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Ex-Beatles' Xmas hits time confusion

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    #26
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    And since. No idea of the numbers but I'd imagine Mariah's festive effort probably garners more downloads nowadays.
    But Mariah's record is clearly a Phil Spector throwback, with nothing really 90s to the arrangement, whereas Slade is definitely 1973 (although Wizzard are also clearly Spector-influenced).

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      #27
      Originally posted by Nurse Duckett View Post
      About the same number of televised football matches where they wait until the game is finished before asking the co-commentator to nominate the man of the match?

      Lucky that nothing ever happens after the 88th minute - ask any Leeds or Norwich fans (other examples are available)...
      Don Fox won the man of the match award in the Challenge Cup final in 1968. Anyone remotely interested in RL on here will appreciate the irony of this.

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        #28
        Originally posted by ad hoc View Post
        I'm intrigued at this time of the year as to how few bands/artists have tried to cash in on what must be a market for "Happy New Year" records. The amount of money that Slade, or Shane Macgowan, or whoever must have made over the years by dint of having their songs on repeat for a month every single year must surely have convinced people that making a record for New Year would be an earner. Abba did it (and get endless airtime through it, at least over here), and arguably U2 did too, but almost no others that i can think of. And of course there are large swathes of the world where Christmas is not celebrated but New Year is.
        Dan Fogelberg had his "Same Auld Lang Syne" song, though NewYear's Eve was more a McGuffin than story line.

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          #29
          Originally posted by Satchmo Distel View Post
          A bigger issue perhaps is that Lennon nicked the melody from this

          https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hXdQB-mR4tg
          This came up on another thread and although obviously the melodies are similar the original doesn't have the chorus of the Lennon/Ono song.

          As well as this, doesn't practically every tune ever written sound like another one? Evidence to the contrary gratefully received.

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            #30
            If it did, then nobody would care to mention that a song sounds like another song.

            Here are 24 songs which sounnd rather too much like other songs.

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              #31
              Leona Lewis "One More Sleep" is higher in the chart this week (top twenty) than Shakin, Wizzard or Chris Rea. Given it's five years old already, I'd say that counts as established, outside us middle aged grumpy folk.

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                #32
                Originally posted by G-Man View Post
                If it did, then nobody would care to mention that a song sounds like another song.

                Here are 24 songs which sounnd rather too much like other songs.
                Interesting list, that - observation of the Nosmo King/Maxine Nightingale conflagration saw Record Mirror publish my letter to said effect in 1976. (IIRC, I also mentioned similarities between the then-current Stylistics hit 16 Bars and Marie Osmond's Paper Roses from a few years before.)
                Last edited by Jah Womble; 28-12-2018, 22:40.

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                  #33
                  Originally posted by Sits View Post
                  My primary school made a record in about 1973, I've not seen a penny.

                  It was shite, mind.
                  My middle school made an album, in...19...7...9?

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                    #34
                    Originally posted by TonTon View Post
                    My middle school made an album, in...19...7...9?
                    The Wall?

                    That's guessing at albums with kids on. If your school was The B-52's it'd be much cooler.

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                      #35
                      Back to the OP... "War is over... if you want it..."

                      Oh really, John. If we just fucking want it, eh? That's all it's going to fucking take.

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                        #36
                        Implicit in that, surely, is the idea to topple warmongering power structures. Whether that idea is realistic even if the greatest will is exerted, that's a separate discussion.

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                          #37
                          Exactly. It's a pop song, therefore is going to be hard-pushed to dissect specific methods by which one might go about dismantling dictatorships within its three minutes.

                          Least of all while Yoko's warbling away in the background.

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                            #38
                            Originally posted by Rogin the Armchair fan View Post
                            The New Year really begins on December 21st. So it's not inconsistent at all to get to that date, sigh 'another year over' and then 'and so this is Christmas'.
                            That's a new theory. So you go around wishing people Happy New Year on December 21st? It's bad enough people doing it on December 31st through the first two weeks of January, so why would anyone want to start 10 days earlier unless you really wanted everyone to hate you?

                            And this leads me on to Jah's musing on the lack of New Year songs - I think it's because of exactly that. Xmas songs start getting air play from mid-November through to the end of December. New Year's has a much shorter time span - maybe a week at most before everyone's sick to fucking death of the phrase, while already being sick to fucking death of the holidays, their family, drinking, everything being shut etc. From Jan. 1st on you're focused on your new gym membership, changing job, converting the attic, scaling Everest etc. Plus, the Xmas vocabulary is much wider - you've got Xmas, Yuletide, Santa, jingling bells, festive trees, lust-provoking mistletoe, inhibition-loosening mulled wine, lights and decorations and a whole lot more. With New Year you've got 'Happy New Year', and Abba pretty much wrapped up the market for good. Except for Lennon with his egregiously mendacious melody.

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                              #39
                              Poor Lennon is copping it here, isn't he? Any more songs we can tear to pieces while we're at it (there must be thousands...)?

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                                #40
                                I heard the Altered Images Number 2 smash re-recoreded with Clare Grogan warbling Happy Christmas then switching to Happy New Year for the last few lines on Absolute 80s the other day for the first time ever. I've no idea when they updated it but they have got the entire holiday season covered.

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                                  #41
                                  Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
                                  Exactly. It's a pop song, therefore is going to be hard-pushed to dissect specific methods by which one might go about dismantling dictatorships within its three minutes..
                                  Well sure. But it still irks me. Its not a simple solution - Lennon wasn't a dip, so he knew that - but that line makes it sound simple. Like if we really, really want it, we can stop wars.

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                                    #42
                                    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
                                    Well sure. But it still irks me. Its not a simple solution - Lennon wasn't a dip, so he knew that - but that line makes it sound simple. Like if we really, really want it, we can stop wars.
                                    Indeed, but fortunately the pop industry redeemed itself when Boy George came along with a far more sophisticated and probing analysis of military conflict.

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                                      #43
                                      Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
                                      Well sure. But it still irks me. Its not a simple solution - Lennon wasn't a dip, so he knew that - but that line makes it sound simple. Like if we really, really want it, we can stop wars.
                                      Right, so we need an alternative solution to stop wars. Wishing them away is not a realistic plan. So we need some kind of revolution. We all want to change the world. But to succeed in such a revolution, we must really, really want it. And this has implications. Lennon stops short of suggesting what these sacrifices entail (and doesn't really suggest a plan as to the dynamics of the revolution). But he offers an ideological roadmap -- no possession, no religion, no borders etc. The trouble, of course is, he personally didn't really, really want it.

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                                        #44
                                        Originally posted by imp View Post
                                        Indeed, but fortunately the pop industry redeemed itself when Boy George came along with a far more sophisticated and probing analysis of military conflict.
                                        <Applause>

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