerworks.org/programs/bl...f-all-we-know/

        Janna Levin is presenting "Black Holes: The Edge of All We Know," with a screening of the documentary and a Q&A. It will air for 24 hours (meaning I think the Q&A won't exactly be a Senate filibuster marathon,) and it's pay what you want even if it's $0.00.

        The documentary is uneven, and the title is a bit naff as it should be "The Edge of All We Knew in 2017" as every month is bringing a new insight since then, but it's well worth watching as it has the last few months of Steven Hawking's life working on this paper - https://arxiv.org/pdf/1810.01847.pdf

        Half of it deals with Steven Hawking's group, and half deals with the people working with the Event Horizon Telescope. It offers an invaluable look into how they worked together across 6 or 7 continents to come up with the picture of M-87.

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          #5
          Thanks for posting. It’s above my level but I did read a bit about Rovelli’s theories. There are some other events on there that also look interesting.

          edit: just looked at jv’s suggestions and they sound more accessible. Thanks again.

          I used to go to Gresham College’s free lectures pre-Covid; lots of maths. I shall check out their website.
          Last edited by MsD; 07-04-2021, 11:09.

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            #6
            This seems the appropriate thread for this - muons are wobbling when subjected to magnetic fields due to influences as yet unexplained, but presumably forms of dark matter and dark energy:

            https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1379813228214169602

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              #7
              Cheers all, the thread was just meant to be a well, look here's a free thing about Quantum Physics by one of the leading lights de jour. It was never an endorsement of any perceived cultural appropriation...

              Anyway, most of the stuff I read about QP is way beyond me - but I'm curious and much of it reads like poetry to be honest. And it's CARLO ROVELLI FOR FREE....


              JV - thanks for the link, I'll be sure to check it out.

              DR - There is also a thing about The God Equation which is coming close to Einstein's Theory of Everything. I heard something about it on the radio this morning...

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                #8
                Mostly not science, but free and worthwhile - I checked out the Gresham College site and they do have free lectures, live and recorded.

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                  #9
                  Thank you gt3, as I realized with the time change it will be during my 2-hour lunchtime. Thus, I signed up.

                  One of my 4th grade students had a great question today. If you keep breaking a magnet into pieces until they are infinitesimally small, will they still have a north and south pole.

                  Apparently quantum magnetics is a major thing happening right now: https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc...cntn_id=300959

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                    #10
                    jason voorhees what's the answer about the infinitesimally small magnets? And what the hell is "..a quantized topological phase in a pristine magnet"????????!!!!!!

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by jason voorhees View Post
                      Thank you gt3, as I realized with the time change it will be during my 2-hour lunchtime. Thus, I signed up.

                      One of my 4th grade students had a great question today. If you keep breaking a magnet into pieces until they are infinitesimally small, will they still have a north and south pole.

                      Apparently quantum magnetics is a major thing happening right now: https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc...cntn_id=300959
                      You'd have to define 'magnet' and 'infinitessimally small". Presumably the magnet is ferromagnetic? And do you mean by "infinitessimaly small", one atom of iron? Or do you mean subatomic?

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                        #12
                        subatomic.

                        Basically, is there a point when the north is not attracted to the south because it is too thin.

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