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  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    He cannot even be vice captain in that case.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Doesn’t Smith have a period banned from any “position of authority” even after his ban from playing is over?

    Even if not, surely he’ll come back in to the side as a player only rather than captain?

    Edit : just checked and it’s a further year :

    "Steve Smith and Cameron Bancroft will not be considered for team leadership positions until a minimum of 12 months after the conclusion of their respective suspensions from international and domestic cricket. Any consideration of future leadership would be conditional on acceptance by fans and the public, form and authority among the playing group. David Warner will not be considered for team leadership positions in the future," CA said in a statement.
    Last edited by Ray de Galles; 28-12-2018, 13:40.

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  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    Originally posted by diggedy derek View Post
    If Australia lose this series, surely Steven Smith is a shoe-in to return as captain.
    It would be be soon but in any case I don't think he was a particularly good captain and Paine has done OK with an impossibly weak batting line-up.

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    Another factor against the follow on today I believe is that there's a heatwave going on. Wasn't it about 40°today? That seems as good a reason as any to not want to be out on the field all day

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  • G-Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Rogin the Armchair fan View Post
    Has there ever been a player out on the pitch for an entire test match? I mean an opening batsman not out (or last out) in both innings and fielding through two complete innings for the opponents?
    No opener has carried his bat twice in a test (that is, surviving the loss of ten batting partners twice in a test). The number of players who have carried their bat more than once in their test career is very short. Only two, Dean Elgar and Desmond Haynes, have done that three times.

    Kraigg Brathwaite was twice not out (142* and 60*) for the West Indies in their win against against Pakistan in 2016.

    Other than that, a couple of players carried their bat in their sides only innings in drawn matches: Tom Latham a couple of weeks ago for NZ against Sri Lanka, and Alistair Cook a year ago against Australia.

    Leave a comment:


  • diggedy derek
    replied
    If Australia lose this series, surely Steven Smith is a shoe-in to return as captain.

    Leave a comment:


  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    I would only ever enforce the follow on if the opposition was out for below 100, more than 400 behind or time were an issue.

    Although the wicket is doing a lot, four of Bumrah's wickets were pitched up so the pitch was not the issue in all cases.

    Australia cannot bat under pressure. Inexperience, poor technique (T20?), just a poor batting side.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    Another reason follow-ons are not enforced is that teams so rarely manage to bat out a draw. Give them 350 to chase in four sessions and they'll usually crumble.

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan
    replied
    Has there ever been a player out on the pitch for an entire test match? I mean an opening batsman not out (or last out) in both innings and fielding through two complete innings for the opponents?

    Leave a comment:


  • Etienne
    replied
    I think that argument is balls. The team batting first has enough of an advantage without giving them a further one - even if it wouldn't be used very often.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    http://www.espncricinfo.com/blogs/co...ry/797859.html

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  • Etienne
    replied
    No-one enforces the follow-on anymore, unless it's really exceptional circumstances. Tires out the bowlers, and might lead to an awkward chase on a worn pitch. Easier to bat third, grind the opposition down and give them the worn pitch for their fourth innings, especially when there's loads of time left.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    The non-enforcing of the follow-on has been an increasing trend over the past, dunno, 20 years of test cricket? I suppose part of the thinking behind it is that your bowlers are tired and wouldn't have the same impact in the second innings as in the first. Against this in general, pitches deteriorate and bowling therefore becomes more profitable and in this particular match, it wasn't as if India's bowlers were out in the sun for too long. Then there are arguments about the weather and how best to stop the threat of rain ruining a winning position. I sure websites such as cricinfo have any number of interesting and stats-filled articles on this subject but that's my very brief amateur answer for starters.

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  • Antepli Ejderha
    replied
    Why didn't India enforce the follow on?

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    After 2 wickets fell on the first day, 5 on the second (possibly inflated by a pre declaration acceleration), 15 have fallen today. And there are still 2 overs left

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  • Etienne
    replied
    The game is surely lost, but that's some spell by Pat Cummins. (Edit : it seems that India just kept getting out to average balls rather than it being an unplayable spell).
    Last edited by Etienne; 28-12-2018, 05:55.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Could be worse.

    Sri Lanka are 4 for 1 “chasing” 680

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  • Sits
    replied
    Seven down and still just over 300 behind. I have to keep trying reminding myself Australia is my second team.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    Jadeja gets Khawaja. Marsh Sr has two off 24, and with those kind of strike rates there’s a serious risk Australia get themselves out.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    India have Australia two down with lunch still a ways away. They’ve got a shot at a big lead, and the attack to do it.

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  • tee rex
    replied
    Trent Boult, ball by ball: W...WW.W...W

    Four lbw ducks for nos. 7-11. Fred Goodall would be proud!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    That's true...we've been spoiled by modern-day run rates.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Sounds like it was that sort of pitch. Twenty years ago no-one would have thought their run rate especially slow.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Yes, but why bat so slowly before?

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    The declaration, however, does show intent

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