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  • Jawohl Womble
    replied
    Originally posted by Drei Farben Rot View Post

    Not helped at all by his facial prosthetics visibly starting to fall off by the end of the video.
    I felt that that added to the overall entertainment, but yes.​

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  • Drei Farben Rot
    replied
    Originally posted by Discordant Resonance View Post
    promptly vanishing off the metaphorical cliff from 1985 onwards.
    That happened to almost every "synth-and-production" leaning pop act after Live Aid, it seemed. Either adapt to more of a stadium rock sound or wither on the vine.
    Last edited by Drei Farben Rot; Yesterday, 11:41.

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  • Greenlander
    replied
    That's about as good a top ten as it gets for me, and though I'm stuggling to recall either the Spandau or the Evelyn Thomas tunes, there's nothing particularly duff there at all.

    Ultravox or Bronski Beat for the win, with Wham and the Smiths running them close.

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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied
    FGTH's career trajectory was very odd in retrospect - burst onto the scene, and immediately became the number one band in Britain throughout 1984, before promptly vanishing off the metaphorical cliff from 1985 onwards. Granted, Holly Johnson has featured on this thread for his solo work, but all in all, extremely strange.

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  • Drei Farben Rot
    replied
    Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
    (not very) lookalikes of Reagan
    Not helped at all by his facial prosthetics visibly starting to fall off by the end of the video.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    The FGTH vid is of course the one with the (not very) lookalikes of Reagan and Chernenko scrapping it out in a giant sandpit.

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  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    I have no memory of the Evelyn Thomas tune from the title. Marr's guitar is great on The Smiths' tune but it's the start of Morrissey's whiny self-parody tropes that make me want to slap him in hindsight. Bronskis still packs a punch and it's a beautiful melody and falsetto so I'll take that. Is the Frankie video the one with the todger?

    No obvious weak track stinking out the 10.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    That’s a healthily gay Top Ten. Fond memories of a properly hot summer at art school.

    Not sure for whom I’d plump here, perhaps FGTH (their number-one debut was genuinely exciting), Bronski Beat or maybe The Smiths - but even Spandau Ballet and, yes, Howard J were charting with (IMO) their strongest-ever efforts. Evelyn Thomas’s tune was a banger at parties, too.

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  • Discordant Resonance
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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied
    Forty years ago today, Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now remains unchanged at 10 for The Smiths, while Deniece Williams' Let's Hear It For The Boy tumbles seven to 9. Elton John's Sad Songs (Say So Much) climb four to 8, and Howard Jones' Pearl In The Shell inches up one to 7. Ultravox's Dancing With Tears In My Eyes drops three to 6, and Evelyn Thomas' High Energy rises four to 5. Bronski Beat's Smalltown Boy soars nine to 4, and Spandau Ballet's Only When You Leave ascends two to 3. Wham's Wake Me Up Before You Go Go falls from the top to 2, and it's time to go to war, as Frankie Goes To Hollywood's Two Tribes is new at 1.

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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied




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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied
    In 1957, we see the first of three versions of the same song, as Gracie Fields' Around The World falls two to joint 10th, with Peggy Lee's Mr Wonderful tumbling five to the same mark, while the Charles McDevitt Skiffle Group and Nancy Whiskey's Freight Train plummets three to 9. Diamonds' Little Darlin' soars six to 8, while Lonnie Donegan's Gamblin' Man/Putting On The Style jumps four to 7. The other two versions of Around The World are at 6 and 5, with Bing Crosby rising three, and Ronnie Hilton climbing two, respectively. Guy Mitchell's Rock-A-Billy slips the minimum to 4, as does Andy Williams' Butterfly to 3. Nat King Cole's When I Fall In Love inches up one to 2, but Johnnie Ray's Yes Tonight Josephine remains at 1.

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  • longeared
    replied
    I recognise a surprising amount of that chart given the era, although there is a lot of radio friendly material in there.

    Duffy emerged at pretty much the same time as Adele and there seemed to be an expectation that she would be the bigger act - she was being mentored by Bernard Butler and Mercy managed the rare feat of being playlisted by all of Radios 1, 2 and 6. The narrative for a long time was that she blew her career by sacking pretty much everybody she worked with and then her second album bombed spectacularly as a result, but we know now of the horrible stuff and don't know where it all fits into a timeline.

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Duffy was decent for a mass-market act of that era, and of course her life took some unexpected and traumatic turns after that short spell of success.

    That's Not My Name is an absolute anthem in this house, daughter was five when came out and, because I burdened her with a name that's rare but similar to several other names, I'd sing it to her listing all of the names that people used to call her by mistake, and she'd shout THAT'S NOT MY NAME. We didn't have Sky TV, we had to make our own entertainment.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    I'd place it as 'tinged water' rather than consommé, which at least has flavour.

    I felt that Mercy was a decent-enough pastiche of sixties (Northern) soul, so am effectively giving the bouquet to Duffy on that score.

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  • Sean of the Shed
    replied
    Ting Tings are definitely irritating, as is Duffy, her voice is proper nails down a blackboard. I'd probably pick Sweet About Me as the best in this chart, but this gruel is so thin it's practically a consommé.

    Will i am and Cheryl Cole... *shudders*

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    The only songs I've even (knowingly) heard in this chart are The Ting Tings and Duffy.

    I always found That's Not My Name irritating so I'll give it to the Welsh songstress. (Mercy was better, however.)​

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  • Simon G
    replied
    Sweet About Me is a decent little ditty. The Ting Tings win out for me though.

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  • Benjm
    replied
    Sam Sparro and The Ting Tings are the only ones I can hum without checking. I saw The Ting Tings support the Pet Shop Boys once and they were entertaining so the day is theirs.

    I supposed to be packing, so fighting the urge to waste time unnecessarily expanding on the above at great length leading to stress and panic as the time to set off draws closer.

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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied




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  • Discordant Resonance
    replied
    In 2008, Will I Am and Cheryl Cole's Heartbreaker tumbles five to 10, while Sam Sparro's (sic) Black and Gold drops three to 9. Madonna (and a seemingly uncredited Justin Timberlake)'s 4 Minutes appropriately falls four to 8, and Gabriella Cilmi's Sweet About Me climbs seven to 7. Sara Bareilles' Love Song soars nine to 6, while Ne-Yo's Closer moves up two to 5. Duffy's Warwick Avenue and The Ting-Tings' That's Not My Name both slip the minimum to 4 and 3 respectively. Rihanna's Take A Bow does likewise to 2, but Mint Royale's Singin' In The Rain rises a whopping twenty-seven places to 1.

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  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    That's an idea I'm nicking for another thread.

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  • Benjm
    replied
    Originally posted by slackster View Post
    Imagine what sort of upbeat film Midnight Cowboy could have been if they’d used this ditty rather than John Barry’s more melancholic harmonica theme tune…
    Likewise, Last Of The Summer Wine! A funkier oldsploitation vibe would have made it far less purgatorial.

    Some sources credit the harmonica part on the actual recording to Harry Pitch which Pitch later confirmed in his filmed interview with RockHistory.co.uk - Pitch then went on as the harmonica player to perform the theme tune for Last of the Summer Wine.

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  • slackster
    replied
    That Mr Bloe one-hit wonder gets me in the mood for groovin’ too.

    There’s an interesting backstory about the outfit & tune on wiki, including Elton John’s involvement. Imagine what sort of upbeat film Midnight Cowboy could have been if they’d used this ditty rather than John Barry’s more melancholic harmonica theme tune…

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Satchmo Distel View Post
    "Have a drink, have a drive" hasn't lasted well.
    Indeed, it was later used in an anti drink driving awareness TV campaign.

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