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    8 - 6 form a pleasing trio.

    I couldn't remember Dear John at all and on listening was impressed by its use of field recordings and traditional Japanese taiko drumming to create an atmospheric soundscape comparable to similarly open minded explorations by Eno & Byrne and Holger Czukay around this time.

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      The Quo had recently parted company with John Coghlan, so I always felt that that hit was a nod to this situation. They were morphing into a cabaret turn by then, however.

      Some good tunes among that very varied selection: Pigbag's theme tune was always an enjoyable college-party moment, My Camera Never Lies certainly BF's best moment, and Chas & Dave's hit was much better than I thought it at the time.

      Japan's Ghosts remains, of course, one of the great singles of the era.

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        Likewise, apart from the Quo I can hum all of that chart, well except maybe Ghosts which doesn't really lend itself to the sing along and is all the better for it.

        Pigbag evoke mixed memories as it was the speed skating soundtrack at the Rollerena for all the cool kids, otherwise known as the point I took my uncoordinated, gangly self off the rink and went to play Defender in the arcade. I wasn't much good at that either truth be told.

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          In 1969, Noel Harrison's The Windmills Of Your Mind climbs five to 10, and Joe South's Games People Play tumbles two to 9. The Foundations' In The Bad Bad Old Days remains at 8, and The Hollies' Sorry Suzanne drops two to 7. The Who's Pinball Wizard jumps three to 6, while Dean Martin's Gentle On My Mind slips the minimum to 5. Lulu's Boom Bang-A-Bang rises two to 4, and Marvin Gaye's I Heard It Through The Grapevine falls from the top to 3. Mary Hopkin's Goodbye soars four to 2, while Desmond Dekker and the Aces' The Israelites ascends two to 1.

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              Desmond Dekker just edges Marvin in a decent chart overall

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                Yep, Dekker for me as well. Still sounds great, fifty-five years on.

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                  Absolutely Dekker. That song has the greatest harmonies ever put to vinyl. I always sing along to them until I get hoarse.

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                    Marvin just edges it for me in the battle of the big two.

                    Dean Martin doesn't seem as natural a fit to Gentle On My Mind as Glen Campbell or Bobbie Gentry.

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                      In 1996, Gabrielle's Give Me A Little More Time tumbles three to 10, while Suggs with Louchie Lou/Michie One's Cecelia soars twenty-four places to 9. The Presidents of the USA's Peaches is new at 8, and Robert Miles' Children drops three to 7. Everything But The Girl's Walking Wounded enters at 6, and Mark Snow's The X-Files falls three to 5. Michael Jackson's They Don't Care About Us is fresh at 4, and The Prodigy's Firestarter drops from the top to 3. Gina G's Ooh, Aah ... Just A Little Bit climbs three to 2, and OTF Marmite, Mark Morrison's Return of the Mack, jumps two to 1.

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                          The Prodigy is probably the only track that still matters.

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                            I think Give Me a Little More Time and Ooh Ah ... Just a Little Bit are absolute classics as well. I genuinely think the latter is the best song the UK has ever entered for Eurovision.

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                              Yep, Firestarter remains a great and near-genre-defining moment.

                              The Presidents Of The USA - a band that many will have forgotten ever existed. Despite constantly decrying their own ability and chances of making it, their debut album went triple-platinum in the US, while over here they charted four UK Top 40 singles - of which this was the highest-placed. (The best however was Lump.)

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                                Originally posted by Disco Child Ballads View Post
                                I think Give Me a Little More Time and Ooh Ah ... Just a Little Bit are absolute classics as well. I genuinely think the latter is the best song the UK has ever entered for Eurovision.
                                I concur with most of this statement - I think that Spaceman a couple of years ago is the UK's best ever entry to Eurovision.

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                                  In 1973, Roxy Music's Pyjamarama remains at 10, and Shirley Bassey's Never, Never, Never slips the minimum to 9. David Bowie's Drive-In Saturday soars eight to 8, and Cliff's Power To All Our Friends stays at 7. Donny Osmond's The Twelfth Of Never tumbles two to 6, as does David Cassidy's I'm A Clown/Some Kind Of Summer to 5. Little Jimmy Osmond's Tweedle Dee jumps two to 4, and Gilbert O'Sullivan's Get Down does so from the top to 3. Hello, Hello, I'm Back Again rises three to 2, with Dawn and Tony Orlando's Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Old Oak Tree inching up one to 1.

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                                      Ha, numbers 10 and 8 are fucking amazing, number 2 is alright but as for the rest...

                                      That 1996 chart is very good for the era. A proper classic top 3 - fully agree with Disco Child Ballads on Gina G (heard it all that summer and it stood up really well) - and decent 4 and 6. Was number 5 the regular TV show theme, not a dance version or anything?

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                                        A good year in the charts, but not the best of weeks perhaps. Roxy and Bowie fly the flag for artsy glam in among the teen pop and what-have-you. Get Down was catchy enough I guess.

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                                          Originally posted by delicatemoth View Post
                                          Ha, numbers 10 and 8 are fucking amazing, number 2 is alright but as for the rest...

                                          That 1996 chart is very good for the era. A proper classic top 3 - fully agree with Disco Child Ballads on Gina G (heard it all that summer and it stood up really well) - and decent 4 and 6. Was number 5 the regular TV show theme, not a dance version or anything?
                                          The regular TV show theme, you'll recall, went on for roughly 30-45 seconds at the start, so yes, the beginning was the same, before the single went off on its own tangent.

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                                            Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
                                            A good year in the charts, but not the best of weeks perhaps. Roxy and Bowie fly the flag for artsy glam in among the teen pop and what-have-you. Get Down was catchy enough I guess.
                                            So what are labelling Glitter’s stomper anthem: panto glam?

                                            That Roxy YouTube video really shows what a terrible mover Ferry was/is. Mr Too-Slick doing an awkward Dad Dance. His vocal delivery was always a bit weak, but unique enough to be memorable back then (it’s just very weak in recent years, and needs backing singers to help him out). Pyjamarama is a great tune, though.

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                                              Originally posted by slackster View Post
                                              So what are labelling Glitter’s stomper anthem: panto glam?
                                              Yes, if you like.

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                                                In 2000, Steps' Deeper Shade Of Blue plummets six to 10, while Mel C and Lisa Left Eye Lopez's Never Be The Same Again tumbles two to 9. Two new entries, with Sash! Just Around The Hill at 8, and Jessica Simpson declaring I Wanna Love You Forever at 7. Lock 'n' Load still Blow Ya Mind at 6, and The Bloodhound Gang continue to have The Bad Touch at 5. Sweet Female Attitude's Flowers drops two to 4, and Sisqo's Thong Song is new at 3. Craig David's Fill Me In falls from the top to 2, but fresh at 1 is Fragma's Toca's Miracle.

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                                                    That Bloodhound Gang single was bizarre, the tinny, eurodisco backing and jock-ish posturing of the lyrics a most incongruous pairing.

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