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What's your work dress code?

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    What's your work dress code?

    In the latter years of being a teacher, I have been forced into the dreaded 'smart-casual' clothes. I had previously liked smart or casual but didn't really like the sort of clumsy chimera between the two. When I started, I regularly wore - and was well known for wearing - a suit but it soon became obvious it was impractical especially as when I was in the early years classes and regularly sat on play-doh, got painted on or got grabbed by sticky dirty hands. I migrated to the smart-casual shirts and jumpers that my mother and mother-in-law bought be as present from Marks and Spencer's which I previously couldn't work out an occasion for. I even was able to wear the items that were odd mixes between cardigans and hoodies that I mentally attached to lone weekday afternoon pub drinkers. I now appear to be completely consumed in autumnal colours all year around as I can get away with hardwearing easy-to-wash jeans in those colours and I have ended up with desert boots being the best footwear.

    Anyway, what does everyone wear nowadays? Anyone still have to wear suits and ties? Bowler hats? Anyone wear specific unique clothing for their job?

    #2
    Board shorts and a t-shirt for most days in my home office. I sometimes dress up by wearing jeans when it's cold. On very special occasions, like video conferences, I might wear a polo.

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      #3
      Suit and tie for me, as insurance is a very "traditional"* business.

      Dress down on Fridays, but there are some rules. Rules which I take great delight in breaking.

      *some might say archaic, but not me. No siree Bob.

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        #4
        Well, I had to google board shorts. Is that an Americanism?

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          #5
          Originally posted by Toby Gymshorts View Post
          Suit and tie for me, as insurance is a very "traditional"* business.

          Dress down on Fridays, but there are some rules. Rules which I take great delight in breaking.
          You mean you dress up rather than down?

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            #6
            Yep, mostly I go full cosplay.

            As in, I wear T-shirt, jeans and *gasp* trainers. Men are supposed to wear a shirt with a collar (so a polo shirt, which I sometimes wear), ripped jeans are a no-no (fine by me) and shoes (which I will sometimes wear if I feel like wearing a casual shirt as opposed to a T).

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              #7
              Originally posted by Sporting View Post
              Well, I had to google board shorts. Is that an Americanism?
              A surfing term that will be recognised in other places where surfing is popular, but has become ubiquitous here

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                #8
                Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post

                A surfing term that will be recognised in other places where surfing is popular, but has become ubiquitous here
                Sporting doesn't recognize them and just defaults to the European norm of "Speedo's"

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                  #9
                  Work uniforms I have worn:

                  A full uniform when I was a bank cashier. Had the advantage of not having to think what I was going to wear each morning. Made of horrible fabric that got too hot in the summer.

                  TEFL teaching in China. Could wear whatever I wanted within the weird Chinese rules about what's considered decent. So no strappy tops (bra straps must never be visible), no crop tops (can't expose your stomach), but hot pants and bondage-inspired trousers with loads of zips and chains were fine (I didn't wear these, my fellow colleagues often did). I usually wore cropped jeans and short-sleeved tops.

                  Consultancy work in central London. Started out being able to wear whatever we wanted, and expectations gradually got more conservative as I mingled with more senior clients. Got told off for wearing blue tights, wearing a mini skirt, looking generally 'too sexy' (I think that was because of a pair of knee-high boots). Ended up with a wardrobe of a few skirt, jacket, top combinations that no-one found too offensive. Idiotically gave them all away when I put on weight. Would probably fit back in most of it now.

                  Mum uniform: jeans or shorts with enough pockets to hold my wallet, phone and keys (never have enough free hands to hold a handbag). Variety of stained t-shirts.

                  If I need to smarten up now: I have exactly one dress, one jacket, one pair of heels, that serves a multi-purpose function as suitable for a wedding, funeral or job interview. If I ever actually get a job, I'm screwed.

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                    #10
                    I get suits, shirts, proper shoes...but high heels are just so uncomfortable (I suppose, never having worn them, but I've been so informed). And do they really make people more elegant?

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                      #11
                      When we have done this before, we have always concluded that the UK in general and The City in particular are much more conservative in terms of dress than we are on this side of the pond.

                      The idea of an early years teacher wearing a suit would have been seen as eccentric at best when I was in those classes in the early 60s.

                      Balders, there are a number of organisations here (both non profit and commercial) that re-home lightly wore corporate-friendly clothing. I'm sure that they have UK analogues by now.

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                        #12
                        There's infection control procedures in place where I work so "bare below the elbow". Makes it a bit draughty round the old nethers, mind. Badumtish.

                        But seriously, short sleeves are a must. Other than that anything goes. I normally wear grey or black trousers and a grey or black jumper (alternating colours). Although today I wore a blue jumper.

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                          #13
                          Shirt, trousers, shoes, but tie not compulsory - we were told this on day one, but it took me a while to get out of the habit of wearing tie every day. Still wear one when I'm on a white shirts week, but otherwise no tie. Used to wear a suit in previous jobs but very rarely in this one, and during a weight loss transition managed to go some time without the need to wear one until one of my friends got married and I had to buy a new one.

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                            #14
                            I've been in full-time employment for 36 years. Apart from safety shoes, I've always worn what I wanted to wear.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Sporting View Post
                              I get suits, shirts, proper shoes...but high heels are just so uncomfortable (I suppose, never having worn them, but I've been so informed). And do they really make people more elegant?
                              Yes, they are uncomfortable. Yes, sadly, they really do make women look more elegant.

                              I compromise by wearing low heels that are relatively comfortable and only wearing them for the minimum time necessary. I do any commute or walking in trainers and only swap to heels at the door of whichever institution I'm going to. I can do a day indoors in heels as long as I'm not standing all day.

                              The problem with flats is that I find women's smart flat shoes to be more uncomfortable often. Ballet flats are a joke. If they have no strap across the roof of the foot I find it impossible to walk in them. Any woman's shoes that is actually comfortable is correspondingly ugly.

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                                #16
                                In my previous incarnation I wore a uniform and could echo what Balders said about them, now I'm no longer dealing with the public it's anything goes, Polo shirt and jeans generally.

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                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                                  Balders, there are a number of organisations here (both non profit and commercial) that re-home lightly wore corporate-friendly clothing. I'm sure that they have UK analogues by now.
                                  I know there are at least a couple of charities that do this here. I may be employing the services of one soon.

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                                    #18
                                    Early in the semester one of a series of waistcoats made of Nigerian/Ghanaian textiles (bought from an eccentric ex-savile row tailor in Camden Passage.) Shirts are a solid colour, green, orange, red, cream and so on depending on the colour of the waistcoat. Slacks with coloured braces (suspenders) and suede shoes, either red, dark green or orange and khaki. As we move through the classes clothing gets more informal. Jeans, leather jacket, etc. This isn't a code, it's my choice. I teach visual communication so clothing is relevant. Beginning with a traditional (albeit colourful) wardrobe indicates a separation from the students ie: I'm not their friend, but what we'll learn isn't going to be boring. Or that's my thinking.

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                                      #19
                                      Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
                                      Early in the semester one of a series of waistcoats made of Nigerian/Ghanaian textiles (bought from an eccentric ex-savile row tailor in Camden Passage.) Shirts are a solid colour, green, orange, red, cream and so on depending on the colour of the waistcoat. Slacks with coloured braces (suspenders) and suede shoes, either red, dark green or orange and khaki. As we move through the classes clothing gets more informal. Jeans, leather jacket, etc. This isn't a code, it's my choice. I teach visual communication so clothing is relevant. Beginning with a traditional (albeit colourful) wardrobe indicates a separation from the students ie: I'm not their friend, but what we'll learn isn't going to be boring. Or that's my thinking.
                                      Fucking hell.

                                      On the other hand, I can understand why your students don't want to be mates with you.

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                                        #20
                                        Hmmm... in my previous job, for evening concerts, white tie and (evening) tails.... like this

                                        https://www.oliverbrown.org.uk/white...ing-tails.html

                                        Always. Even on a 12-concert tour with not a day off in between..... got a bit smelly in the gents dressing room by the end of the tour I can tell you ;-)

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                                          #21
                                          Almost anything goes in my office, unless there is a meeting with an important project partner. Then you would still get away with a shirt and jeans, but dress pants and a dress shirt are preferred.

                                          The only moment where the dress code gets strict, is when I'm in the committee during a PhD defense. I must wear a dark suit with white shirt, black shoes, and a grey tie. Demands on me are substantially better than those on full professors, who must appear in formal gown and cap, no matter how hot the weather gets.

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                                            #22
                                            I've always wondered if orchestras provide new members with some kind of discount on the required uniform.

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                                              #23
                                              My workplace doesn't have a dress code. We used to have one of those highly nebulous 'smart casual' ones that nobody understood, but we also haven't had a payrise in ten years and the board realised that scrapping the dress code was a cheap way to raise morale and stave off insurrection.

                                              So now I dress exactly the same in the office as on a day off, mostly jeans/t-shirts/jumpers/day dresses with Vans/brogues/DMs. I'm also lucky enough to work from home quite a lot these days, which I normally do in what I guess you'd call 'loungewear' (smartish trackie bottoms, scruffier t-shirts, sweatshirts.) Also glasses because I can't be arsed with contacts if I'm not leaving the house.

                                              Originally posted by Balderdasha View Post
                                              Yes, sadly, they really do make women look more elegant.
                                              I beg to differ.

                                              Any woman's shoes that is actually comfortable is correspondingly ugly.
                                              And with this also. Isn't it great that we all have different tastes though.

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                                                #24
                                                Originally posted by treibeis View Post
                                                Fucking hell.

                                                On the other hand, I can understand why your students don't want to be mates with you.


                                                Ha! I do get feedback. Often on student evals, "Nice shoes!" type of thing. Also corridor comments from other students like "Whoa... cool vest dude!"

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                                                  #25
                                                  ADC rocking the Khalid Muhammed look.
                                                  Very 1980's Public Enemy night of the living baseheads.
                                                  I have always like the cut of your jib man.



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