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Stupid musical genres made up by desperate journalists.

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    #51
    Pub rock?

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      #52
      "Power Pop" - I thought it was a strange off shoot around the time of The Jam, just before Modern World- All I can remember is some Beatles wannebee group called, I think, The Pleasers, who called themselves Power Poppers as opposed to Mod revivalists, and of course Power Pop is mentioned at the start of "News of the World".

      NB I thought I would look up Power Pop in Wiki - and it seems it wasn't made up by any journos but by Townshend in '67 - and was supposed to be " a more agressive form of pop, rather than calling it light rock. It's most successful thing being "My Sharona" - lawks!
      So the fact the only time I heard of the term, showed I wasn't paying attention.

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        #53
        Yes, I remember The Pleasers - they always seemed to appear on kids' pop shows like Get It Together - and also Tonight, who at least managed a Top 20 hit with Drummer Man (1978).

        Early bands like The Raspberries in the US and Badfinger over here have latterly been dubbed as Power Pop, but, just looking at that Wiki article, it doesn't sound as though many people had much idea of what it represented - or if they did, it was woolly beyond identification. I mean, I barely see any common ground between Cheap Trick and The Jam - and Nick Lowe/Dave Edmunds surely had their roots in R&B and pub rock, as did some of these others lumped in with it.

        That said, I can see something in The Knack perhaps falling under this banner, and maybe other jacket/skinny-tie bands (The Cars, The Records, etc).

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          #54
          "Post-punk" is a bit of an overstretch, in my opinion; in Simon Reynolds' book, for example, all kinds of disparate acts are lumped together. It's more of an attitude than a style, and like all musical "stances" it eventually contradicted itself.

          Power pop is just slightly louder, guitar-based pop that could have been made in some earlier eras (not that different from The Kinks or Revolver-era Beatles, say).
          Last edited by Satchmo Distel; 04-12-2018, 19:40.

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            #55
            Americana is a bit of muddled genre, and disliked by a lit of artists who get lumped in there.

            But 'Cosmic Americana'? Hmm...

            https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...a-gram-parsons

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              #56
              I was reading an article about Keira Knightley in the Guardian the other day (I would claim I've got too much time on my hands, but I don't even have that excuse at the moment) and it reminded me of the erstwhile existence of musical non-genre "new rave". Prime contender for this thread, I would have thought.

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                #57
                Originally posted by Prester John View Post
                Americana is a bit of muddled genre, and disliked by a lit of artists who get lumped in there.

                But 'Cosmic Americana'? Hmm...

                https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...a-gram-parsons
                There’s actually an Americana Music Association that gives out awards and tries to promote Americana music, broadly defined, worldwide.

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                  #58
                  Man, I was just about to say that I had never heard the term applied to music.

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                    #59
                    The Dunedin sound? Or is this a bona fide genre that spawned many imitators?

                    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunedin_sound

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                      #60
                      I used to hear the term "math rock" bandied about but never knew what it was like.

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                        #61
                        Think of it as the stepping stone between prog and emo.

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                          #62
                          I gather it's applied to US acts like Slint or Shellac (who, to me at least, will always be post-hardcore), but in the UK, 'maths rock' was occasionally used to describe more austere bands like Stereolab and Broadcast. Always thought it an absolute cobblers expression, personally.

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                            #63
                            https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...ut-mathematics

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                              #64
                              I can think of Shellac, Refused, Quicksand, Helmet, Prong and Nomeansno with their different time signatures and tempos within songs might be seen as precursors to "math rock. To me, "math rock" is System Of A Down who I once heckled - quite archly, I thought - shouting "Write a fucking chorus" at them at Donington which, possibly gives you an idea of what they are like.
                              Last edited by Bordeaux Education; 10-01-2019, 20:34.

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                                #65
                                I thought that Foals were the big name in 'maths rock' but it seemed like such a blatantly awful concept that I never looked into it in any detail.

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