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  • Various Artist
    replied
    For what it's worth, Tochinoshin never got his right hand down before that bout started, either. Hell of a fight, though.
    Originally posted by Anton Gramscescu View Post
    Two other big-name fights today: Tochinoshin handed Kakuryu his first loss. This was amazing stuff. Tochinoshin had been getting beat all tournament by opponents getting underneath him and preventing him from getting an inside grip. kakuryu did that today but Tochinoshin just reached over him and lifted him up from over the top of his (K's) shoulder, atomic-wedgie style. Unbelievable strength and skill required. (starts at 13:15 here)
    Holy shit, did you hear the impact when they collided?! That woke the crowd up and then some. That incredible "atomic wedgie" manoeuvre by Tochinoshin is a carbon copy of what he did to Shohozan in July, as you yourself flagged up:
    Originally posted by Anton Gramscescu View Post
    Highlight of day 3 is the absolutely ludicrous Chyonokuni - Takayasu match (11:15). Takayasu battles back twice, throws 'kuni who *somehow* manages not to touch the ground, recovers, and then grapples Takayasu into a mutual overarm throw - both hit the deck but Takayasu's knee was marginally faster, so 'kuni gets the win. Shohozan's flailing legs as Tochinoshin crane-lifts him out of the ring is good for a laugh as well.
    As I said above, I'd just watched that video last night, so the move was immediately familiar when I saw it again just now. I can't work out if he has extremely long arms, or if it's just an optical illusion due to his different physiognomy compared to the Japanese/Mongolian rikishi, or because when he's reaching over an opponent's shoulders to lift them by the back of their belt it's such an implausible-looking hold to be able to grab.
    Last edited by Various Artist; 19-09-2018, 15:54.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Nope. not supposed to start until both men have both hands on the ground.

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    Here's the Hakuho match - to my eye Takayasu has one hand down; is that acceptable?

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Well, Kisenosato lost today to Ichinojo, and his remaining four matches are, i believe, all against Ozeki or Yokozunas, so it;s possible he ends up at 8-7 which might still spell retirement. Ichinojo for once came out all guns firing and it was devastating.

    Two other big-name fights today: Tochinoshin handed Kakuryu his first loss. This was amazing stuff. Tochinoshin had been getting beat all tournament by opponents getting underneath him and preventing him from getting an inside grip. kakuryu did that today but Tochinoshin just reached over him and lifted him up from over the top of his (K's) shoulder, atomic-wedgie style. Ubelievable strength and skill required. (starts at 13:15 here)

    The last fight was Hakuho - Takayasu. I'm pretty sure Hakuho should have been called for a matta (false start) - pretty sure T's hands weren't actually set before H bulldozed him (same clip above, starts at 16:00). Still, he's now alone at 11-0. In very good shape approaching the last weekend

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  • Various Artist
    replied
    Originally posted by Anton Gramscescu View Post
    Amazingly, Kisenosato hit his kachikoshi today. 8-2. He can now go kyujo for another year if he likes.
    Jesus wept, I hope he doesn't.

    Bizarre how Tochinoshin has slipped so rapidly from the heights he was scaling a couple of months back. He looked unbeatable in May until he got, erm, beaten, and again looked great in July until he got injured.

    I've just caught up with what happened in July and watched that incredible Takayasu v Chiyonokuni bout, won by Chiyonokuni by the narrowest margin after taking them both out of the ring simultaneously with an overarm throw, shortly after his remarkable 'splits' defence kept him in it. Amazing match.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    OK, things are getting a bit insane. Will try to post video a bit later, but key points:

    Hakuho 10-0, Kakuryu 10-0. This is proper sumo - these two will hopefully take it down to the final day.
    The two 8-1 Ozeki squared off today. Takayasu beat Goeido: he is now the lone rikishi at 9-1
    Amazingly, Kisenosato hit his kachikoshi today. 8-2. He can now go kyujo for another year if he likes.
    Mitakaeumi and Tochinoshin are both 6-4. The former now needs to run the table to make Ozeki this tournament. The latter, to keep status, need two wins from matches against Hakuho, Kakuryu, Takayasu, and two megashira TBD (most likely Endo and Shodai). Still tight.

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  • Various Artist
    replied
    Thanks as ever AG for the updates here, really looking forward to seeing your verdict on the subsequent days!

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day 8. Down to just Hakuho and Karkuryu in the undefeated ranks. Tochinoshin was handed his third loss (to Goeido) and he is yet to fight the three yokozuna - demotion now looking at least possible.

    Sorry not to be posting video, have been travelling.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day 7 now and this is a proper sumo tournament. Nobody of note kyujo, the top dogs all (mostly) winning, and the top Megas getting the shit properly kicked out of them every single day. And we're now almost to the second half of the tournament where the top dogs have to face each other every day. Really looking forward to this week.

    At 7-0, we ave Hakuho, Kakuryu, Takayasu and - form the lower ranks - Hokutofuji. It;s just about possible you could see Hokutofuji sneak in this time because the way the schedule is going to shake out there isn't really room to bring a lower-ranked guy into the schedule of the top dogs in the final days. Could be interesting.

    At 6-1 - Goeido, Mitakaeumi, Kisenosato (who has not been brilliant by any means, but he has been entertaining, very good to see him back)

    At 5-2 - Tochinoshin, Abi, Yoshikaze, Takanoiwa, Asanoyama

    This last week is going to be lit, as the kids say. BTW - I have found a good livestream for the Makuuchi bouts at least if youwant to get a flavour of what the whole ritual looks like (as opposed to just check out the hilights). The NHK-Globlal stream is here (in Japanese) - https://aqstream.com/jp/nhk/NHK-G. The san'yaku bouts run from about 9-10AM UK time.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day 1 is here. All the usual suspects - including Kisenosato - won except Goeido who looked terrible. Also, Takanoiwa won his first bout back in Makuuchi since being cracked over the head with a TV remote. Ishiura's henkas are getting really annoying.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Mitakaeumi won back in July, if that was bothering anyone.

    But now it is September, time for Aki basho. Big Story: no one is kyujo! All 70 rikishi from the top divisions are going to start in a few hours including Kisenosato. sub-plots, such as they are:

    Kisenosato needs to get kachi-koshi (8 wins) to avoid enforced retirement.
    Tochinoshin needs kachi-koshi retain Ozeki status
    Mitakaeumi needs 10 or 11 wins for promotion to Ozeki.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day 11 just ended: Mitakaeumi is 11-0, Asanoyama and Tochiozan are 9-2. Mitakaeumi still has to fight the Mongolian Obelix (ichinojo) and two banged up Ozeki, and Lord knows he is prone to sudden cold streaks, but this basho is starting to look done. Also: Yoshikaze 0-11
    Last edited by Anton Gramscescu; 18-07-2018, 09:22.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Hilight of Day 9 was probably this bout between Goeido and Kagayaki. Yes, a fit Goeido would have put his opponent away in the first two seconds (in that supremely efficient way Mitakaeumi has been doing for the last week). But this...this is a great back-and-forth match.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Sorry for lack of updates, have been on flights much of the last two days, and am also seriously bummed out by Tochinoshin's departure. The skinny on days 8 and 9, both now in the books: Mitakaeumi is now 9-0...not only is he starting to look a decent bet to win the tournament, the Ozeki buzz is going to start the instant he hits 11. But of course he is a notoriously streaky rikishi so far too early to start talking about this just yet. M13 Asanoyama is 8-1 (expect the schedulers to get busy giving him real opponents soon), M6 Endo and and O Takayasu are 7-2. Ichinojo at 3-6 looks terrible and soft and now very unlikely to stay in the San'yaku.

    Under-reported story of the tournament: Yoshikaze is 0-9. His sumo has entirely disappeared and at this rate may fall out of the top division altogether (which is really hard to do from an M5 rank but he seems to be giving it a go).

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Two pieces of good news, I guess. 1 - there will almost certainly be a first-time yusho winner now. 2 - Takanoiwa is back, baby! Great fight today to retain the juryo lead.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Yeah, well, pressure and a busted toe apparently. Tochinoshin kyujo with what is being reported as "Damage to the collateral ligament of the MTP joint of the great toe.". Mitakaeumi is 7-0, Endo, Chiotariyu and Asanoyama at 6-1. Goeido is 4-3 and is thanking his lucky stars that sumo gods have taken out his three toughest opponents or he'd be looking at a pretty certain demotion.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Pressure may have got to Tochinoshin. He looked off at ringside, and then matta'ed (false started) before being beat by Tamawashi. Mitakaeumi alone at the top at 6-0. Endo, Chiotaiyu, Tochinoshin and a couple of low-tier dudes at 5-1.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Aaaaand Kakuryuu is kyujo to start day 6. First basho in nineteen years without a Yokozuna. This leaves Tochinoshin as pretty much the clear favourite to win, I think - and significantly improves Goeido's chances of staying an Ozeki since now his two matches with Yokozuna will be replaced with two matches with M5s, making the 8-win threshold one helluva lot easier to cross. The immediate beneficiary is *again* Chyonokuni, who wins for a second time by fusen and is now 4-2.

    Also, down in juryo, Takanoiwa (Mr. getting-hit-over-the-head-with-a-tv-remote-by-Harumafuji) is joint leader at 5-1. If he can keeps this form he'll be back in the top division come September.
    Last edited by Anton Gramscescu; 13-07-2018, 08:38.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day 4 video is here for those interested.

    Day 5 is in the books. Tochinoshin and Mitakaeumi stay unbeaten and the Georgian really is looking unbeatable - this may be the basho where people have to start seriously contemplating a European Yokozuna. Kakuryuu gets beaten for the second day in a row, this time by the flailing Abi (13:50). The trick with Kakuryuu really is the same as with Tochinoshin: don't get into belt battle, he'll kill you (though usually by throwing rather than lifting). Takayasu is at 4-1 after another dodgy-looking win (12:40) against Ikioi - dodgy in the sense that his technique is all over the place and I think he's going to have trouble as week 2 progresses and he has to fight tougher opposition. A bunch of other dudes are also on 4-1, notably Kaisei and Endo.

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  • Wouter D
    replied
    Originally posted by Anton Gramscescu View Post
    Highlight of day 3 is the absolutely ludicrous Chyonokuni - Takayasu match (11:15). Takayasu battles back twice, throws 'kuni who *somehow* manages not to touch the ground, recovers, and then grapples Takayasu into a mutual overarm throw - both hit the deck but Takayasu's knee was marginally faster, so 'kuni gets the win. Shohozan's flailing legs as Tochinoshin crane-lifts him out of the ring is good for a laugh as well (13:10).
    That was fantastic.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day three here. The odd trend so far is all the small guys jumping around so that they can get behind the bigger guys and bush them out from the back. Watch Ishiura on day 3. Watch Abi on day 2. This is a bit odd. Highlight of day 3 is the absolutely ludicrous Chyonokuni - Takayasu match (11:15). Takayasu battles back twice, throws 'kuni who *somehow* manages not to touch the ground, recovers, and then grapples Takayasu into a mutual overarm throw - both hit the deck but Takayasu's knee was marginally faster, so 'kuni gets the win. Shohozan's flailing legs as Tochinoshin crane-lifts him out of the ring is good for a laugh as well (13:10).

    As for day 4 - video not yet available, but Hakuho is kyujo with a knee ligament strain, so Chiyonkuni picks up a lucky third win and he now looks a much better bet for kachi-koshi than he did at the start. Kakuryuu also lost, which leaves Tochinoshin and Mitakaeumi as the only two undefeated rikishi at 4-0.
    Last edited by Anton Gramscescu; 11-07-2018, 11:13.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Day two here. The seven top-ranked rikishi all posted wins. Very little of special note. Abi almost got one over on Ichinojo (8:50). And the Hakuho match at the end is kind of amusing because a ref finally called him on one of his bullshit moves (not actually putting his fists down before the tachiai). I love him to death and he is the greatest ever but he really is shameless in the way he flaunts rules/conventions and gets away with it.
    .

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    Today's matches are here. Tochinoshin and Ichinojo have new mawashis. Hakuho looked a little sloppy but won. Goeido looked terrible and lost to Shodai. Ichinojo was incomprehensibly bad (as he often is) in his loss to Chiyonokuni. Abi lost to Mitakaeumi in the battle of two dudes with ridiculously long arms. And - Onosho is back (minus the red mawashi)! He looked really good and I expect he is heading back to the San'yaku pretty soon. Match of the day, I think, was Takayasu - Kotoshogiku (at 10:40, the labelling on the bout is wrong, don't be confused). Good start all around.

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  • Anton Gramscescu
    replied
    BUMP.

    Nagoya basho time. Guess who's kyujo? Yes, it;s Kisenosato, who will set an all-time record of missing or withdrawing from 8 consecutive bashos (previous record was Takanohana, with 7). But you know what? No one cares! He can be kyujo until the Olympics and they'll keep him because goddamn it he's Japanese and the country needs a hero!

    No other significant news of note, other than that Goiedo and Takayasu are both kadoban and face loss of Ozeki status if they have losing records. The top of the table is exactly the way I had it above. M2 ended up being Ikioi and Chyonukuni (who will be *murdered* at that rank, I think). M3 is Abi and Takakeisho (suspect both will have winning records at the end of it, though week 1 as always is going to be tough since they;re going to get paired up against the top dogs).

    Schedulers have given everyone a treat with Day One though: Kakuryuu v Shohozan, Tamawashi v Hakuho, Shodai v. Goeido, Kotoshogiku v. Takayasu, Ikioi v. Tochinoshin, and Abi v. Mitakeumi. It's going to be a great day.

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  • Various Artist
    replied
    I must second superstu's comment there, many thanks indeed AG for the super updates and for whetting our appetites for the resumption of hostilities next time around! A real shame Tochinoshin couldn't get the yūshō here, after such a superb initial run, but his performance has certainly made things look more interesting for the coming basho.

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