Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The WTF? Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fussbudget
    replied
    The erratum at the bottom of Denise Johnson's obituary in the Guardian is a real doozy:

    This article was amended on 27 July 2020 to replace the main image. A captioning error in photos supplied by an agency led us to publish a picture that was not of Johnson as claimed. It was further amended to correct the incorrect assertion that Johnson sang on Higher Than the Sun, to remove a video showing that song, and to correct Johnson’s age and date of birth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nefertiti2
    replied
    What I take from that article.

    Housing is very expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    Google images brings up a few examples of such fish tanks but they may be peculiar to Scotland as I never encountered it.

    They are more common in Chinese restaurants and maybe they crossed over to some Indian restaurants from there.
    Last edited by Satchmo Distel; 26-07-2020, 19:23.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Are fish tanks common in Indian restaurants in the UK?

    They are a fixture in old school Chinese restaurants here, and in Milano there was a Chinese restaurant that had a huge tank under the glass floor of a raised dining area. But I don't recall ever seeing one in an Indian restaurant.

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    This may not actually be a WTF story, as there are disappointingly few details. But it could also very much be WTF.

    https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news...tank-incident/

    Leave a comment:


  • S. aureus
    replied
    Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post
    Yeah, a commune sounds nice if you had just the right group of people and could agree on the rules. It’s hard to do.
    I'm pretty sure that it's virtually impossible to avoid having at least one person who will make the whole thing miserable for everybody else involved.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by WOM View Post
    We pass a place just south of Ellicottville called Duckville Park. It's basically 6 mobile homes arranged in a semi-circle, with flowers in the middle. A striking combination of sad and rather quaint.
    Some places aren’t so bad, if the landlord isn’t a greedy dick and/or the residents own the place as a coop.

    Some mobile homes are well-made, but of course a lot aren’t.

    It’s just another example of how expensive it is to be poor in this stupid country.

    Leave a comment:


  • WOM
    replied
    Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
    The Mercedes Sprinter thing has definitely become a Thing. Two of my cycling companions (rich and old, definitely not the target demographic) have bought Sprinters and done them up inside to be, basically, more drivabe RVs. It seems to cost a bloody fortune, but there are a bunch of workshops who're now kitting these things out.
    The guy next door at the cottage - 60, fit, outdoorsy kayaker type - retired last year and just bought a MB Sprinter for @$100K. Plus a trailer for his bikes, kayaks, etc to take along. I have no doubt he'll get a lot of use out of it, and he sold his engineering outfit for a mirthful, so I'm sure it didn't make much of a dent in his finances.

    Leave a comment:


  • WOM
    replied
    We pass a place just south of Ellicottville called Duckville Park. It's basically 6 mobile homes arranged in a semi-circle, with flowers in the middle. A striking combination of sad and rather quaint.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by WOM View Post
    It's eye opening, when you drive around the US, how many 'non Florida' type mobile home parks there are. I don't hate the idea upthread, but I think a lot of the residents would aggravate you pretty quickly.
    There used to be several around Stats College, but they’re gradually all being redeveloped into shopping centers, etc.
    In one case, they evicted everyone and cleared the land, but it’s still empty years later while the owners figure out how they’re going to develop it.

    It sucks for those people, because there really aren’t many options for affordable housing near town. They’ll have to move many miles away and commute. That just deepens the class divide and creates more resentment, I suspect.

    There’s definitely a bubble on student apartments and the pandemic is making it more likely that will pop. That could mean that more of the apartments not so close to downtown become cheaper and available to families, but I don’t know if it’s that simple.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Yeah, a commune sounds nice if you had just the right group of people and could agree on the rules. It’s hard to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • MsD
    replied
    It's both.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    That's not a glamavan, that's a lovenest.

    Leave a comment:


  • MsD
    replied
    Well, it had to show as a TV image and not a wall picture. I love the glamavan. It’s made me think I could live in one.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Intriguing choice of television image

    Leave a comment:


  • MsD
    replied
    My landlady has a caravan in the garden here, which she lets from time to time. She bought it from a gypsy in a field for a tenner, dragged it here and made it beautiful.

    Leave a comment:


  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    The Mercedes Sprinter thing has definitely become a Thing. Two of my cycling companions (rich and old, definitely not the target demographic) have bought Sprinters and done them up inside to be, basically, more drivabe RVs. It seems to cost a bloody fortune, but there are a bunch of workshops who're now kitting these things out.

    Leave a comment:


  • WOM
    replied
    It's eye opening, when you drive around the US, how many 'non Florida' type mobile home parks there are. I don't hate the idea upthread, but I think a lot of the residents would aggravate you pretty quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • slackster
    replied
    Part of me quite likes the concept of exclusive, boho transient camper van living (with urban chic facilities, a cereal cafe and good wifi). But then part of me also quite likes the idea of a monastry - apart from the never-ending praying malarky - and commune/squat life. Though I suspect I wont ever be following through on any of these things, even if I did once signed up for a spell on a kibbutz in my salad days.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Not necessarily. Even if one’s primary interest in a place is just to have place to live, it’s better for the resident if they can build equity than not. It’s fine to be a renter, but renters have a lot more flexibility.

    Having to come up with a bunch of money to buy a home that doesn’t retain value and pay rent to a landlord that will kick you out as soon as a developer offers a better price for the land is a tough spot to be in.

    But trailer parks are largely how the US does “affordable housing” in many areas.

    https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5...b0615b0818ae80

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post

    Trailer parks are a bad deal for the residents. Their houses depreciate in value.
    They're a bad deal if property is seen as an investment first and foremost.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Intentional communities are fine. But not for somebody else to skim profits from.

    Trailer parks are a bad deal for the residents. Their houses depreciate in value.

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
    I was about to start with critiquing this, but there are just too many WTFs about the whole story. Intentional Communities? Tentrr and Hipcamp? And, jesus, so much bullshit techspeak with so little substance...

    we’re making a bet that the future of cities is electric, autonomous, distributed, renewable and user-generated
    I agree in very large part. But intentional communities are a thing - I knew someone 20 years ago who lived in one and I actually studied them for a bit back then (and if I had the time I'd like to study them further as I find the concept fascinating - I'm not convinced of their sustainability, but that's sort of what I'd like to find out).

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    I was about to start with critiquing this, but there are just too many WTFs about the whole story. Intentional Communities? Tentrr and Hipcamp? And, jesus, so much bullshit techspeak with so little substance...

    we’re making a bet that the future of cities is electric, autonomous, distributed, renewable and user-generated

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X