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    Supposed to be some gaps in the cloud tonight. Fingers crossed.

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      The station is in fact now back into another phase of regular visible passes, at least from where I am in south Wales: e.g. according to my app there should be a super one at 11:14 tonight then again on the next orbit at 12:51am. Then tomorrow night 10:26pm,12:03 am and 1:40am all look very good too, while Sunday evening has promising ones at 9:38, 11:25 and 0:52, and so on – these are all long passes (6 or 7 minutes) right across the top of the sky or at least pretty high up.
      From where you are (i.e. a similar latitude albeit perhaps 150 miles east of me) there should be good views too at pretty much the same times.
      Annoyingly About a week ago there was a Jupiter, Saturn, ISS conjunction which I couldn’t see because of the interminable blanket of cloud this summer has produced.

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        Originally posted by Various Artist View Post
        Great stuff, happy gazing. Give the comet a while if you have no luck tonight, it should get better both later into the night and further into the month. I haven't spied it yet as the clouds have been against me so far, but here's hoping.

        I saw the ISS simply loads of times in late May I think it was; I'd never known it make so many good passes over so many nights before, though the fact it came during a very warm clear spell obviously helped loads with the viewing.
        I've got a great app on my (Android) phone, ISS Live Now, which has the live camera views of earth from the space station, occasional live feeds of spacewalks and interior activity, also shows me NASA's footage of rocket launches and the like – and now includes an 'ISS detector' that notifies me of upcoming visible passes and has a 'radar' image to help you see where in the sky it's going to appear and where the track will go, which turns live when it actually crosses your horizon.

        Before that I used to just use NASA's Spot The Station page to tell me when and where to look, and there's a bunch of other websites that'll similarly help. I love watching the ISS go over whenever I get a chance to see it – it never fails to make me boggle, as it's both an amazing spectacle on its own merits and a continual headtrip that there's actually humans up there on that little light.
        Thanks, didn't know that those exist. Turns out that I missed a perfect chance to see it Wednesday night.

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          You're welcome Inca. Yes, it's predictable almost to the second when and where it'll show up, so if you're forearmed there'll always be a chance. It usually goes through spells of making visible passes over a series of nights before vanishing from view for a month or two, presumably thanks to a quirk (but a fairly steady one) of the way its orbits gradually vary.

          And hobbes, keep your eyes peeled for any upcoming ISS pass significantly after midnight, because by about 1 am the Jupiter and Saturn pairing are pretty well up and visible (cloud permitting) from the UK at present. So, while the station might not pass right by in their direction on any given showing, it should certainly be visible in the sky at the same time.


          Just been out trying to do some comet-spotting, but clouds are still not quite clearing enough here. I think it's already past perihelion though so will be getting a little dimmer towards the end of the month, ergo sooner will be better preferably so I'm going to have another peek in a bit...

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            Just glimpsed the comet twice a few minutes ago, for maybe 30 seconds in total, but alas the clouds closed right back in again! Did at least see the ISS go over while I was out there, purely by accident, so that was a nice bonus at least. Maybe tomorrow night the weather will be with me.

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              Nice and clear here but couldn't see the comet.

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                Oh I do plenty of ISS watching VA. It's just that particular conjunction would have been cool.

                In fact the first time I saw the ISS was it transiting the Sun through my solar telescope.

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                  I did manage to get a fairly OK view of Neowise last night through binoculars. The problem is my house is on the side of a hill near the top so my view south is spectacular, but to the north the houses over the road are higher up, so block quite a bit of the Northern sky.
                  Luckily the comet was between two houses so I got a look.
                  Annoyingly I then couldn't find it with my small telescope (it wasn't naked eye visible and my optical spotting scope is configured for Bessie, my big scope.) so I couldn't get any pics.
                  It wasn't a total loss though, I just went round the back and had a look at Jupiter and Saturn for a bit.

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                    Hobbes there, rehearsing his explanation to the police who turn up asking questions about a bloke out at night peering at his neighbours' houses with a pair of binoculars.

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                      Can you imagine if I'd been using Bessie?

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                        Originally posted by hobbes View Post
                        I did manage to get a fairly OK view of Neowise last night through binoculars. The problem is my house is on the side of a hill near the top so my view south is spectacular, but to the north the houses over the road are higher up, so block quite a bit of the Northern sky.
                        Luckily the comet was between two houses so I got a look.
                        Annoyingly I then couldn't find it with my small telescope (it wasn't naked eye visible and my optical spotting scope is configured for Bessie, my big scope.) so I couldn't get any pics.
                        It wasn't a total loss though, I just went round the back and had a look at Jupiter and Saturn for a bit.

                        If only it was Uranus rather than Jupiter and Saturn in the last sentence.
                        Last edited by Nocturnal Submission; 18-07-2020, 22:48.

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                          "I like to get it out at night and extend it to its max-"

                          "Cuff him, Constable, I've heard enough"

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                            It's all about the girth.

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                              "Ooooooooo - I remember the windows rattling at the time...": https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-53993937

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                                https://twitter.com/BBCBreaking/status/1305525282674216962

                                Apparently, the phosphine levels detected in the Venusian atmosphere are more consistent with production by microbial life, rather than natural processes, though that doesn't exclude other processes, similarly to the Martian meteorite in the Nineties.

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                                  "Phosphane" <pedant - IUPAC name>

                                  (no wonder I'd no idea what it was supposed to be)


                                  Also a by-product / pollutant from industrialusation


                                  An ancient technologically advanced society now extinct leaving evidence of its existence? *


                                  * no. It isn't

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                                    Guy Profumo, wished young ShortyMedlocke a happy free-travelcard day yet?

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                                      Originally posted by Gangster Octopus View Post
                                      Guy Profumo, wished young ShortyMedlocke a happy free-travelcard day yet?
                                      Given he didn't wish me a free prescriptions day, what do you think?

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                                        This is a big fucking deal, by the way. It's not a smoking gun, but it's a big step towards finding extraterrestrial life. The scientists involved must be absolutely blown away.

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                                          I'm still pretty skeptical it's life, though hopefully it will generate lots of missions to Venus to further test the hypothesis. I mean, we don't even no what the biological process is that creates it, and we've already detected it on other worlds, in lower quantities. I know they claim to have eliminated known abiological mechanisms, but just a priori it seems far more likely that it's an unknown chemical process or some countervailing factor preventing it from breaking down (Venus is pretty weird and hasn't been explored much), than it is biology.
                                          Last edited by Ginger Yellow; 15-09-2020, 11:36.

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                                            It's life, Jim, but not as we know it.

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                                              Arthur C Clarke (I think) long speculated about the possibility of life existing in a "habitable zone" layer inside the gas giants. The idea of entirely airborne species is pretty mind-blowing for us land-dwellers but in context it's no more preposterous than, say, fish.

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                                                Robert Zubrin and Elon Musk "We must go to mars to try and discover life on another planet"

                                                Some guys in hawaii, "We can see it from here!!!"

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