Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Annoying New York Times articles

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Incandenza
    started a topic Annoying New York Times articles

    Annoying New York Times articles

    The NY Times has a knack of publishing lifestyle or trend articles that make me want to pull my teeth out with a pair of pliers. And yet I can't turn away and I have to read all of them.

    Today's article, in which a bunch of people famous on Twitter and with vague-sounding actual jobs are shown to be MORE COOL THAN YOU:

    ON a rainy Tuesday last month, in an all-white office space in Brooklyn, a blogger known as swissmiss traded productivity tips with some visiting creative strategists. “Our own mini-TED,” she said, half-joking, referring to the high-profile tech conference.

    Across the room, a prodigious young culture curator, whose Brain Pickings blog has managed to attract fans as disparate as Pee-wee Herman and professors from M.I.T., was posting about “must-read books on the art and science of happiness.” Two Web developers from a company called Fictive Kin joked about Russian spammers. A ZZ Top song was playing. The office puppy was napping. A clipboard was going around for lunch orders.

    As a group, the writers, Web designers, illustrators and social media figures who share the Studiomates collective in Dumbo have around a half-million followers on Twitter and many more on their blogs, Foursquare accounts and Facebook pages.

    Yet it’s the offline interaction — the group lunches, the whiteboard brainstorming sessions, the Friday beer parties — that puts Studiomates at the forefront of an innovative new model for doing business.

    It turns out that 140 characters in a Twitter post cannot compete with 26 characters in a Brooklyn loft.

    Five years ago, a group like Studiomates probably wouldn’t have been a group at all but rather two dozen strangers in search of a Wi-Fi signal at Starbucks.

    The 26 members, who each pay $500 a month for a desk, are mostly engaged in independent projects in unrelated fields, and have no practical reason to work together. But as the new media pundit Clay Shirky said at the South by Southwest conference in March, “we systematically overestimate the value of access to information and underestimate the value of access to each other.”

    “Sure, we could all be home doing what we do, but why would we?” Tina Roth Eisenberg (a k a swissmiss) said as her studio mates clacked away at their MacBooks. “I just like being around nerdy creative people all day long. It helps make sense of all the information coming at us.”
    It gets worse.

  • Incandenza
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    Yikes

    What the hell happened over there?
    I have no idea. Saw Matt Pearce share this and other journalists saying how anxious that made them (writing a piece with that many errors), but some of them made me wonder how it got past anyone else before being published. I mean, referring to the National Library of Medicine as a journal title? How did that not get caught?

    And the note at the end makes it clear that a different reporter came in after the initial publication and re-wrote it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Now I really want to read "The Oral History of the Most Erroneous Thing The Post Ever Published."

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by Incandenza View Post
    This article has the most extensive list of corrections that I've ever seen:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...1e9_story.html

    "But apart from that, we stand by every word we wrote".

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Yikes

    What the hell happened over there?

    Leave a comment:


  • Incandenza
    replied
    This article has the most extensive list of corrections that I've ever seen:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...1e9_story.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Femme Folle
    replied
    This Twitter thread was satisfying to read. Grant Stern and others calling out Haberman on her BS.

    https://twitter.com/DavidMDrucker/status/1158840569000603649?s=20

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    They are making money hand over fist

    Leave a comment:


  • Amor de Cosmos
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    I very much hope that someone writes a book on just what has happened to the Times during this Administration. Margaret Sullivan (formerly their Public Editor, now at the Washington Post) would be the obvious candidate, but I somehow doubt many of the most relevant parties would speak to her.

    Some of it is clearly part of their larger mission to become the paper of record for the 1%, and I have been told that some of it has to do with social media and search engine "optimisation", but there is clearly more going on, and it would be interesting to know what that is.
    Aren't they still the "Failing New York Times" they were three years ago?

    Leave a comment:


  • Femme Folle
    replied
    If I ever see Maggie Haberman on the street, it will take all of my strength not to punch her in the face. Or just scream at her, more likely.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by Femme Folle View Post
    Are we playing Jeopardy?

    Name the most Annoying New York Times Articles.

    What is all of them?

    Ding ding ding!
    Some are way worse than others.

    Like so many things in Trumpistan, this topic has turned especially dark. Many of the entries in this thread - most, perhaps - used to be from the Style or Real Estate sections or the Wedding Shit. That could be dismissed as their attempt to secure ad buys from luxury brands and since advertising revenue is cratering, it was kinda hard to begrudge that. And it was kinda entertaining to see rich people make such asses of themselves.

    But now it's clear that many of the most prestigious media sources are out of touch with reality on issues that actually matter. And it's not remotely benign.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Polite media outlets have been full of these defenses of racism, or defenses of the feelings of white people with racist opinions, since Trump’s victory the invention of the printing press. Usually, these defenses are presented as critiques of “identity politics,” or, more daringly, of “diversity.” The Columbia University professor Mark Lilla, who presents himself as a “liberal” (though his résumé suggests otherwise), demonstrated the form in a showcase piece in the Times Sunday Review in mid-November 2016, dismissing the notion that Trump had benefited from a “whitelash,” in which the president-elect was able to “transform economic disadvantage into racial rage”:

    Fixed it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Femme Folle
    replied
    Are we playing Jeopardy?

    Name the most Annoying New York Times Articles.

    What is all of them?

    Ding ding ding!

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Bruno posted this on the gun atrocity thread, but I think it deserves a place here as well.

    https://twitter.com/Slate/status/1158723525877874688

    I very much hope that someone writes a book on just what has happened to the Times during this Administration. Margaret Sullivan (formerly their Public Editor, now at the Washington Post) would be the obvious candidate, but I somehow doubt many of the most relevant parties would speak to her.

    Some of it is clearly part of their larger mission to become the paper of record for the 1%, and I have been told that some of it has to do with social media and search engine "optimisation", but there is clearly more going on, and it would be interesting to know what that is.

    This very good Tom Scocca piece also provides a number of helpful examples.

    https://twitter.com/tomscocca/status/1158224475487428608

    Polite media outlets have been full of these defenses of racism, or defenses of the feelings of white people with racist opinions, since Trump’s victory. Usually, these defenses are presented as critiques of “identity politics,” or, more daringly, of “diversity.” The Columbia University professor Mark Lilla, who presents himself as a “liberal” (though his résumé suggests otherwise), demonstrated the form in a showcase piece in the Times Sunday Review in mid-November 2016, dismissing the notion that Trump had benefited from a “whitelash,” in which the president-elect was able to “transform economic disadvantage into racial rage”:

    Leave a comment:


  • Incandenza
    replied
    It's two of the most annoying things in the world: a NYT fashion article presenting catastrophic climate change as a fashion opportunity, and Burning Man!

    When tens of thousands of people descend on Nevada's Black Rock Desert in August for Burning Man, they should expect dust. A windstorm could sweep through the site at any moment, swirling the highly alkaline playa sand into clouds, and shrouding the festival's temporary city and its attendants under its cloak. It's best to come prepared.

    Vogmask, a reusable face mask with an air filter, was designed with Burners in mind, but is intended to address environmental concerns broadly. When Marc Brown attended Burning Man in 2011, he was disappointed that there were "no cool-looking, highly efficient filtering face masks" to be found on the playa, despite the risk of what Burners have termed "playa lung," an infection caused by the inhalation of alkaline silica dust from the desert.

    So he and his mother, Wendover Brown, decided to make their own, working with medical design engineers to ensure its efficacy. Since founding Vogmask in 2012, they have seen demand rise, not just in the United States but around the world.

    Vogmask is just one in a small but growing category of products designed to help people navigate an increasingly polluted planet.

    Ali Aubuchon, a performance artist and speech language pathologist from New York City, experienced playa lung twiceduring her first three years at Burning Man. She now makes sure to have a mask on at all times in Black Rock City. "It's a place that is not very easy to survive in without the proper supplies," said Ms.Aubuchon, 38, who performs under the name Ali Luminescent.

    Leave a comment:


  • TonTon
    replied
    Capitalism is great.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    https://twitter.com/nytimes/status/1149260810222485504

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruno
    replied
    Giving up alcohol was great for the budget, weight, and overall health. I never miss it, though I was never more than a moderate drinker.

    When I read that Alexander the Great was a heavy drinker, I decided that alcohol must explain how post-Stone Age, pre-gunpowder armies could surrender enough judgment to actually hack each other to bits. You wouldn't have had that with cannabis. Can the Roman Empire best be explained by a series of preemptive wars in the name of national defense, or by the fact that they all got drunk a lot and there was no TV? Didn't the barbarians invade because they wanted their vineyards?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    Not drinking alcohol is not considered strange, no.

    Nor is drinking it in a "café" thought odd, either. I've just made a rough count and within half a kilometre in any direction from where I live there must be more than 50 establishments where you can refresh yourself. If any of these stopped selling booze they'd be out of business overnight,

    It's not that everyone here is an alcoholic (though a worrying number of people are). It's just that while most folk are prepared to get by until the evening on coffee etc. there are many who, for example, will have a beer or wine at 10.30 along with their bocadillo. Very few people will bat an eyelid at this. Even in cafés doubling as bakeries there will always be various alcoholic options behind the counter. But beer and wine here are often hardly considered as alcoholic (even though of course they are!) but more as a refreshment, especially on warm days.

    You also have to consider the café culture here as well. Not many people meet for drinks at home. The bar/café/pub etc. is where the action happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    “Cafe” is a broad term that describes a lot of different kinds of places* but in general I don’t think of cafes as a place primarily to drink alcohol and not drinking alcohol at such a place would not be considered odd, would it?

    Whereas not drinking at a bar or a pub would seem more unusual, I think?

    *As it turns out, the place in this town known as The Cafe (Cafe 210 West, to be precise) is a pretty standard student boozer. Bouncers, pitcher specials, nachos, sketchy bathrooms, etc. But it has a pretty big outdoor seating are so the owners call it a Cafe.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    See also Italy or France.

    The US distinctions are another indication of our weird attitudes towards alcohol.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    I would struggle to think of any cafe here which doesn't sell alcohol.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Why can't people just not drink? Why does it have to become a designated lifestyle with a name and special places to do it* and why does the "tech" industry's take on it matter so much?

    I've all but stopped drinking any alcohol. It's not good for my mental health or diet or finances so I just gave it up. I wasn't doing it much anyway, but now I've really give it up. I suppose it's a challenge in that I can't pretend to get excited about "craft beer" any more, but then if I'm honest with myself, I never really was, so not much of a loss there.

    Aren't places to hang out, hear music and not drink booze called coffee houses or, you know, a cafe? Not a new idea, to say the least.
    Around here, those places but that's not true in major cities, is it?
    Getaway in Brooklyn was comfortably full for a Saturday night, when I came in to try my first "shrub" — an acidic beverage made from vinegar, fruit, sugar, club soda and zero alcohol.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
    I feel unwell. Almost every element of that makes me want to vomit.
    You should probably go with that impulse. You’ll feel better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post

    Well, I'm taxed but can't vote... so...
    They didn’t even really get that right. The one thing they definitely got right was getting rid of royalty and hereditary titles and yet we’ve been trying to restore that system ever since.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X