Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A-ha

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gerontophile
    replied
    OK, I'm done. Anyone ever met an anti-A-Ha person?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    Well, there'sa memory I didn't think I would like. Fuck. There were 4 of us, and we were ...itching "when does the band start?" stuff... and then it started. They were fucking awful, but the sound, was luminous.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    Thank you. That concludes the Norwegian jury for this evening.

    I don't know where this shaky shit comes from, or from whom... I was at this concert. It was my birthday present.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpwTl1xS3RY

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    Sorry. Getting bored now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3ir9HC9vYg

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    Sorry, only just remembered/realised... they filmed all of those songs, at the same time? I wrote a fucking thesis about "Take On Me", and I missed the part where they were saving money on the next 3 videos. Goddamn it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR2OwmariWk

    I LOVE Timothy Dalton, but oh fuck is he a smug cunt.

    **But, fair play to him for miming the kissing scenes with Ms D'Abo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    So, "The Living Daylights, then... 2nd best James Bond theme?

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    (Fucking Ireland and UK)

    That was it. "meh" sales all over Europe. Fuck all in the US. I'm officially annoyed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gerontophile
    replied
    So, yeah. Take on Me" worldwide hit. "The Sun Always...", probably a worldwide hit?

    I never once mentioned one-hit wonders. I only mentioned the underestimation.

    (I fucking love these tangents. THIS, is why I am on otf.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Come on, The Silencers weren't that bad. (Were they?)

    Leave a comment:


  • Lang Spoon
    replied
    Originally posted by The Awesome Berbaslug!!! View Post
    Speaking of bands that were big in america relative to their home market, The cranberries were more likely to fill a venue in america than dublin until quite far into their career. Linger didn't chart here in 1993, but it was no.8 in the US hot 100. and then we bought a few copies. You only have to sell a couple of hundred singles to get into the irish top ten.
    They were fucking massive in Catalonia as late as 2000. Fucked up. But then I've had French folk excitedly talk about The Silencers upon finding I was Scotch, I'd as soon as put on Hue and Cry as a fucking Silencers lp.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    If we can include Norn Irish as well, then I think any number of Feargal Sharkey vocal performances might qualify: in hit terms, The Undertones's My Perfect Cousin and The Assembly's Never Never stand out.

    Leave a comment:


  • caja-dglh
    replied
    Best Irish accent in pop - The Cranberries "Fool" in Linger or B*Witched's "What am I like?".

    Leave a comment:


  • The Awesome Berbaslug!!!
    replied
    Speaking of bands that were big in america relative to their home market, The cranberries were more likely to fill a venue in america than dublin until quite far into their career. Linger didn't chart here in 1993, but it was no.8 in the US hot 100. and then we bought a few copies. You only have to sell a couple of hundred singles to get into the irish top ten.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    I think there's something in that, and also in the fact that Gavin Rossdale's vocal stylings were near-enough a facsimile of those of the recently-departed Kurt Cobain, which would've helped Bush's US-push. Even Courtney Love was moved to comment on this publicly. (There may of course have been an ulterior motive at work there...)

    However, I think Bush can be described as having been 'huge' in the States - just not perhaps for all that long. (That debut album did six million copies there.)

    As had been documented on here several times previously (probably by me), during the eighties there were a whole slew of British new-wave bands that did much better trade in America.

    Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post
    * Are there examples of bands in the UK or Europe that are enormous live draws but not really big "stars" on the charts?
    As others are suggesting, plenty of current rock acts do well on tour but cannot get a sniff of a hit single anymore.

    With the charts now so messed up and irrelevant in the UK, a better context is needed: in the early eighties - ie, when the Top 40/75 had huge relevance - UK supergroup Asia (for example) never managed anything like a proper hit single here, but would've sold out arenas left, right and centre.

    Leave a comment:


  • Greenlander
    replied
    Bush, at least over here as I remember it, seemed to be predominantly seen as big in the states because our man went out with that Gwen Stefani and they were big news here for a couple of years. Their big chart song in the UK, Swallowed, came after probably getting mainstream radio play because it was the band with the singer who dates the one from No Doubt.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I’ve never dropped acid so I don’t see the appeal of the jam band experience. I’m not really a concert person either. But they’re pretty harmless.

    I suppose Britain had other kinds of drug-oriented music.


    Bush were more popular here than in the UK but I wouldn’t say they were “huge.” It’s all relative, I guess. They certainly sold a lot of records but I have no idea who was buying them.

    Leave a comment:


  • caja-dglh
    replied
    The jam bands never did shit in the UK, and justly so.

    The most modern easy reference is Bush (though the album swallowed is on did go platinum) as they were basically pitched as “that British band that is huge in America”.

    I would think plenty hip-hop artists will qualify in the UK but a decade has passed since I had any idea about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Or that we probably have over 200 arenas that hold 10,000 or more

    Leave a comment:


  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    The nature of the music market here is such as that virtually no one is universally big across the whole country
    That's what I was getting at really, but we didn't realise that at the time. The British press (music or mainstream) was fond of declaring for example that someone was "playing a stadium tour" or "touring baseball stadiums" when what was really happening was tour of various sized venues with stadium shows in the big alternative markets of NY and LA, and avoiding large parts of the country completely.

    And don't get me started on bands being described by our media as "playing an arena tour in America" which, while technically true, glossed over the fact that they were the opening act for a much bigger band.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    The nature of the music market here is such as that virtually no one is universally big across the whole country

    Leave a comment:


  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    The changes to the Singles Chart mean that it is quite common here for a band to hit the level of arena/stadium band or decent sized festival headliner, without any singles chart 'hits' to speak of.

    On the earlier question, The Cure and Depeche Mode were playing to more people in the US around that time than they were (relatively) in the UK, when stadium gigs were relatively rare and before the boom in festivals. It was actually mainstream media news here when Depeche Mode played the Rose Bowl, and it was baffling to most people that they were that big (although in practice they weren't universally big across the whole country, but they didn't publicise that bit so much).

    ​​​​​

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    To be clear, there are two issues here. One is whether one's status as a one-hit-wonder should be evaluated country-by-country. I happen to think the countries that are OHW in one side of the Atlantic but multi-hit career stars on the other are more interesting than either true OHW that just flame out, so I think it makes sense to look at it that way insofar as this is a topic worth caring about at all.

    But whether a band was actually a OHW in a particular country is an entirely separate question. It seems that, depending on what counts as a "hit," A-Ha just don't qualify and their inclusion on these lists is just a straight up error.


    Speaking of UK bands that seemed to be poised to have a lot of success in the US but didn't....According to Wikipedia, Adam and the Ants never charted in the US Billboard Main Hot 100, but Adam Ant did a few years later. A&tA did make some of the subcharts like "mainstream rock" and dance. None of his albums, under either name, made the US top 40.

    I recall that "Goody Two Shoes" was a big deal on MTV and his whole schtick was popular among the students at Radio Park Elementary School. I can see why he didn't do much over here pre-MTV, but not why he didn't have any more hits after that.



    Otherwise, the only overall trend I can see in why an act might be massive in the UK but not so much in the US is that it seems like there was a deliberate and concentrated anti-New Wave effort in the US in the mid 80s. It was not entirely unlike the anti-disco backlash of the late 70s. But disco really didn't have anywhere else to go, while at least some of the New Wave/synthy bands could count as "post punk" and get some US fans through the emerging "college music" avenue in the 80s. Bands like New Order, The Cure and Depeche Mode did well with that marketing channel, for lack of a better term. They weren't as massive as they were in Europe, perhaps, but I just realized that Depeche Mode's big Rose Bowl gigs were in 1988. Two years before Violator. I have no recollection of them being on MTV or commercial radio between "People are People" and "Enjoy The Silence." Indeed, in 1988, I didn't know they were still together. But obviously, they found an audience here anyway.




    I'm sure we've done this before, but I can't recall if there are any examples of the the opposite situation - bands that were popular for a long while in the US but had just one or two hits in the UK or Europe.

    Perhaps some singer-songwriter types. Like Jewel. But I'm not sure she's had anything that counts as a hit in the UK.

    And I suspect that country music is not more than a niche interest in the UK, but I'm not sure if any of them have had even one bonafide hit in the UK.

    The obvious possibility are the "jam bands" or "neo-hippy" bands of the 90s. As far as I can tell, Dave Matthews Band only reached the UK singles chart once. "The Space Between" hit #35. Then again, they never really had any super massive hits on the US Main Hot 100 either. They had a bunch of #1s on the "adult alternative" chart, but didn't hit #1 or come close on the hot 100.

    Their popularity, such as it is, is mostly about their big stadium gigs. They were - and to some extent still are - a massively popular live act.*

    Incidentally, it turns out that the Spin Doctors - the Spin Doctors - were arguably more successful outside the US than in it. I would not have guessed that.

    And the Connells hit #14 in the UK with '74-'75, which did not even make the alternative charts here, but a bunch of other songs of there's did.

    Otherwise, they're an example of a truly regional college rock band, which is a whole other topic.


    * Are there examples of bands in the UK or Europe that are enormous live draws but not really big "stars" on the charts?


    Last edited by Hot Pepsi; 06-05-2021, 21:45.

    Leave a comment:


  • MsD
    replied
    Just looked at this from 2008 - beaten by 0,2 % There was a long-running battle for Ultimate 80s single between Stand and Deliver and Take On Me and some people got very invested indeed as it swung between the two for weeks. Hilarious in retrospect.

    "The ULTIMATE 80s SINGLE POLL - which has been running here for the last two months - is now over, and from the initial 128 SONGS nominated by visitors to this site we finally have one overall WINNER...

    It has been an AMAZING eight weeks during which I have received loads of messages from people who have simply loved participating, THANK YOU to everyone who voted (and that is literally thousands of you!) and of course CONGRATULATIONS to A-HA who managed to beat ADAM & THE ANTS by just 0.2% in what was an incredible nail-biting battle over the final week of the poll..."



    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    TSASOTV just about went silver in the US, whereas Take On Me had been a platinum Billboard number one - and the tenth best-selling single of 1985.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X