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Spoken Word Music

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  • Strangers On A Train
    replied
    Our English teacher would play us an album by John Betjeman (Banana Blush?), I remember the track Licorice Fields in Pontefract being a particular favourite.
    Also Vivian Stanshall’s Sir Henry at Rawlinson End contains mostly spoken word whimsy and is a work of genius.

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  • G-Man
    replied
    But by way of recommendation, I love Bama The Village Poet, who took the baton from The Last Poets (who are even more proto rap than Scott-Heron). This is so completely brilliant on every level:


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  • G-Man
    replied
    No love for Telly Savalas' "If"?

    But, in seriousness, listening to a whole album of spoken word requires the investment of attention. Good if you're driving or doing some menial task like washing up (lots and lots of dishes) or assembling a model ship.

    I would not recommend listening to a whole album of William Shatner's 1960s spoken word efforts, but it's fun dipping in. It's quite demented. On LSD, his delivery of "the girl with kaleidoscope eyes" is one of the funniest moments in pop music.





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  • gjw100
    replied
    Like dd's choice this could also go into the 'Stories In Songs' thread. Ursula Rucker's 'Return To Innocence Lost' is a tough listen, but then she has never pulled her punches.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    This could be a cross-post with the "stories you like in songs" thread, but I love the mordant pathos of this Tindersticks song, "My Sister"

    Last edited by diggedy derek; 26-05-2023, 19:31. Reason: much superior Peel sessions version

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  • steveeeeeeeee
    replied
    All great shouts. "White Light/White Heat" has a fair bit of spoken word on it, and I really like that album. Also Dexys and Nation of Ulysses do spoken word sections to their albums which are absolutely essential to the overall feel of the collection of music.

    Maybe I just don't like Arab Strap? It's that type of delivery, which sort of rejects the actual rhythm present in the music, that I can't get on with.

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  • Gert from the Well
    replied
    Kae Tempest would be perfect for you.

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  • Satchmo Distel
    replied
    Ivor Cutler.

    Gil Scott-Heron, although he's really a prototype rapper.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    This is a lovely album of mantric meditation texts or something, with a stellar cast of krautrock/kosmische players as a supporting cast

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  • gjw100
    replied
    Originally posted by Stumpy Pepys View Post

    Ken Nordine's Colors LP is quite something.
    It is indeed. Slightly unhinged but rather compelling.

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  • Stumpy von Pepys
    replied
    Originally posted by gjw100 View Post
    Jazz poetry anyone? Ken Nordine's 'As Of Now'.
    Ken Nordine's Colors LP is quite something.

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  • Giggler
    replied
    Originally posted by ad hoc View Post
    I also loved this, which was a poem by Simon Armitage (linking Eyam and the black death to Covid during the first big lockdown) set to music
    LYR was my first thought when I saw this thread title. This, based on Desire As by Prefab Sprout and featuring Wendy Smith, is lovely.



    another vote for I Trawl the Meghertz too. I remember reading an intriguing review of it in Word (before it became The Word) and buying it out of sheer curiosity. It didn’t disappoint. The original artwork would look great blown up and framed.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    Jazz poetry anyone? Ken Nordine's 'As Of Now'.

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  • Furtho
    replied
    Never heard anything else by the band, The Aerial Maps, which I believe serves as a vehicle for the main dude's spoken word stuff, but man I love their track On The Punt.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    Oh, I like listening to William S Burroughs.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    I also loved this, which was a poem by Simon Armitage (linking Eyam and the black death to Covid during the first big lockdown) set to music

    Leave a comment:


  • ad hoc
    replied
    Yeah, I'm with DD on I trawl the megahertz. It's absolutely incredible

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    I do really like I Trawl The Megahertz. That's a really singular piece of work.

    Other than that...

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  • steveeeeeeeee
    started a topic Spoken Word Music

    Spoken Word Music

    I guess I have to be careful here, because I love rap music. But Gideon Coe plays quite a lot of this stuff, such as Aidan Moffat, which is alright, but I can't imagine buying it or repeatedly playing an album of spoken word in any circumstance. Maybe it's alright if you're doing a long drive on your own.

    It ticks neither box of short story or mood inducing instrumental. I just don't find it appealing. Anyone agree? And if you disagree, what is the good stuff I'm missing out on?
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