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    From Brazilian pianist Antonio Adolfo’s 2017 album ‘Hybrido: From Rio To Wayne Shorter’, a re-working Brazilian-style of eight Wayne Shorter compositions, this is ‘Deluge’, with Marcelo Martins saxophones, Sergio de Souza trombone, Jesse Sadoc trumpet, Jorge Helder bass, Lula Galvao guitar, Rafael Barata drums and Andre Siqueira percussion.
     

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      The title track from Argentine saxophonist Gato Barbieri’s 1974 album ‘Yesterdays’, with a typically fiery Barbieri on tenor, Jorge Dalto piano, Paul Metzke guitar, Ron Carter bass, Bernard ‘Pretty’ Purdie drums and Raymond Mantilla timbales.
       

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        Talking about South America, the 'Da Hora' cd of this double compilation album is great.

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          Blind from birth, Eric Kloss acquired his first saxophone at the age of 10, was playing with Sonny Stitt at 12 and had recorded his first album by 16. He released a string of further albums throughout the 60’s and 70’s, but seems rather a forgotten figure these days. This is the title track from his 1972 album ‘Doors’, with Kloss on tenor saxophone, Neil Creque electric piano, Gene Taylor bass and Ron Krasinski drums.
           

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            Alto saxophonist David Sanborn has always been a fine, bluesy player, right from his very early days in New York with Mike and Randy Brecker. His reputation suffered somewhat during the 80’s with the release of a number of best-selling albums that too often veered into smooth jazz territory, although in fairness even then he had a great deal more to offer than the likes of Kenny G. This is Bill Frisell’s ‘Monica Jane’ from Sanborn’s 1991 album ‘Another Hand’, with Bill Frisell guitar, Charlie Haden bass, Joey Baron drums, Leon Pendarvis organ, Lenny Pickett tenor saxophone, Art Baron trombone and Don Alias percussion.
             

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              The missus persuaded me to go and see Sanborn (with Marcus Miller) a couple of years ago and while there was still some 80s-cheese, it was so much better than I feared. And I've seen Joey Baron a couple of times in different bands, and he is incredible to watch.

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                If it were down to me, Norway would be a cert for a quarter-final place at least in Etienne's World Cup of Music. I’ve previously posted tracks by Terje Rypdal, Nils Petter Molvaer, Eivind Aarset, Arve Henriksen, Mats Eilertsen, Marius Neset and Jaga Jazzist. Here are a couple more to strengthen my case. First up, ‘Hug’ from Frode Haltli’s joyous 2018 album ‘Avant Folk’, with Haltli on accordion, Hildegunn Oiseth trumpet, Rolf-Erik Nystrom saxophone, Hans Kjorstad violin, Stale Storlokken keyboards, Juhani Silvola guitar/electronics, Erlend Apneseh hardanger fiddle, Fredrik Dietrichson bass and Siv Oyenn Kjenstad drums/vocals.
                 

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                  'Tanauka’ by Jon Balke’s Batagraf group from the 2018 album ‘Delights Of Decay’, with Balke on keyboards, electronics and percussion, Trygve Seim tenor & soprano saxophones, Matthias Eick trumpet, Helge Norbakken percussion/vocals, Snorre Bjerck percussion/vocals, plus Emilie Christensen, Ingeborg Mohn and Julia Witek vocals.
                   

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                    Marion Brown’s ‘Maimoun’ from his 1975 album ‘Vista’, with Brown on alto saxophone, Stanley Cowell piano, Reggie Workman bass, Ed Blackwell drums and Jose Goico percussion.
                     

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                      ‘The First Stone’ from Canadian saxophonist Ralph Bowen’s 2001 album ‘Soul Proprietor’, with Sam Yahel organ, Peter Bernstein guitar, John Swana trumpet and Brian Blade drums.
                       

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                        I've kind of been embarrassed to return to this thread having promised a spotify playlist, but I think I have to accept the fact that there is little to no chance of my ever completing this task and fess up. At least then i can listen to jazz again without feeling guilty and also share some stuff. So, soz, jazzthreaders. Playlist is non-imminent.

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                          Hah. Don't worry on my account ad hoc. I'm sorry for turning it into something of a Forth Bridge paint job for you, but I do tend to let my enthusiasm run away with me. Looking forward to you contributing some more posts anyway.

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                            For over five decades, Manfred Eicher’s ECM record company has been the most important institution in European jazz music. Like Blue Note in the 60’s/70’s, the label has evolved a distinctive sound and style; from the pin sharp quality of the recordings (most produced by Eicher and engineered by Jan Erik Kongshaug) to the artwork and design of the album sleeves, everything comes together to produce something that is instantly recognisable as an ECM release. Over the years the roster of artists signed to the label has included famous names like Keith Jarrett, Gary Burton and Pat Metheny, but ECM’s true importance lies in Eicher’s willingness to offer a home to emerging European artists who might otherwise have struggled to find an outlet for their talents.

                            Jan Garbarek, Terje Rypdal and Eberhard Weber all came to prominence on the label in the early 70’s, and today there’s a wealth of younger artists following in their footsteps. For anyone wanting an introduction to ECM, the 20 volume ‘rarum’ series of selected recordings by their most prominent artists is a good starting point. Beyond that, there’s a back catalogue of over 1,600 releases that is worthy of investigation.

                            ECM001. The title track from Sinikka Langeland’s 2016 album ‘The Magical Forest’, with Langeland on kantele (a traditional Baltic stringed instrument), Arve Henriksen trumpet, Trygve Seim soprano and tenor saxophones, Anders Jormin bass and Markku Ounaskari drums. A perfect example of Manfred Eicher’s knack for bringing different musicians together in the studio, knowing instinctively which collaborations will provide the sound that best serves the artist whose album he is producing.
                             

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                              ECM002. ‘Touch’ by Eberhard Weber from his 1976 album ‘Yellow Fields’, with Weber on bass, Charlie Mariano soprano saxophone and nagaswaram, Rainer Bruninghaus keyboards and Jon Christensen drums.
                               

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                                ECM003. The title track from drummer/percussionist Thomas Stronen’s 2018 album ‘Lucus’, with Ole Morten Vagan bass, Leo Svensson Sander cello, Hakon Aase violin and Ayumi Tanaka piano.
                                 

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                                  ECM004. From South Korea, this is the Near East Quartet with ‘Jinyang’, taken from their self-titled 2018 album. Sungjae Son tenor saxophone, Suwuk Chung guitar, Sujin Suh drums and Yulhee Kim vocals.
                                   

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                                    ECM005. ‘Sand’ from the 1974 album ‘Solstice’ by Oregon’s Ralph Towner. With Towner on 12-string guitar & piano, Jan Garbarek tenor/soprano saxophones, Eberhard Weber bass & cello and Jon Christensen drums/percussion.
                                     

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                                      ECM006. From last year's ‘Big Vicious’ album, this is Avishai Cohen’s version of Massive Attack’s ‘Teardrop’, with Cohen on trumpet, synthesizer and electronics, Uzi Ramirez guitar, Yonatan Albalak bass, Aviv Cohen drums and Ziv Ravitz drums/samples.
                                       

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                                        Body And Soul - Coleman Hawkins, October 11, 1939

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                                          ECM007. ‘Song For Her’ from Manu Katche’s 2007 album ‘Playground’, with Katche on drums/percussion, Mathias Eick trumpet, Trygve Seim tenor/soprano saxophones, Marcin Wasilewski piano, Slawomir Kurkiewicz double bass and David Torn guitar.
                                           

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                                            ECM008. ‘To Stanko’, guitarist Jakob Bro’s tribute to the late Tomasz Stanko, taken from his 2021 album ‘Uma Elmo’, with Arve Henriksen trumpet and Jorge Rossy drums/percussion.
                                             

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                                              ECM009.‘Gagarine’ from Nicolas Masson’s 2018 album ‘Travelers’, with Masson on soprano saxophone, Colin Vallon piano, Patrice Moret bass and Lionel Friedli drums.
                                               

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                                                The ever-dependable Gilles Peterson’s Brownswood label has long been a vehicle for promoting new talent - the longstanding ‘Brownswood Bubblers’ series and the ‘We Out Here’ album that serves as a useful introduction to the current crop of young British jazz musicians are just two examples. Peterson has also been assiduous in promoting World music over the years, and has curated some great Cuban, African and two Brazilian compilations, one of which Tony C. posted about last week. The latest of these compilations, ‘Indaba Is’, was recorded last summer in Johannesburg and released only last week. This is ‘Prelude To Writing Together’ by The Ancestors, with Mthunzi Mvubu on saxophones & flute, Siyabonga Mthembu vocals, Nduduzo Makhathini electric piano, Mandla Mlangeni trumpet, Ariel Zamonsky bass, Tumi Mogorosi drums and Gontse Makhene percussion.
                                                 

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                                                  This is Bokani Dyer’s ‘Ke Nako’, with Dyer on piano & vocals, Sisonke Xonti tenor saxophone, Ndaba Zulu trumpet, Amaeshi Ikechi bass, Simphiwe Tshabalala drums, Thandi Ntuli vocals and Siyabonga Mthembu vocals.
                                                   

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                                                    Finally, and I think my favourite, Thandi Ntuli’s ‘Dikeledi’, Ntuli on keyboards and vocals, Sthembiso Bhengu trumpet, Mthunzi Mvubu alto saxophone, Keenan Ahrends guitar, Shane Cooper bass, Sphelelo Mazibuko drums and Nompumelelo Nhlapo percussion.
                                                     

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