Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The WTF? Thread

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    EEG, the process in the US is the same. One can apply for re-instatement, but it is very rarely done and even more rarely granted. Also note that this is a state law matter in the US. One is admitted to the Bar of one or more states and they are the ones who make the decisions in this respect.

    The transcripts are indeed damming for Caplan (and many of the others charged).

    Comment


      Originally posted by Evariste Euler Gauss View Post

      You must have a different case in mind, Janik. There is no shortage of striking off cases. The one I have in mind was where a solicitor was struck off for avoiding his fare a few score times on his London to Redhill commute. No other offence was involved:

      https://www.legalcheek.com/2019/01/j...er-qualifying/
      I think Janik must have been thinking of this case, which is also what I thought you were referring to. But as it turns out that one was not a solicitor but a "senior executive".

      Comment


        Most Florida story ever?
        Mayor Dale Massad was arrested when he opened fire on a SWAT team that had come to arrest him on charges of practicing medicine out of his home without a license. Sheriff Chris Nocco said Massad was a violent drug user who kept a stash of weapons in his home, had had previous run-ins with the law and lost his medical license 25 years ago after a three year old patient died.

        After the mayor was arrested in this shootout the state also announced an insurance fraud investigation. Governor Ron DeSantis then suspended Massad from office and replaced him with Vice Mayor Terance Rowe. The new acting mayor criticized how the Sheriff’s office had treated his predecessor but conceded that Massad was “not a perfect role model.”

        Now Rowe has been arrested for obstruction of justice, conspiracy to obstruct justice and using a two-way communications device to facilitate the commission of a crime.

        Comment


          Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
          EEG, the process in the US is the same. One can apply for re-instatement, but it is very rarely done and even more rarely granted. Also note that this is a state law matter in the US. One is admitted to the Bar of one or more states and they are the ones who make the decisions in this respect.

          The transcripts are indeed damming for Caplan (and many of the others charged).
          "Ruh-Roh!"
          Last edited by The Awesome Berbaslug!!!; 14-03-2019, 12:45.

          Comment


            My client has been considering a move into voice acting, and was merely demonstrating her knowledge of the Wacky Races canon in light of a rumoured revival.

            The fundamental problem that the defendants face here is that they are unlikely to be able to provide any information that is useful to the prosecution in terms of other charges. Assuming that they can't somehow exclude the tapes (an issue that hundreds of thousands of USD are likely to be spent on), they can only fall back on the not insignificant advantages available to rich white people without criminal records in our criminal "justice" system.

            Comment


              Comment


                So there's a mayoral opening in Florida. Hmmm...

                Comment


                  Unless you're going to pretend to be the reincarnation of Rob Ford, I don't think they'll be interested.

                  Comment


                    "EBIT macht frei"

                    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47566898

                    Is he going to get away with just an apology?

                    Comment


                      It appears so.

                      Rather amazingly to me given my own experience of German board meetings, reports note that no one found the "pun" distasteful at the time it was made.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                        Not to mention the fact that his firm now has to wonder what kind of exposure he might have been creating for them in his work for clients (they will have gotten calls from their malpractice carriers yesterday). Part of the suspension is that he has been disappeared from their website.
                        "Exposure" is such a great legal term. It's almost a euphemism in cases like this.


                        Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                        Reed, I agree with all of that, but would note that a big name degree can also be very helpful to someone who doesn't want to rely on their family's network and go in a different direction (though it never hurts to have that to fall back on if things go south). And as you note, the situation can differ a lot by field. Law, banking, consulting, publishing, journalism and (perhaps more strangely) Hollywood comedy writing are all very credential driven. A lot of other equally or more lucrative professions are not.
                        Yeah, that's true too. In a way, that's what I did, though not to the degree that you did. (Both my parents have multiple degrees and three of my four grandparents did and I'm not as smart as you are nor was my college as incredibly hard to get into).I went off into directions that my family knew nothing about largely because I was lucky enough to have mind-expanding, horizon-broadening educational experiences in college and, to a lesser extent, in grad school. In the classroom, though. Not so much the social or extra curricular stuff.

                        And credentials are especially important in some fields, especially in those where there's an obscene amount of money or fame to be had and the employers need a simple way to narrow down their applicant pool. That is, to a large extent, what a credential is for. The old-fashioned apprenticeship/personal relationship system - which once applied to law, journalism, business, and even medicine, I suppose - just doesn't scale up to our modern economy that well. Employers want to put the risks of investing in education on the employee.

                        But in most fields, regardless of credentials, sooner or later you're going to have to walk the walk. My understanding is that in big fancy law firms, for example, a big percentage of the associates wash out even though they probably all went to top law schools and had excellent grades. If one's job involves sales commissions or hard performance numbers (hedge funds perhaps?) then you're going to have to get it done, regardless of where you went to school. And for every Conan O'Brien or Doug Kenney that wrote for the Harvard Lampoon, there are probably many more who never made it in comedy. (or maybe they just took one of those cush Goldman jobs that Bruno talks about). The degree can only get you so far.

                        I don't know about Wall Street. I imagine they hire a lot of extremely talented Type A quants who went to elite schools because that's what those kinds of people do. Whether they really needed that kind of education to be that good at their jobs, I don't know. And maybe there are also a lot of jobs for not-especially motivated or talented people. I kinda suspect a lot of PR jobs are like that, but relating to the public is a skill of its own.

                        But these parents that think that just getting into the right school is what it's all about are in for a rude shock. They'd be better off spending their money on tutors or maybe those "post-grad" years at private schools and what not. Or maybe just give their kid some money to make his demo or whatever and let him/her learn from failure.

                        Or, better yet, spend quality time with one's kids and help them develop into mature, functioning, compassionate human beings. Crazy thought, I know.

                        That was my long-winded point.


                        Bruno wrote: I saw enough Ivy students of unexceptional ability with rich parents who were there to drink a lot before "transferring seamlessly" to a Goldman job to be repelled. The degree of self-congratulation was nauseating, and I'm not sure the opportunities those schools provide for the honest hardworking types offsets the distortions they're perpetuating.

                        That may be true, but I suspect most of the distortion is happening at younger ages because wealthy parents can afford private schools and/or to live in the districts of good public schools, and they can afford all kinds of opportunities that lower-income people cannot. And if your parents are educated, you're more likely to be exposed to books and ideas and standard English grammar and all kinds of other advantages. Even the SAT - perhaps especially the SAT - can be gamed without actually cheating.

                        Despite all of their financial aid and outreach efforts, the proportion of Ivy League students - and, to a lesser extent, universities overall - who went to private high schools is way higher than the US population overall. And of course, all of those private schools tout how many of their students are on financial aid, but a huge proportion - perhaps most - are paying the full boat or near it. We need to spend a lot more on education, spread those dollars more equitably, and maybe even ban private schools. The first two are going to be hard, the last is probably impossible.


                        Last edited by Hot Pepsi; 14-03-2019, 16:26.

                        Comment


                          Roughly 90% of "Big Law" associates wash out. The investment banking numbers are roughly the same.

                          Comment


                            The private schools are essentially college prep schools, i.e. the demand for them is fundamentally driven by the elite university end goal. So I would still say that it's the latter (in tandem with capitalism) that's causing the distortion.

                            Comment


                              Is the SAT just a series of multiple choice questions, or is there any essay writing/complex maths problem element to it?

                              Comment


                                It always had an English test that was multiple choice and a Maths test, and an essay element was added relatively recently. Each of these is scored separately.

                                Comment


                                  I think they ditched the writing part. I could be wrong, but I thought I heard that.

                                  Comment


                                    Originally posted by Bruno View Post
                                    The private schools are essentially college prep schools, i.e. the demand for them is fundamentally driven by the elite university end goal. So I would still say that it's the latter (in tandem with capitalism) that's causing the distortion.
                                    They’re all part of the same racket.

                                    Comment


                                      Ditching the writing part? Wow. I find it kinda mad that a multiple choice exam can decide yer future at that age. Ditto maths/science questions that don't allow for showing your working. There's surely some credit to be given if there is a logical process that brought you to the wrong conclusion.

                                      Comment


                                        There is a movement to ditch the essay, but that hasn't happened yet.

                                        The tests are not as outcome-determinative as people think. Quite a few schools no longer require them, in part because intensive coaching of affluent kids has distorted the results..

                                        There is obviously no reason for "consultants" of this ilk to educate parents on that point.

                                        Comment


                                          What age do people do them?

                                          Comment


                                            Junior and Senior year of High School, so 17 and 18 for most people.

                                            You can take them as many times as you are willing to pay for (though they are only administered once a month or so).

                                            As Reed says, the size of the racket beggars belief, even for those of us who survived it.

                                            Comment


                                              There’s also the PSAT offered earlier in high school. That’s how I and about dozen of my classmates got to be a “National Merit Scholarship Finalist.” I got $2,000 out of it and my picture in the paper. I peaked too young.

                                              In my day, when there was no essay, you could also take a few SAT II tests, one of which included an essay. A lot of competitive schools ask for an admissions essay - a whole other pile of gameable bullshit - and other writing samples. I did all that.

                                              The problem with making them part of the regular SAT is finding people who can read all those millions of essays. That’s a lot more expensive than machines that read the #2 pencil marks on the ScanTron sheet.

                                              My understanding is that because they can’t spend much time on each one, they use a rigid formula for what their looking for and it probably isn’t really what sophisticated critics would think of as good writing.

                                              It’s all way more out of control than it was in my day. The expectations for extracurricular bullshit are especially onerous, in my view.

                                              Comment


                                                The extracurricular bullshit would scare the shite out of an antisocial soul like me. When I knew college Americans slumming it in Europe twenty years back, there were a whole bunch of amiable Cal State idiots who were all about the easy charm and with rich (but not mega rich) parents, who had been volunteering their ass off in high school, but whose altruistic concerns dropped off a cliff once ensconced in frat or sorority. I'd guess almost all of em are Trumpist Christians now. Not bad people, but wearying. They wouldn't have stood a chance at getting Highers/A Levels for the equivalent Brit 3rd level colleges.

                                                Well maybe they would have anyways, cos their parents would have been rich enough to send them to U.K. prep schools. Their stupidity was just more obvious than the posh U.K. types.
                                                Last edited by Lang Spoon; 15-03-2019, 01:45.

                                                Comment


                                                  The folk I met from Brown but, unspeakable.

                                                  Comment


                                                    The Russian Mat (Swearing language) is very funny indeed. That overpriced hoody above should have said (In Cyrillic) Poshal na Hoiy. I guess the designer is slapping his or her forehead and exclaiming "Pizdjetz!" right about now ;-)

                                                    Replying to a post 2 pages ago....

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X