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    Originally posted by TonTon View Post
    I mean, "am" and "arm" are different, and the difference sound to me like an r. I don't know what rhotic means, mind.
    When I first saw the tweet I thought to myself that I obviously say the r, sing your same am arm logic but then I realised that I'm saying something closer to aam, with just a little hint of r on the second a as opposed to a stereotypical west country arrm.

    Sound files! https://dictionary.cambridge.org/pro...on/english/arm with UK and US arms.

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      Originally posted by Balderdasha View Post
      It's the difference between ahm and arrrm, or talking like a pirate, yes. Do the words alms and arms sound the same when you say them?
      Totes the sameballs, absolutely. Talking like a pirate makes sense, I will form now on translate "rhotic" to that in my head. And out loud at times, for the lolz.

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        The Xinjiang Data Project has released a map documenting the impact of Communist policies in the region, highlighting the erection of detention camps, and the destruction of mosques and cultural centres.

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          https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...droidApp_Other

          This article has some lovely maps in it.

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            Rhotic means you pronounce the "r" in words like arm, hard, far.
            To me I most associate this (in English) with Scottish people, even though I'm from the South West (just) - too young, apparently, not something I get to say often these days.

            edit: I mean pronounce it as an "r" rather than just using it to change how the vowel sounds, which is how am vs arm in most English (in England) dialects changes.
            I think somebody on here posted a link some months ago (or maybe I just saw it on FB) to a historical dialect map comparison of England, showing how rhotic dialects were common in many parts of England 50 or 60 years ago, but have now more or less died out as the non-rhotic version from the rest of England has taken over.

            Isn't there some US division as well, with the Harvard pronunciation of "I parked my car in Harvard Yard" sounding pretentious to most US listeners? Not sure how rhotism features in that divide.

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              Why would anyone pronounce extra letters? My local accent seems determined to get rid of as many letters as possible. So, "salt" becomes "so", "thoughtful" becomes "forful", and "Do you know what I mean" becomes "narmi?"

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                It's on the previous page.

                The baseball park maps reminded me of the Football Grounds book and Wisden had a book covering all of the 1st class grounds in England and Wales. I'm not sure all the cricket ones had plans though.

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