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Words that you know that make you feel all clever

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  • Nefertiti2
    replied
    And Jeremy Hunt

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  • 3 Colours Red
    replied
    And rhotacism beginning with an 'R'.

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  • WOM
    replied
    And lisp having an 's'.

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  • Bordeaux Education
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    Originally posted by Balderdasha View Post
    Also, hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia, which is the fear of long words. Whoever named that disorder must have been a real arse mustn't he?
    Akin to dyslexia being hard to speak.

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  • Ginger Yellow
    replied
    Originally posted by Diable Rouge View Post
    Sesquipedalian - because brevity is preferable as a rule, as such NS can figure out the definition through opposites.
    This one is my favourite word. Partly because it is so mellifluous, and partly because it is autological - it describes itself.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    In that instance, you're not so much 'misled' as completely in the dark.

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  • Paul S
    replied
    Obfuscation

    If you don't know what the above word means, then that is a very good definition of it, because it means to deliberately mislead.

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  • Balderdasha
    replied
    Another Baader-Meinhof moment for me. I had to look up comorbidity the other day. I thought it meant something like 'increasingly likely to lead to death', but the actual meaning 'presence of one or more conditions in addition to your primary condition' is less scary.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Comorbidity

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  • Mr Cogito
    replied
    Originally posted by Snake Plissken View Post
    Bailiwick. I use it all the time. And some say that Tom Clancy couldn't write literature.
    Bailiwick - as uttered in Deadwood the movie, in a pleasingly serendipitous and timely way.

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  • 3 Colours Red
    replied
    Originally posted by Furtho View Post
    There's also a noun, rhoticity.
    Not to be confused with rhotacism, which is pretty much the opposite.

    Abugida is another one from the field of linguistics I like to throw in occasionally - "a writing system which is between syllabic and alphabetic scripts" i.e. each glyph represents a consonant and a vowel paired.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Schwa is always a good one to throw in.

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  • Furtho
    replied
    Another word I learned via OTF is rhotic: "Relating to or denoting a dialect or variety of English (e.g. in most of the US and south-western England) in which r is pronounced before a consonant (as in "hard") and at the ends of words (as in "far")". There's also a noun, rhoticity.

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  • Guy Profumo
    replied
    Speaking of petrichor, is there an equivalent word for how vibrant colours look when the Sun comes out after the rain?

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  • Felicity, I guess so
    replied
    I have a crossover with an ear worm, in that I learned the word jejune in an English seminar about the same time I 1st heard Spandau Ballet’s “To Cut a Long Story Short” and it rhymes with the 1st line’s ‘lune/lagoon’ and has stayed there ever since.

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  • Furtho
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    Mammiferous is a much nicer description than saying "He/She's got big tits."
    On a somewhat similar note, OTF taught me "callipygian". It might even have been Toby G.
    Last edited by Furtho; 11-06-2019, 06:49.

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Someone was being a show off and asked if anyone knew what Quartodecimenism is. And I did, thanks to my normally useless Bachelor of Divinity (Hons)

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  • Nurse Duckett
    replied
    Originally posted by Giggler View Post

    Is it not the opposite? The smell of the ground when it rains following a dry spell?
    Er, "antonym" - the opposite of a word... Thanks, good spot.

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  • Eggchaser
    replied
    Originally posted by Eggchaser View Post
    Moiety.
    moiety
    /ˈmɔɪɪti/
    noun
    FORMAL•TECHNICAL
    1. each of two parts into which a thing is or can be divided.
      "the tax was to be delivered in two moieties"
      • ANTHROPOLOGY
        each of two social or ritual groups into which a people is divided, especially among Australian Aborigines and some North American Indians.
      • a part or portion, especially a lesser share.
    Usually seen by me in older wills, relating to the split of the residuary estate, often with one moiety going on trust.

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  • hobbes
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post


    We did, though it was only resurrected after the German word became so popular over here.
    That has quite made my day.

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  • Snake Plissken
    replied
    Sorry. I hef a keld.

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  • Vicarious Thrillseeker
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    Mrs. S gets pissed off if I use words like these; she says I'm being an intellectual snob. I left school at sixteen.

    Even though they don't really qualify for this thread, I enjoy using suboptimal, oxymoron, tautology and counterintuitive.
    I just used two of those in a conference call.

    Snake's wrong by the way - it's pronounced 'bailiwick'.

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  • G-Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Guy Profumo View Post
    Epicaricacy - the delight in the misfortune of others.
    Why use a difficult Latin-type word when here's a perfectly good and pronouncable English one in "Schadenfreude".

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  • Duncan Gardner
    replied
    I've come up with a foolproof fundraising scheme.

    Fines for all messaging narrative memes




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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    In college days, I went out with a girl who used that word all the bloody time. Like we needed reminding that we hadn't any money.

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