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  • Levin
    replied
    [URL="https://twitter.com/eilidhmax/status/1184610499478077440?s=03"]https://twitter.com/eilidhmax/status/1184610499478077440[/URL]

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  • Amor de Cosmos
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post


    Funnily enough there's a new BBC travelogue series set in the Americas. In the very first programme the host, who had started in Alaska and then come down through Canada, finished by walking alongside an innocent-looking fence in BC, pointing out that it was the US-Canada border and yelling over to a guy on the other side who said that he has to forewarn the US border authorities when he wants to mow his lawn, which abuts the fence. The high tech infrastructure was pointed out. I wondered if it was where Amor lived.
    It's not impossible. Though I've never heard of anyone having to get permission to mow his lawn. People walk across the border all the time, usually unknowingly (note the story linked in that article about the young French woman.) But it's pretty impossible to drive across it by mistake, unless you're in a dune buggy on a beach. Moving the family to PA is extreme. The furthest I've heard of is Seattle (that's what US border guards scare kids with if they're caught crossing illegally.) There is a fair amount of tech in the ground and the bushes, on the Canadian side too. There's a "hidden" camera in our off-leash dog park (to catch people trying to escape from Point Roberts, WA). We always wave as we walk by.

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  • Nefertiti2
    replied
    https://twitter.com/askforcawmbyok/status/1184526514576150535?s=20

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by Flynnie View Post
    I have a geeky fascination with borders and I smelt a rat in the Connors family story right away. It's just impossible to swerve onto a country road in BC and end up in...another country. There's literally no road in western BC that does that. Everything has a customs post attached to it.

    Even taking it to a logical extreme, a mountain of dead deer or moose blocking both sides of a road, at worst you would be crawling slowly over a ditch onto the US side and then reentering Canada in the space of a few seconds. CBP and the Washington state police aren't going to be able to do anything about that.

    The 16K in cash, the visa denials, and the arrest just a few hundred yards from a customs post (so they had to know they were crossing the border) just highlight that. Oh, and Canada refused to readmit them. Shady.
    Yeah, though the Google earth images WOM linked show no fence between the two sides of the road.

    I've been to the bit of the Boundary Waters where the border runs through a few lakes and along a portage. They don't mind anyone canoeing or walking across the border as long as you don't camp on the side you didn't start on. If you do want to do that, there's a process to get a remote border crossing permit. Still, I think it could be a fun way to smuggle relatively cheap prescription drugs across. The chances of seeing a ranger or any kind of law enforcement out there is very small.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Before I got to "Hobby Lobby," I thought there'd be a good Indiana Jones joke there, but alas. It's just awful. Apparently a lot of their collection of Bible stuff was acquired through less-than-admirable methods, which would be expected from somebody with their understanding of the Bible.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    [URL="https://twitter.com/ebruenig/status/1184565560379662337?s=21"]https://twitter.com/ebruenig/status/1184565560379662337[/URL]

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  • Flynnie
    replied
    I have a geeky fascination with borders and I smelt a rat in the Connors family story right away. It's just impossible to swerve onto a country road in BC and end up in...another country. There's literally no road in western BC that does that. Everything has a customs post attached to it.

    Even taking it to a logical extreme, a mountain of dead deer or moose blocking both sides of a road, at worst you would be crawling slowly over a ditch onto the US side and then reentering Canada in the space of a few seconds. CBP and the Washington state police aren't going to be able to do anything about that.

    The 16K in cash, the visa denials, and the arrest just a few hundred yards from a customs post (so they had to know they were crossing the border) just highlight that. Oh, and Canada refused to readmit them. Shady.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by WOM View Post
    Should you be interested, my wife had me read Seven Fallen Feathers by Tanya Talaga, about the deaths of 7 native kids in Thunder Bay where they were attending school. It sort of sums up Canada's 'Indian problem' in one short, gripping read.
    Cheers, noted.

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  • WOM
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post
    (Canada didn't come out looking too good, unfortunately. Social and environmental issues aren't ignored in these programmes and the polluting Alberta tar sands operation, the disappearance of indigenous women in the West and the opioid abuse epidemic, with particular reference to Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, were all featured.)
    Yeah, we have more than a few issue. Most of them seem to figure around our maltreatment (or simply neglect) of our native peoples. MMIWG (Missing or Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls) and the residential schools system is a blight on our reputation. And the tar sands are a disgrace and one of our deadly 'third rails', politically speaking.

    Should you be interested, my wife had me read Seven Fallen Feathers by Tanya Talaga, about the deaths of 7 native kids in Thunder Bay where they were attending school. It sort of sums up Canada's 'Indian problem' in one short, gripping read.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    Each of those alleged principles is applied rather selectively in practice, of course

    I'm sure.

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by WOM View Post

    Same. On the face of it, 'innocent family makes wrong turn and ends up in US' sounds fair. Then you read that it was at 9PM, on what can only be characterized as a very remote road on the Canada side that happens to run parallel to a very remote road on the US side...separated by a ditch or gully. They had a ton of cash on them, and the 'refused entry just last year' thing gives it a whole new dynamic.

    This is what it looks like, btw.

    https://www.google.com/maps/search/b.../data=!3m1!1e3

    Funnily enough there's a new BBC travelogue series set in the Americas. In the very first programme the host, who had started in Alaska and then come down through Canada, finished by walking alongside an innocent-looking fence in BC, pointing out that it was the US-Canada border and yelling over to a guy on the other side who said that he has to forewarn the US border authorities when he wants to mow his lawn, which abuts the fence. The high tech infrastructure was pointed out. I wondered if it was where Amor lived.

    (Canada didn't come out looking too good, unfortunately. Social and environmental issues aren't ignored in these programmes and the polluting Alberta tar sands operation, the disappearance of indigenous women in the West and the opioid abuse epidemic, with particular reference to Vancouver's Downtown Eastside, were all featured.)

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Each of those alleged principles is applied rather selectively in practice, of course

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  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    They are each very informative as to the true nature of the "Special Relationship" under this Administration, I'm afraid.

    And should give pause to Brexiteers banking on a "great deal" from the US (but no doubt will not).

    Yes, perhaps. I think many in the UK assume that, as our countries have such close ties, in cases such as these common decency and compassion should apply and be generously applied. OTOH, I think it's recognised over here that the US is fiercely protective of both its citizens, in relation to the actions of other countries at least, and very obviously of its borders. So I'm not sure that we're hugely surprised.
    Last edited by Nocturnal Submission; 16-10-2019, 14:42.

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  • WOM
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post
    The original story seemed to suggest an overreaction and poor treatment by the US authorities but the new information has given the story a different slant.
    Same. On the face of it, 'innocent family makes wrong turn and ends up in US' sounds fair. Then you read that it was at 9PM, on what can only be characterized as a very remote road on the Canada side that happens to run parallel to a very remote road on the US side...separated by a ditch or gully. They had a ton of cash on them, and the 'refused entry just last year' thing gives it a whole new dynamic.

    This is what it looks like, btw.

    https://www.google.com/maps/search/b.../data=!3m1!1e3

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    They are each very informative as to the true nature of the "Special Relationship" under this Administration, I'm afraid.

    And should give pause to Brexiteers banking on a "great deal" from the US (but no doubt will not).

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    No, though I was thinking of raising it. Neither side's story strikes me as the unvarnished truth. Amor may have some local knowledge.

    We also haven't discussed the diplomatic immunity row arising from the vehicular manslaughter of Harry Dunn (which the President tried to turn into reality television yesterday).

    The former story I only read about yesterday and it isn't particularly high profile over here. The original story seemed to suggest an overreaction and poor treatment by the US authorities but the new information has given the story a different slant.

    The latter is a huge issue in the UK, leading news reports and on the front pages of the newspapers.
    Last edited by Nocturnal Submission; 16-10-2019, 14:22.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    No, though I was thinking of raising it. Neither side's story strikes me as the unvarnished truth. Amor may have some local knowledge.

    We also haven't discussed the diplomatic immunity row arising from the vehicular manslaughter of Harry Dunn (which the President tried to turn into reality television yesterday).

    Leave a comment:


  • WOM
    replied
    Are we discussing this incident anywhere else? The two British families that entered the US illegally and got sent to a detention center in PA?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...ion-detention/

    It's a weird story. Sounds like US abuse of power on the face of it. But apparently two of the people applied for, and we denied, US Visas last year...so it looks like maybe they were trying to slip in to the country. And 'we drove through a ditch to avoid an animal' seems a bit suspicious as an excuse. What kind of animal needs cross-country travel to avoid?

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  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    Waiting for the End Of Time...

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I'm on the mom's side.

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  • Tactical Genius
    replied
    Words fail me.
    https://metro.co.uk/2019/10/15/mum-s...cone-10919408/

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  • Guy Profumo
    replied
    Yep.

    This belongs here...

    "Apple turned me Gay"...

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-49933003

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    https://twitter.com/HeerJeet/status/1179792905550143488

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  • Wouter D
    replied
    Originally posted by Guy Profumo View Post
    Was a rear facing camera anyway, wasn't it?
    They reverse course in the middle of the footage, so if you would be right, they would initially drive backwards towards the fireball. They also drive over an upright written speed limit (70) on the asphalt, so I don't think it was a rear facing camera.

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  • Ginger Yellow
    replied
    They should bring out a range for the Argentine market. 'DEFAULT,' 'CURRENCY CONTROLS', 'DEVALUATION', that sort of thing.
    Just get a haircut. Job done.

    Leave a comment:

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