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  • Eggchaser
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    In a way, the IPL and the Stamford League is just a throwback to cricket's early history when teams of "England Stars" and "Lord X's Men" would tour the country playing exhibition matches against each other, local teams and scratch sides, raking in the money. Equally popular were the matches featuring Lord Autumnbottom and a professional against Lord Rich Bastard and his professional (i.e. 2 a side). Gambling and match fixing were also rife.

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  • King On The Rye
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Duncan Gardner wrote:
    The real change would be losing four-innings games played over 270, 360 or 450 overs. But if nobody in Pakistan, South Africa or West Indies wants to watch them, that may decline to a purely participant amateur game, or disappear completely. Leaving test matches for England, Australia and maybe India as a nostalgia event. Like the state opening of Parliament or something.
    I'm not sure I buy that: I could envisage England and Australia still playing the longer form of the game and it being a long way from a 'nostalgia event', albeit cricket is a game that loves to wallow in nostalgia.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Cricket History Question

    Still not sure of your logic here. If I could stay sober through 3 hours of Special Brew (and I couldn't btw) would that be good or bad.

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  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Oh yeah, I forgot the abysmal choice of drink at most cricket grounds...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Cricket History Question

    Because I can stay sober through 3 hours of fosters?

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  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Puff.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Cricket History Question

    The more serious drinkers need the 40/50 over game. You just can't get thoroughly enough drunk at a 20/20 game.

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  • Duncan Gardner
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    In England at least, the short game has always had a number of variations: for years there was the 40 over Sunday league, as well as 60 and 55 over cup knockouts. The former has revived, so it's not as if 50 has established as the standard.

    Given the above, although more of a fan of 50 than many on here, I wouldn't miss it so much. The real change would be losing four-innings games played over 270, 360 or 450 overs. But if nobody in Pakistan, South Africa or West Indies wants to watch them, that may decline to a purely participant amateur game, or disappear completely. Leaving test matches for England, Australia and maybe India as a nostalgia event. Like the state opening of Parliament or something.

    I want Ireland and Netherlands to play four-innings games in an effective test second division, but this may be a pipe dream.

    I suppose basically if misery guts Atherton is against it, I'm in favor.

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  • Tubby Isaacs
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    If there's a 50 over World Cup then there'll be a 50 over domestic competition.

    That doesn't really answer it, does it?

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    That's been suggested by a number of people on here recently, and seems to me to be almost sure to happen quite soon.

    The somewhat more contentious issue is whether there is a long term future for the 50 over version.

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  • pengedragon
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    neither would i

    on a slightly related point, why dont the counties just play 20, 50 and first class cricket. in other words ditch the pro 40, it's neither one thing nor the other

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Welcome pengedragon.

    In previous discussions of the subject, it has been noted just how unusual the "England and Wales" combination in cricket is.

    I would not be terribly surprised if 20-20 is the only form of one day cricket being played professionally in five years time.

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  • Tubby Isaacs
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    My idea that Minor Counties are sleeping giants to be aroused by 20-20 is looking a bit far fetched. According to wikipedia:

    "[Herefordshire] play matches around the county at Brockhampton, Colwall, Eastnor, Kington, and the Luctonians club at Kingsland near Leominster"

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  • pengedragon
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Rogin the Armchair Fan wrote:
    And, after Ireland's success at the last World Cup, why does there seem to be no pressure or desire for a Welsh international side? I presume at least half of the Glamorgan side (who are already first-class cricketers) would qualify for one?
    there is a 'wales' that plays at minor counties level

    as for the first class game, our international team is actually england and wales, representing, as we do, the england and wales cricket board

    i believe some people refer to them as simply england

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  • Andy C
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    A Greater London county would be superb
    A certain Gloucestershire doctor would be inclined to agree with you.

    I don't, though.

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  • Tubby Isaacs
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Yeah, that does seem silly. Does Ilford/Leyton even get one day games?

    Assuming no new first class teams, I wonder if a London team could be formed to play in 20-20, perhaps based at the wonderfully sited Artillery Ground near Moorgate? If the demand for test match tickets in London is anything to go by, then there's scope for it.

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  • E10 Rifle
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    I'm not sure a greater London county would necessarily work, and would erode the counties around them and the blurred interlinking between each part of London and its overspill county. In sporting-cultural terms there's never been that much of a contigious London identity. I don't want to tramp over to south-west London to watch my 'county' team, I just want my existing one to start playing in east London again.

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  • King On The Rye
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    'Unofficial' titles, according to the web's most reliable source (although I imagine the info has been plucked from Wisden):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champion_County

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  • Duncan Gardner
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    A Greater London county would be superb, being able to alternate between Lords & the Oval, and with a huge potential fan base
    It would be a shame to lose the 'Sex derbies. Although we could always go to Chelmsford or Hove, I suppose.

    And also, the gap between minor and first class counties is enormous...[but]how about a comeback under 20-20? They might win a few of those
    Indeed. As four innings cricket's decline becomes more marked, that gap may narrow. As I'll never tire of reminding you all, Strabane had more players in the World Cup's serious stages than India and Pakistan combined. Hey!

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  • Tubby Isaacs
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Durham's elevation (in 1992) was an anomaly really, born, I suppose of success in the Minor Counties championship and having impressive development plans. I don't mean that unkindly because they've produced some good players and have contributed plenty, after a terrible start where they couldn't attract good enough experienced players.

    But most people would agree there are too many counties,even if there is no appetite to cull. If one went bankrupt, it's unlikely it would be replaced. And also, the gap between minor and first class counties is enormous. The one time they met, in the first round of the knock out cup, the first class side usually won by about 200 runs. Not bad in a 60 over game. The minor counties aren't even in the competition now. How about a comeback under 20-20? They might win a few of those.

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  • Wyatt Earp
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    I wouldn't agree that not being champion county equals "futility". Without getting all Spirit Of The Game on your ass, that does seem a bit too Vince Lombardi for cricket.

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  • JtS
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    Middle middle middle
    Sex sex sex.

    If Middlesex had to go then Surrey would also be halved (and lose the Oval), and Kent & Essex would have large bits chopped off.

    A Greater London county would be superb, being able to alternate between Lords & the Oval, and with a huge potential fan base.

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  • The Purple Cow
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    "Also has anyone ever been booted out? I mean Middlesex isn't even a county anymore is it, so shouldn't they be gone?"

    When the Tories re-arranged the county lines in the '70's the cricket authorities agreed to disagree with the rest of the country and continue with the old county borders. So you were left with anomalies like Yorkshire only playing players who were real Yorkshiremen - suddenly having half the team from outside Yorkshire, and of course Edgbaston is no longer in Warwickshire.

    **

    There have been some rumblings about establishing a Welsh team, I read something about it on Cricinfo.

    The whole idea of cricket nationality is in a mess. Rumour here has it that the Netherlands is going to lose it's star player, the South African born Ryan ten Doeschaete, because he is going to be playing for England 'A' this summer.

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    And, after Ireland's success at the last World Cup, why does there seem to be no pressure or desire for a Welsh international side? I presume at least half of the Glamorgan side (who are already first-class cricketers) would qualify for one?

    Leave a comment:


  • Amor de Cosmos
    replied
    Cricket History Question

    How do you get elected to the County Championship? I noticed only recently that Durham had made it and it's unique in our lifetimes. Does the entire team have to go down on the Chairman of the MCC or something?

    Also has anyone ever been booted out? I mean Middlesex isn't even a county anymore is it, so shouldn't they be gone?

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