Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Great Tits

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Originally posted by Various Artist View Post
    Lovely shot TrL, clear as a bell. I'm intrigued though from your description – were those lifetime ticks, or Martin Mere ticks for you? I find it hard to imagine you've never seen a great crested grebe nor avocet before.
    No, lifetime ticks - I don't go birding (except the occasional trip to Martin Mere), I just like to go places that tend to have plenty of wildlife and find out what it is that I'm gawping at. I've not been to Martin Mere at this time of year before, hence the range of species is different from when I've been in autumn.

    Comment


      How do I upload a .mov file saved on my imgur?

      Comment


        Not sure, sorry Sits - you need a techy for that.

        Meanwhile, here's a Wren. Not the most exciting or rarest of birds, but they're buggers to get photos of as they never seem to stay still long enough.

        Comment




          Goldcrest at our garden feeder.

          Comment


            From the size of him or her I'd say that they need to lay off the fat balls for day or two! Looks fit to burst.

            Comment


              Look at that! The two smallest in the British Isles* one after the other, and what exquisite photos.

              *yeah I know, the Firecrest.

              Comment


                Even without seeking them out we’ve seen some interesting birds on our exercise outings: Holywell Dene on Sunday we watched a dipper on the river then saw an acrobatic nuthatch on some bird feeders along with the full range of tits.
                Yesterday at St Mary’s island the tide had just gone in quite strongly and a huge crowd of gulls were very agitated, when we got closer we saw that a group of eider were amongst them and repeatedly jabbing at them.

                Comment


                  Given that we've had next to nothing in our garden/back yard since I moved up here and not for the lack of trying (apart from one blackbird), we now appear to have a pair of Dunnocks which must be nesting close by and are regular visitors each morning. They're keeping me slightly sane with everything else going on.

                  Comment


                    Slightly distant shot of the great crested grebes at Martin Mere last weekend.

                    Comment


                      I love your wren picture just up the page TrL. I was amazed to learn only recently that they're the very commonest bird in the UK – I thought I must've misheard or misinterpreted to start with, but no apparently there's about 7 million of them in this country. It's just that they're so small and shy and secretive and quick-moving, you simply don't see them most of the time like you do with robins, blackbirds, tits, corvids etc. etc. So it's terrific you managed to get such a good photo!


                      And glad you've added those great crested grebes and avocet to your lifetime list. Beautiful birds both. The reason I was surprised was because they're quite large and striking species, which I seem to have been stumbling across them at random in any kind of wetland-like environment as long as I can remember (e.g. in my part of South Wales called Cosmeston Lakes, where a couple of old limestone quarry pits naturally filled in with water in the 1970s and the area was consequently made into a public country park, and you only have to stroll across the bridge between the lakes to have a decent chance of spying a grebe or two out on the water), so it startled me that you could have missed them altogether previously!

                      It's only looking up their range now, though, that I remember how peripheral the avocet's population still is. I'm just lucky to have been going over to north Norfolk all my life, which happens to be somewhere where they're always visible, and they winter down in south Wales, so it doesn't strike me as a hard-to-see bird – but I get that this isn't the whole picture of course.

                      Of course, go back a few decades and it would've been a very different picture again. The avocet is, after all, the symbol of the RSPB because it was so very rare at the time they decided to use it as their logo, and it's been a real conservation success story since. Ironically it was an accident at first: they'd been extinct here for a century when the flooding of coastal marshes in the 1940s as a defence against invasion inadvertently created the habitat for them to recolonise.

                      Comment


                        Absolutely. The Avocet was like the Red Kite in my youth as two of the Big Ticks. I did see Dartford Warblers, in the New Forest once during my brief period going on RSPB trips in my teens. Back then they were Britain​​​​​​’s rarest bird.

                        And as for the commonest, I’m surprised to learn it’s the Wren. We were always told it was the Blackbird. A pair for every garden, my Dad used to say. In fairness that was forty years ago.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X