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    #26
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    I've always wondered if orchestras provide new members with some kind of discount on the required uniform.
    Not back in the day, it was just expected that you had evening tails, a DJ (i.e. black dinner jacket with black bow tie),and (for summer concerts) a white DJ! Many orchestras have negotiated some sort of allowance with HMRC in lieu of a 'uniform allowance', but the rules are complicated, depending on whether you are schedule E (PAYE) or schedule D (freelance)....
    Nowadays, the orchestra I work for is usually just 'all black', meaning black suit, black shirt and dark tie....

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      #27
      Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post



      Ha! I do get feedback. Often on student evals, "Nice shoes!" type of thing. Also corridor comments from other students like "Whoa... cool vest dude!"
      Yes, and I get "Good hair, brother" from Turks here. I know what they mean, they know what they mean, both parties know what the respective other means.

      And we co-exist quite happily.

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        #28
        Originally posted by Tactical Genius View Post
        ADC rocking the Khalid Muhammed look.
        Very 1980's Public Enemy night of the living baseheads.
        I have always like the cut of your jib man.



        What's that on his head? Sweat?

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          #29
          I work in the software industry, so I see things like this unfortunately.

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            #30
            My understanding is that US orchestras were much the same, which was a reflection of the social backgrounds of administrators and one of the many reasons why their ensembles tended to come from similar backgrounds.

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              #31
              Dress down Friday has done more harm to British industry than any scenario of Brexit will ever do.

              Effectively a four day werk because everyone thinks just because they are dressed like they've turned up to tarmac the roof, that they can look at kitten videos on you tube all day. Fuck off and work in a call centre.

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                #32
                I didnít know there was a dress code for PhD defenses. I donít think thatís true here, but Iíve never been to one. Of course, we do have cap and gown for degree ceremonies, including high school. And theyíve become fancier over the years.

                I work from home, but I do take a shower an put on presentable clothes. Today itís jeans and a t-shirt. Iíve already changed the shirt once because Tonka and I went for a walk before work and itís so humid out that it was damp after just a half-hour walk. Thatís pretty typical.

                Most of my clothes are too big for me now. Thatís fine with t-shirts, flannel shirts, jumpers, and even casual shirts with a collar. People just think Iím stuck in 1992. But with proper clothes, they need to fit a bit better.

                I gave away my only suit a while ago. I only ever have to look vaguely dressed up at conferences and I barely go to any of those now. I have a few blazers/sportcoats that are too big for me now, as are all my dress shirts. Iíll have to get some new ones, I guess but Iím going to wait as long as I can because I hope to lose even more weight.

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                  #33
                  Jacket and tie (but not a suit) was the strong expectation (though perhaps not a formal rule) for men back on my day. I even wore that for my honours oral exam.

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                    #34
                    Originally posted by Tactical Genius View Post
                    ADC rocking the Khalid Muhammed look.
                    Very 1980's Public Enemy night of the living baseheads.
                    I have always like the cut of your jib man.


                    Cheers TG.

                    BTW for anyone who's interested here's a link to The African Waistcoat Company. Can't recommend him enough, huge selection of fabrics (I think he makes a buying trip to Nigeria every year.) And, as you'd expect, first class craftmanship.


                    http://www.africanwaistcoatcompany.com/

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                      #35
                      With me doing voluntary work, it's quite relaxed. There are fleeces and polo shirts with embroidered logos for paid staff and long term volunteers but you're not forced to wear them (I do wear mine though because first impressions are important). You do have to wear a lanyard with a nametag though so that customers know who to approach.

                      Other than that, as long as you're vaguely presentable (i.e. clean and not showing too much skin) you're OK.

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                        #36
                        Originally posted by Big Boobs and FIRE! View Post
                        Effectively a four day werk
                        Said in your best Teesside/Hull accent. Presumably wearing a perple shert as well.

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                          #37
                          Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post

                          A surfing term that will be recognised in other places where surfing is popular, but has become ubiquitous here
                          Boardies, bra

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                            #38
                            Originally posted by Big Boobs and FIRE! View Post
                            Dress down Friday has done more harm to British industry than any scenario of Brexit will ever do.

                            Effectively a four day werk because everyone thinks just because they are dressed like they've turned up to tarmac the roof, that they can look at kitten videos on you tube all day. Fuck off and work in a call centre.
                            Beautifully written utter bollocks.

                            I'll have you know that my work ethic is impeccable (and the fact I fuck off to the pub Friday lunchtime is neither here nor there).

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                              #39
                              Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
                              Early in the semester one of a series of waistcoats made of Nigerian/Ghanaian textiles (bought from an eccentric ex-savile row tailor in Camden Passage.) Shirts are a solid colour, green, orange, red, cream and so on depending on the colour of the waistcoat. Slacks with coloured braces (suspenders) and suede shoes, either red, dark green or orange and khaki. As we move through the classes clothing gets more informal. Jeans, leather jacket, etc. This isn't a code, it's my choice. I teach visual communication so clothing is relevant. Beginning with a traditional (albeit colourful) wardrobe indicates a separation from the students ie: I'm not their friend, but what we'll learn isn't going to be boring. Or that's my thinking.
                              Love it

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                                #40
                                Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                                Jacket and tie (but not a suit) was the strong expectation (though perhaps not a formal rule) for men back on my day. I even wore that for my honours oral exam.
                                At many places, students dressed up for every class well into the 60s, at least.

                                I donít think I had a jacket or tie when I did my masters exam. Button down shirt, proper trousers, etc. That was 1997. But it wasnít so much that it was expected for the occasion so much that it was one of those moments in life when I was hoping to impress somebody or at least wanted them to see me as a fully functioning adult.

                                Somebody once told me ďalways dress up a bit if youíre going to the airport or a hospital,Ē because at either place, you may have to negotiate with somebody accustomed to being yelled at. You donít want to pull a ďdo you know who I am?Ē But they might treat you with more respect than the people who roll-up in sweatpants.

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                                  #41
                                  Originally posted by Fussbudget View Post

                                  I beg to differ.


                                  And with this also. Isn't it great that we all have different tastes though.
                                  Ok, I'm genuinely interested here. What women's shoes are smart, elegant, can be worn in a corporate environment, and are genuinely comfortable? I have never found any.

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                                    #42
                                    I had to do a viva for a professional qualification in the 1990s and suits and ties were compulsory for men, and suits for women. Viva day was early November and we were told very clearly by our lecturers to wear a poppy, as the senior examiner sat in on random ones and frowned upon anyone not wearing one - apocryphally one year he failed someone for not wearing one. A few years later I went back to sit on the other side of the table as an examiner and by then he'd been replaced but poppies were still ubiquitous.

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                                      #43
                                      Originally posted by Balderdasha View Post

                                      Ok, I'm genuinely interested here. What women's shoes are smart, elegant, can be worn in a corporate environment, and are genuinely comfortable? I have never found any.

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                                        #44
                                        The consensus in the US appears to be Tory Burch ballet flats. Ubiquitous things on the opposite end of the scale (absolutely no support so hammer your feet differently)

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                                          #45
                                          Or Ferragamo tuxedo pumps, depending on one's vintage.

                                          ms. ursus had at least half a dozen pair back when she was practicing law.

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                                            #46
                                            Originally posted by Balderdasha View Post
                                            Ok, I'm genuinely interested here. What women's shoes are smart, elegant, can be worn in a corporate environment, and are genuinely comfortable? I have never found any.
                                            When we used to have a dress code I mostly wore brogues, loafers and monk strap shoes. Pretty much any smart men's style is easily available for women as well these days.

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                                              #47
                                              Just looked up Tory Burch ballet flats and Ferragamo tuxedo pumps. Those are exactly the type of things that I was talking about that are impossible to walk in. Unbelievably uncomfortable. I'd take heels over them any day.

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                                                #48
                                                Women's feet and styles of walking differ.

                                                Film at 11.

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                                                  #49
                                                  Originally posted by Fussbudget View Post
                                                  When we used to have a dress code I mostly wore brogues, loafers and monk strap shoes. Pretty much any smart men's style is easily available for women as well these days.
                                                  These, I will concede, look wonderful on some women, but not on me. I am tiny (in almost every way, short, usually slim, very small bone structure, quite delicate features). If I wear something like that I look like I accidentally put on my dad's shoes while getting dressed in the dark. Also, according to my husband, the men's versions of these are still uncomfortable.

                                                  Heels give me slightly more height (I don't wear high ones), and for want of a better word, they go better with my slightly more 'feminine' style.

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                                                    #50
                                                    Ballet flats are definitely awful to walk in for more than 10 minutes, they have absolutely no support. They also tend to look scruffy really quickly.

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