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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    I've had a look myself and they're basically two sides of a river, so it's the same place really. So it's possibly reasonable to assume they attended the same synagogue at times, or a junior school or celebration of some kind. Not that it really matters or has any relation to the topic at hand.

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    How close are the two places, ad hoc? Do we assume that their paths likely crossed?

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    It's all a bit easier now. Romania isn't in Schengen so it;s not quite a breeze, but it;s pretty simple (though the train still stops for an hour while guards from both countries come round and check)

    The Maxwell/Wiesel border in question is of course Romania/Ukraine

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    My crossing of the Hungarian-Romanian border in 1984 featured about a dozen people being marched off the train at gunpoint, including the African "businessman" who had been trying to interest the occupants of our carriage in the Austrian-sourced contraband in his duffel bag (Meinl coffee featured prominently).

    The guard also extorted me for the visa, and gave me "change" in Lei notes that looked to have been laundered (literally) dozens of times. One could barely make out the denominations.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Sighetu Marmației, the town on the Romanian side of that border crossing is where Elie Wiesel was born.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fussbudget
    replied
    Originally posted by sw2borshch View Post
    Couldn't resist the tap-in...
    Hey, not everyone on this board can be called Chris.

    Originally posted by Evariste Euler Gauss View Post
    The fact that he chose "Maxwell" as his new, English, surname reminds me of Maxwell House coffee (which apparently is still going, though I never see it these days)
    It makes think of Maxell C90 tapes because I keep forgetting about the missing W. Just looked up the origins of that name, which appear to be glorious nonsense ('the company's name is a contraction of "maximum capacity dry cell"', as any fule kno)

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  • elguapo4
    replied
    My only journey over the Hungarian / Romanian border was by train in 1992. On the way into Romania, we were woken up at 2 am by a large female border guard, who sat on the edge of our bunk demanding 10 dollars each for an entry Visa ( we later found out it was only 2 dollars at the airport). On the way back into Hungary, the border guards barely glanced at our passports but gave the Romanian man sharing the carriage with us a right hard time for about 10 minutes.

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    https://open.spotify.com/episode/7n0...SbCtDAVVDjR1xw

    The Behind the Bastards podcast is interesting on Epstein, as it is on everything.

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  • Incandenza
    replied
    Originally posted by WOM View Post
    I watched the doc and I heard everyone saying Ghee-len'. I was also pronouncing it the French way all these years.
    I was thinking it was "Jizz-lane" until I heard someone say it.

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  • hobbes
    replied
    Originally posted by Bruno View Post
    There's the Germanic name Gisela (hard g),
    My Mum had a friend called that. Everyone pronounced it like a cockney greeting a scouser.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    Salt mines are rather different from coal mines (at least in my experience)

    ad hoc, did the guards "accept" Romanian currency? Back in the day it would have been Deutsche Marks, Dollars or Kent cigarettes.
    Oh yes, that was the expectation. It was cheap, but with the flow of cars across all day they will have made a sizeable supplement to their income

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    Salt mines are rather different from coal mines (at least in my experience)
    I've never worked in either, nor any underground sugar caves, but I mean for that air of small town desolation.

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    He was kind of a big figure in my life as a child, the Daily Mirror was the main paper we took if we got a national (our dad dallied with Today for a while too, always keen on an iffy proprietor...) and it was the national paper of choice round our Gran's where I spent a lot of time, but that house also contained my uncle's piles of Private Eyes which I also read from a pretty early age, what with all the cartoons to draw me in.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Salt mines are rather different from coal mines (at least in my experience)

    ad hoc, did the guards "accept" Romanian currency? Back in the day it would have been Deutsche Marks, Dollars or Kent cigarettes.

    And how did you get the diacritical? It doesn't want to copy for me.
    Last edited by ursus arctos; 09-07-2020, 13:52.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Fittingly it's one of the most corrupt border crossings I've ever been through. Ukrainian side especially, with the guy taking the passports not letting you through until you slip a note in them. "Tradiție" he said (Romanian word for tradition, like it's traditional to pay to get through the border)

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Maxwell

    I imagine it to be a bit like a County Durham ex-mining place. You should see if there is any memorial to him next time you pass through, ad hoc.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Did Maxwell consider himself a Czechoslovak or primarily Jewish or Ruthenian/Rusyn or something else or just not really ever give it any thought or any kind of hoot whatsoever or just have a vague 'national' identity centred around his family and friends and the place he grew up?
    The majority of the adolescents and young adults my mother worked with in the Displaced Persons camp after the war had similarly complicated ethnic and national histories, and I married into a family where they are also common (though grounded in the former Yugoslavia, rather than Central Europe).

    My guess is that he didn't care about nationality, other than as a way to advance his personal interests. Joining the Czechoslovak Army in Exile seems primarily to have been an opportunistic choice given limited options, and one he shed as soon as something better became available. The Mossad links have always struck me as being grounded in a need for cover and a penchant for intrigue, rather than any strong devotion to the Israeli state. As you note, he almost certainly grew up with multiple languages; it was hard to function without that facility given all of the turmoil.

    His original pseudonym was Du Maurier, which he took from a brand of cigarettes. There is at least a chance that he took Maxwell from the coffee.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Blimey I've crossed the border there. Had no idea it was his birthplace

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    I would deserve anything I might get

    Just been reading Cap'n Bob's wiki page and it's got me thinking about identity, in the ethnic sense. For all he was the 'Bouncing Czech' in that lazy old way of thinking, he wasn't ethnically Czech or Slovak but grew up in a place that was in the Ruthenian bit of the first Czechoslovakia, but in a Yiddish speaking family. The village/town became part of Hungary, is now in Ukraine and is just a hop, skip and a fall off a yacht from Romania.

    Did Maxwell consider himself a Czechoslovak or primarily Jewish or Ruthenian/Rusyn or something else or just not really ever give it any thought or any kind of hoot whatsoever or just have a vague 'national' identity centred around his family and friends and the place he grew up? Did any of this make it easier for him to reinvent himself in the fog of war, as plenty did? Did he speak a few languages as a child which I understand was pretty normal for people in that milieu of the backwoodsy parts of central/eastern Europe? When borders are fluid and the authority of the centre is just an occasional pain the jacksie, it seems so alien to the likes of me, but also fascinating.

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  • WOM
    replied
    Originally posted by Evariste Euler Gauss View Post
    The fact that he chose "Maxwell" as his new, English, surname reminds me of Maxwell House coffee (which apparently is still going...
    I'd hazard that it's the #1 instant coffee brand over here. When it's on sale, the skids are piled 10-high and the old people buy their limit of jars. My mother did the same for years.

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by sw2borshch View Post
    Couldn't resist the tap-in...

    #prayforsw2borshch

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  • Evariste Euler Gauss
    replied
    The fact that he chose "Maxwell" as his new, English, surname reminds me of Maxwell House coffee (which apparently is still going, though I never see it these days) and specifically this, from the late 1970s:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?edufil...&v=S3N15IYgbDs

    Leave a comment:


  • G-Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Fussbudget View Post
    It's a minging name in any language. Not sure why you'd saddle a child with a complicated poncey French name that she'll have to spend her life spelling out for people, but decide to pronounce it in an entirely different way anyway.
    Yes, especially since her father changed his foreign name, Jan Hoch, to an English one, Robert Maxwell. Having said that, I believe Ghislaine's mother was French, and Ghislaine was born in France. So there's at least something in her putrid life that she can justify.

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  • sw2borshch
    replied
    Couldn't resist the tap-in...

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by sw2borshch View Post

    I know some people we could ask?

    Ouch!

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