Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

It's always a number 1 day!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
    Hmm, 'cherry wine' sounds pretty grim, tbh. Not sure that was going to get Jermaine too much of a good time, clothes on or off. ('God rest his soul', and all that.)


    .
    It did rather suggest a Thunderbird/Night Train Express type blackout on a budget, as if Jermaine was suggesting a chaste yet fun night sleeping rough in the railroad yards. We don't have to take our clothes off for five months until spring comes round again, or sooner if we are arrested for vagrancy.

    Comment


      ...in which case we might well be taking them off and replacing them with prison overalls.

      Comment


        Originally posted by delicatemoth View Post
        I was really shocked when I heard the original of 'Walk This Way', it's so weedy. Run DMC did a great job there.
        .
        Aerosmith are dross, almost as bad as Kiss.

        Comment


          Originally posted by Benjm View Post

          Aerosmith are dross, almost as bad as Kiss.
          This. 100 times this.

          Comment


            Very early Aerosmith - before the cocaine took hold and Steven Tyler could do more than just screech - are fine. No more than fine, mind.

            Comment


              That Jermaine Stewart song has me retuning the radio whenever it comes on. It's like nails down a blackboard to my ears.

              Comment


                Try it after a bottle of cherry wine. Okay, two bottles

                Comment


                  Tomorrow in 1968, Amen Corner are up 1 to 10 with High In The Sky, while the Dave Clark Five float 10 places to 9 with Red Balloon. Aretha Franklin slips two places to 8 with I Say A Little Prayer, while Union Gap jump three to 7 with Lady Willpower. The Bee Gees tumble three spots to 6 with I've Got To Get A Message To You, while Johnny Nash stays at 5 with Hold Me Tight. Leapy Lee flies up five spots to 4 with Little Arrows, and the top three all remain the same, so the Casuals are at 3 with Jesamine. The Beatles are at 2 with Hey Jude, and Mary Hopkins is at 1 with Those Were The Days.

                  Comment






                    Comment


                      Let's just say that Gary Puckett and his pals may have rather repeated the formula of their recent chart-topper with this follow-up hit.

                      (Oh, and it's Mary Hopkin - a singer we oh-so-humorously referred to as 'Hairy Mopkin' back in the playground.)

                      Originally posted by Sean of the Shed View Post
                      That Jermaine Stewart song has me retuning the radio whenever it comes on. It's like nails down a blackboard to my ears.
                      Thankfully I don't listen to a station that's ever likely to play it.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Jah Womble View Post
                        Think so. That Stedman guy seems to have gone briefly into renting out limos, so I guess he took something from the experience. (His life since seems to have taken a darker turn, with a conviction for public indecency and death threats from his own father/former manager...)

                        Marc Bolan and Noel Gallagher are a couple of other music names that had/have expensive/vintage motors without being able to drive. Guess it's an investment thing.
                        I believe Bono has the largest collection of hatchbacks in the country..

                        Comment


                          Who the heck was Leapy Lee anyway, and why?

                          Comment


                            The cover was a hit here for a showband called The Indians, whose novelty was dressing in Native American regalia.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
                              Who the heck was Leapy Lee anyway, and why?
                              And you're the only one amongst us who can answer that...

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by Discordant Resonance View Post
                                The cover was a hit here for a showband called The Indians, whose novelty was dressing in Native American regalia.
                                The lead singer lived near me ,and I briefly played indoor football with his brother.

                                Comment


                                  Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
                                  Who the heck was Leapy Lee anyway, and why?
                                  Leapy Lee? British country-tinged pop singer who had one-and-a-half hits in the 1960s/70s. Little Arrows was his ‘biggie’, hitting number two here and making the Billboard Top 20 in 1968.

                                  Not much to report, really. His management were the only ones I remember who actively tried to get him onto the NMTB ID Parade. (For which he’d have received on-screen humiliation and about 70. Don’t know whether it ever happened.)

                                  Originally posted by Fargo Boyle View Post

                                  I believe Bono has the largest collection of hatchbacks in the country..
                                  I thought he was all about the Trabant?

                                  Comment


                                    I think I've mentioned here before that whenever that Jermaine Stewart song came on the radio in the sixth form common room after the line 'we don't have to take our clothes off to have a good time' I'd always add 'with Frank Bough'. Turned out you probably did.

                                    Comment


                                      Today in 1956, Tony Martin slips one to 10 with Walk Hand In Hand, while Lonnie Donegan stumbles two to 9 with Bring A Little Water Sylvie/Dead Or Alive. The Platters fall two to 8 with The Great Pretender/Only You, while the Goons are also down four to 7 with The Ying Tong Song. Freddie Bell and The Bellboys soar ten spots to 6 with Giddy-Up-A-Ding-Dong, while Billy Haley and the Comets drop the minimum to 5 with Rocking Through The Rye. Elvis inches up one to 4 with Hound Dog, while Frankie Laine rises five to 3 with A Woman In Love. Doris Kappelhoff (who unsurprisingly changed her name to Day) remains at 2 with Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera), while Ann Shelton is still at 1 with Lay Down Your Arms.

                                      Comment






                                        Comment


                                          Originally posted by Discordant Resonance View Post
                                          In 1954's Top 12, Anthony Steel and the Revellers begin the chart as a new entry, with West of Zanzibar, as is Max Bygraves at 11 with Gilly Gilly Ossenfeffer Katzenellen Bogen By The Sea. Doris Day falls from 5 to 10 with Secret Love, as does Perry Como from 7 to 9 with Idle Gossip. Jointly at 7 are Al Martino (falling from 6) with Wanted, and Doris Day (climbing from 8) with The Black Hills of Dakota. Nat King Cole is new at 6 with Smile, while Don Cornell jumps from 10 to 5 with Hold My Hand. Frankie Laine remains at 4 with My Friend, and David Whitfield finally tumbles from the top to 3 with Cara Mia. Frank Sinatra ascends from 3 to 2 with Three Coins In The Fountain, but Kitty Kallen moves to 1 with Little Things Mean A Lot.
                                          I know six of these songs. bloody hell.

                                          Comment


                                            Originally posted by Discordant Resonance View Post
                                            The Platters fall two to 8 with The Great Pretender/Only You,
                                            Fucking hell but that's a good value single.

                                            Comment


                                              It's 1989, protests are raging in East Germany, and Madonna tumbles three to 10 with Cherish, while Bros are new at 9 with Chocolate Box. The Beautiful South inch up one to 8 with You Keep It All In, and Tina Turner slips two to 7 with The Best. Wet Wet Wet soar an astonishing eight places to 6 with Sweet Surrender, while Richard Marx falls three to 5 with Right Here Waiting. Erasure jump two to 4 with Drama!, while Sydney Youngblood climbs the minimum to 3 with If Only I Could. Technotronic do the same to 2 with Pump Up The Jam, while Black Box are unchanged at 1 with Ride On Time.

                                              Comment






                                                Comment


                                                  Meh! Erasure apart, it wouldn't upset me if I never heard a single one of those songs again.

                                                  Comment


                                                    Just read a few pages of this thread to catch up and one thing that strikes me is how many of these songs seem to have disappeared into the ether. There's a good percentage where I've not heard of the artist let alone the particular song.

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X