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It's always a number 1 day!

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    That's neat.

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      Twenty years ago today, Amy Studt is new at 10 with Under The Thumb, while Elvis tumbles four to 9 with Rubbernecking. Big Brovaz slip one to 8 with Big Boy, while Travis enters at 7 with Re-Offender. Jamelia is unchanged at 6 with Superstar, while Dido drops the minimum to 5 with White Flag. S Club 8 go straight in at 4 with Sundown, while the Darkness slip one to 3 with I Believe In A Thing Called Love. Rachel Stevens jumps one to 2 with Sweet Dreams My LA Ex, while The Black Eyed Peas remain at 1 with Where Is The Love.

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          The Black Eyed Peas did something great there, such a shame that they chose the path that said "bland autotuned drivel for easy money".

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            The rest of that chart is a lot of beige wishy washy stuff with a couple of absolute turds floating in it (the ones beginning with D).

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              The best thing about The Darkness's success was just how mercifully brief it was.

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                Originally posted by Discordant Resonance View Post
                S Club 8
                Oh, the changing number was a thing wasn't it.

                Champion of 21st century pop though I am, this one is hard to get enthused about.

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                  Apparently, they were S Club Juniors, who were then renamed, with two of the members joining the Saturdays.

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                    Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
                    The best thing about The Darkness's success was just how mercifully brief it was.
                    They really should have been Christmas number 1 that year. Mad World wasn't a bad song, but an original Christmas song at number 1 for the last time before X Factor came along to destroy the Christmas chart would have been great.

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                      Agh that version of Mad World is hideous. I remember hyping the original in the school playground - "this is gonna be huge!"

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                        Originally posted by Simon G View Post
                        They really should have been Christmas number 1 that year. Mad World wasn't a bad song, but an original Christmas song at number 1 for the last time before X Factor came along to destroy the Christmas chart would have been great.
                        Hmm, not for me - that Don’t Let the Bells End-nonsense was just juvenile gubbins.

                        However, let’s just say that 2003 wasn’t a vintage year for festive hits, all told.​

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                          I can hear that Dido song in my head now its been mentioned. Can't remember the words. All her songs were Charlie Brown's Teacher "mwah mwah mwah" singing.

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                            The Darkness were a pisstake that worked up until when they wanted to be a real band.

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                              The Darkness were praised to the high heavens on here at the time by a certain former poster and Chart Music contributor. Even the second album.

                              That Travis single Re-Offender was the one that ended their imperial phase (such as it was) immediately. A lilting ditty about domestic abuse in the lead singer's childhood home did not go down well with the Flowers In The Window audience.

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                                Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
                                I can hear that Dido song in my head now its been mentioned. Can't remember the words. All her songs were Charlie Brown's Teacher "mwah mwah mwah" singing.
                                I always thought she was part goose, what with her randomly breaking into a honk when she tested her vocal range.

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                                  Originally posted by Auntie Beryl View Post
                                  That Travis single Re-Offender was the one that ended their imperial phase (such as it was) immediately. A lilting ditty about domestic abuse in the lead singer's childhood home did not go down well with the Flowers In The Window audience.
                                  By then, however, the damage had been done and the most successful UK guitar bands were toning it all down in Fran Healey's wake. You know the culprits.

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                                    In 1980, Thin Lizzy climb 8 to 10 with Killer On The Loose, while Black Slate jump 1 to 9 with Amigo. Randy Crawford tumbles three to 8 with One Day, I'll Fly Away, and Odyssey soar a whopping 13 places to 7 with If You're Looking For A Way Out. The Specials are up 19 to 6 with Stereotype, while Diana Ross inches up one to 5 with My Old Piano. Steve Wonder falls one to 4 with Masterblaster/Jamming, while Madness ascend one to 3 with Baggy Trousers. Ottawan make the same move to 2 with D.I.S.C.O, but The Police remain at 1 with Don't Stand So Close To Me.​​​

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                                        Now that's a Top 10 that I can get behind; I'm not familiar with Black Slate and I can take or leave much of Ms Ross's material, but the rest are bangers.

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                                          Black Slate featured with this hit on the TOTP repeat last week. Good tune, IMO.​

                                          The Thin Lizzy track received a BBC ban for its lyric apparently glorifying rape, so I'd not be getting behind that.

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                                            Originally posted by delicatemoth View Post
                                            That's got me thinking about my earliest musical memories:-

                                            'Bohemian Rhapsody' on TOTP - first memory of any kind, that bit with their heads in that diamond formation.
                                            'Sailing' clip with Rod's hair blowing in the wind- used to think this was my earliest memory but Taylor tracked it down to a reissue or re-entry post the Queen one.
                                            'Save Your Kisses For Me' - I was puzzled that the singer wanted to kiss a baby. First song I remember thinking sounded like fever.
                                            'I Feel Love'
                                            'Oxygene'
                                            ....
                                            I'm only slightly older so these resonate, as well as the other behemoth of the time, 'Mull of Kintyre'. Growing up as the youngest, with two much older sisters who were prime pop age by then, and and even older brother who was very much into heavy rock meant that there was always music playing somewhere and TOTP and taping the charts were constant features in our house. Slightly older singles were still a feature as well and my sisters still take the piss at family gatherings about my fondness as a little kid for what I called 'Mama Gone', or to give it its proper title 'Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep', and I also liked 'Son of My Father', so I was clearly set up for a life spent watching football.

                                            Things I learned today crossover fact - 'Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep' is one of fewer than fifty singles to have sold more than ten million physical copies worldwide.

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                                              In 1957, Elvis is All Shook Up, slipping two places to 10, while Buddy Holly and the Crickets inch up one to 9 with That'll Be The Day. At joint 7 are Charlie Grace (up two) with I Love You So Much It Hurts/Wanderin' Eyes, and Petula Clarke (down one) With All My Heart. Tommy Steele and the Steelemen slip the minimum to 6 with Water Water/A Handful of Songs, as does Harry Belafonte to 5 with Island In The Sun. Johnny Duncan and the Bluegrass Boys tumble two to 4 with Last Train to San Fernando, while Debbie Reynolds jumps four to 3 with Tammy. Paul Anka climbs one to 2 with Love Letters In The Sand, while Paul Anka remains at 1 with Diana.

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                                                  Originally posted by Walt Flanagans Dog View Post
                                                  'Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep' is one of fewer than fifty singles to have sold more than ten million physical copies worldwide.
                                                  Where can I find the complete list?

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                                                    Originally posted by Sporting View Post

                                                    Where can I find the complete list?
                                                    I wondered the same when I read it here, but the supporting reference is to a book rather than another online source.

                                                    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chir...py_Cheep_Cheep

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