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The "best" dishes of each country

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    #76
    Originally posted by Sporting View Post
    Bara brith would be a reasonable choice for Wales.
    Yes, well, there's that and Welsh cakes which I think are more widespread nowadays. Laverbread is probably the oldest extant Welsh food but, again, not widely eaten nowadays.
    Last edited by Bordeaux Education; Yesterday, 14:27.

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      #77
      Originally posted by Gangster Octopus View Post
      Are you single?
      Has your society lost the technology of toothpaste?

      Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
      Ha. (Volume of food notwithstanding, I can't decide whether that meal looks post-apocalypse or just post-Brexit...)
      I wouldn't mock it. Bacon, turnips, potatoes and butter. Four things that were rationed in England, but not in Ireland.

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        #78
        Bored, tagliatelle bolognese certainly does "exist" (unless you mean them anglicising the name). Indeed it's the only way you'll get pasta al ragu in Bologna (NEVER on spaghetti). Agreed it's a dumb choice as a "national" dish as opposed to a regional one at best, as yes, Italy probably has as much a diverse regional culinary tradition as China, India or Germany.
        Last edited by Rogin the Armchair fan; 13-02-2020, 08:42.

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          #79
          Originally posted by Bordeaux Education View Post

          Yes, well, there's that and Welsh cakes which I think are more widespread nowadays. Laverbread is probably the oldest Welsh food but, again, not widely eaten nowadays.
          This is all true. However none of them, nor bara brith, are really "dishes" – any more than Turkish Delight is. Mind, I'd really struggle to nominate a national Welsh dish and I've been here since I was 7. Something involving lamb, perhaps?

          That list is admittedly all over the place on what it considers a dish, of course. The New Zealand one puzzles me: a hangi isn't a dish, it's just a way of cooking. It's like if someone suggested the national dish of Australia was 'barbecue', or the national dish of Scotland was 'deep frying'.

          Having a hangi at Rotorua did introduce me to the delights of kumara (local sweet potato) and also of eating pumpkin, which I wouldn't have touched with a bargepole previously but which I discovered tasted amazing when cooked on hot stones in a covered pit, coming out all deliciously smoky and earthy-sweet. Subsequently I found they tasted good when cooked 'conventionally' too, but I wouldn't have dipped my toe in those waters otherwise.

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            #80
            Originally posted by Rogin the Armchair fan View Post
            Bored, tagliatelle bolognese certainly does "exist" (unless you mean them anglicising the name). Indeed it's the only way you'll get pasta al ragu in Bologna (NEVER on spaghetti). Agreed it's a dumb choice as a "national" dish as opposed to a regional one at best, as yes, Italy probably has as much a diverse regional culinary tradition as China, India or Germany.
            Good point. I expect the ragu in Bologna is called Bolognese but I doubt very much it is the Bolognese that they are referring to.

            Originally posted by Various Artist View Post
            This is all true. However none of them, nor bara brith, are really "dishes" – any more than Turkish Delight is. Mind, I'd really struggle to nominate a national Welsh dish and I've been here since I was 7. Something involving lamb, perhaps?.
            That's why I think it may be cawl although you can use ham or, I think, beef.
            Last edited by Bordeaux Education; 14-02-2020, 20:06.

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              #81
              Ragu Bolognese is called Ragu in Bologna, no qualifier.
              Last edited by Lang Spoon; 14-02-2020, 23:18.

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                #82
                And most manifestly does not include any tomato

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                  #83
                  I don't expect this to make any shortlist:

                  https://twitter.com/BibiBaskin/status/1230178257494007810

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                    #84
                    Working from home the morra, so going to try the new pizza joint that opened in hipsterville down the road as my early dinner. Apparently it's "Puglian Pizza" rather than Neapolitan that they sell, just to be fucking different I suppose. Can't detect any difference from the pictures on their Facebook page.

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                      #85
                      Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                      And most manifestly does not include any tomato
                      Nor red wine.

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                        #86
                        What's left, then? Mince and onions?

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                          #87
                          Soffrito, white wine, rabbit meat and liver, stock. In its most basic (and really, really tasty) form.

                          Pretty straightforward really.

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                            #88
                            Originally posted by Bordeaux Education View Post
                            That's why I think it may be cawl although you can use ham or, I think, beef.
                            I've only come across cawl with lamb but it does appear more frequently on menus in as an emblematic Welsh dish than it used to. I had it as a starter at the Jolly Sailor pub overlooking the Cleddau bridge recently and the portion was absurdly large. There must have been half a pound of cheese with the bread on the side.

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                              #89
                              I believe a teaspoon or two of tomato paste may be tolerated as well by the Academy. Never a whole tin of plummers but. Plus a little milk for the last 45 minutes of simmer. I like tomatoes and basil and garlic brashness but, so my heart lies with Neapolitan ragu.
                              Last edited by Lang Spoon; 19-02-2020, 23:46.

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                                #90
                                The rabbit meat in lieu of a veal and pork mix (and mibees chicken livers) is a new one on me, Tobes.

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                                  #91
                                  Spoken like a man who has never been to Bologna. Specifically Ristorante da Nello al Montegrappa which is, most likely, my favourite restaurant in the world.

                                  Tell them I sent you.

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                                    #92
                                    Originally posted by Lang Spoon View Post
                                    The rabbit meat in lieu of a veal and pork mix (and mibees chicken livers) is a new one on me, Tobes.
                                    You want peasant food, you got it.

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                                      #93
                                      Rabbit is a riduculously under-utilised meat, given that rabbits breed like... er...

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                                        #94
                                        Myself and Herself really have to take a food and architecture (to make it respectable and seemly, likes) grand tour of Italy sharpish. We may need special sets on the return flight.

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                                          #95
                                          Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
                                          Rabbit is a riduculously under-utilised meat, given that rabbits breed like... er...
                                          You should go to (the less touristy parts of) Ibiza if you want rabbit. They know what they're doing.
                                          Last edited by Toby Gymshorts; 19-02-2020, 23:59.

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                                            #96
                                            Originally posted by Lang Spoon View Post
                                            Myself and Herself really have to take a food and architecture (to make it respectable and seemly, likes) grand tour of Italy sharpish. We may need special sets on the return flight.
                                            There's a reason they call Bologna "La Grassa", you know.

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                                              #97
                                              Had a very nice rabbit and snail stew more than once in a Barcelona menu del dia spit and sawdust place in the old Jewish quarter back in the day. They also did a reliably hearty lentil and beef estofado and sopa de caldo in the winter months. Prob a kale and juice place now but.
                                              Last edited by Lang Spoon; Yesterday, 00:02.

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                                                #98
                                                New Zealand's national dish is everything. My Kiwi mate raved and raved and raved about how good the food was in NZ - to the point where we wrre expecting it to be a huge let down. It wasn't. Every meal from eggs to oysters was astoundingly good, everywhere.

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                                                  #99
                                                  This programme (https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002rk8) was good on the difference between Spag bol and ragu. I tried the ragu recipe and, while nice and the addition of milk was interesting, I prefer spag bol. Having said that, like pretty much everyone's Bolognese (and ragu probably), mine has evolved over decades to my personal taste and availability of ingredients. Mine has actually evolved a lot from my Mum's which I grew up with (and she learnt to cook in Turin so her's may have been relatively authentic . Hers had more of a soffrito to start with diced carrots (but no celery) while I mine has grated carrots added later. We also used to add not only the already grated sawdust-esque parmesan of the time but a huge knob of butter on top. I know that my addition of mushrooms and the reasonably ubiquitous (nowadays) Worcestershire sauce is inauthentic as is mustard. My Mum's was also the basis for curry (with Italian mixed herbs taken out and curry powder added) and chilli con carne (with herbs replaced by chilli powder and, of course, kidney beans). It was also the basis of her lasagne which, I am sure I have mentioned before perhaps on this thread, was so exotic for Porthcawl in the 70s that someone asked, "What's this? Baked conveyor belt?". In saying that, that may have been a comment on her cooking. I also remember being incredulous at being served the hitherto undiscovered pizza - which had to be topped with Danish salami as there was no such thing as Italian at that time. Anyway, my idea of luxury is to slowly produce the aforementioned Spag Bol and then, the next day, using the nicely ripened sauce for my own lasagne. In fact, I heard recently, that there is scientific evidence for Bolognese sauce getting better as it matures but none of us needed science to tell us that. Science doesn't tell us that Bolognese sauce is even better in Lasagne but it is. Again, another story I may have imparted before is that I once visited Sicily and the lady we were staying with offered a lasagne which I was unbelievably looking forward to, feeling it would be an authentic version. I was shocked to discover a layer with ham and eggs in and assumed I had happened upon the only Italian lady who couldn't make cook. It was only years later that a mate of Southern Italian extraction confirmed that there was a Southern peasant version that did, indeed, include eggs and ham and made it for me. Prepared for such ingredients, I really enjoyed it this time around. Anyway, this all shows that the authentic provenance of dishes are often hit and miss.

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                                                    I never got as far down as Malta on the original list but I bet that was rabbit. The whole island is awoken each day to a dawn chorus of hunters shooting the buggers (and pigeons).

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