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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Dear Geri’ from the 2020 album ‘Eternal Dance’ by Monika Herzog’s Sheroes – Herzog piano, Jamie Baum flute, Lakecia Benjamin alto saxophone, Reut Regev trombone, Jennifer Vincent bass and Rosa Avila drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Midwestern Gothic’ from Amanda Gardier’s 2020 album ‘Flyover Country’, with Gardier on alto and tenor saxophones, Ellie Pruneau piano, Brendan Keller-Tuberg bass and Carrington Clinton drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    The title track from the 2012 album ‘Family Tree’, with McCandless on oboe, Towner piano, Moore bass and Mark Walker drums/percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Gekko’ from the 1994 album ‘Troika’, with McCandless on oboe, Towner guitar and Moore bass.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    Oregon came together in 1971 after Ralph Towner, Paul McCandless, Glen Moore and Collin Walcott all left Paul Winter’s Consort, having playing together on the saxophonist’s ‘Road’ album from the previous year. Walcott was tragically killed in a German autobahn accident whilst on tour with the band in 1984, and Moore left in 2015, but Towner and McCandless are still together (although considerably less prolific in the studio and no longer touring). From the 1978 album ‘Out Of The Woods’, the first album of theirs that I owned, this is ‘Cane Fields’, with McCandless on oboe, Towner guitar, Moore bass and Walcott percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Springs And Neaps’ from the 2012 album ‘Subjekt’ by Neon Quartet – Stan Sulzmann alto/soprano saxophones, Kit Downes piano/organ, Jim Hart vibraphone and Tim Giles drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Fearsome’ from Ben Wendel’s 2020 album ‘High Heart’, with Wendel on piano and tenor saxophone, Joe Sanders bass, Nate Wood drums and Michael Mayo vocals/effects.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Vaporbabe’ from Seamus Blake’s 2019 album ‘Guardians Of The Heart Machine’, with Blake on tenor saxophone, Tony Tixier piano, Florent Nisse bass and Gautier Garrigue drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Requiem’ from bassist Gary Peacock’s 1971 album ‘Voices’, with Masabumi Kikuchi piano, Hiroshi Murakami drums and Masahiko Togashi percussion. Thankfully he doesn’t do it very much on this track, but it’s an album slightly spoiled for me by Kikuchi’s tuneless vocal accompaniment to his piano lines a la Keith Jarrett – an occasional foible of Jarrett’s that I always found irritatingly distracting.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘A Blind Man’ from the Shintaro Quintet’s 1984 album ‘Evolution’, featuring Shunzo Ohno trumpet, Robert Kenmotsu tenor saxophone, Jeff Jenkins piano, Shintaro Nakamura bass and Fukushi Tainaka drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Lullaby For The Girl’ from the 1975 album ‘Toki’ by the Hidefumi Toki Quartet, featuring Toki on soprano saxophone, Kazumi Watanabe guitar, Nobuyoshi Ino bass and Steve Jackson drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    I do have 'Dusk', dd, but haven't listened to it in goodness knows how long. My admittedly rusty memory of it is that it's a bit patchy, but given your endorsement I'll maybe give it another listen. Incidentally, in one of those odd coincidences that only the internet can throw up, I see that there's an Edinburgh-based psychoanalyst called Andrew Hill.

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  • diggedy derek
    replied
    Going back a bit in the thread, I absolutely love Andrew Hill. I remember a statement of his that "music's like psychoanalysis. You've got to check it out", which stayed with me for years, even though I can't find the source of it these days. But what a unique and idiosyncratic talent.

    Point Of Departure was I think done almost exactly the same time as Dolphy's Out To Lunch, but POD is weirdly unlovable. It's been described as sombre, but that's not quite it I think. Maybe unyielding, or burdened in some way. I really like it and respect it, and I admire the way it doesn't take the easy option.

    Among some other Hill favourites (a short selection) are Black Fire, Judgment and Pax. But I think my favourite playing of all of his might be on Bobby Hutcherson's Dialogue.

    gjw, do you know his magnificent late period album Dusk?

    ad hoc, glad you managed to get out.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Bowed’ from Josh Johnson’s 2020 album ‘Freedom Exercise’, with Johnson on tenor saxophone and keyboards, Gregory Uhlmann guitar, Anna Butterss bass and Aaron Steele drums/percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Nucleo (Boy From The Prebiotic Birth)’ from keyboard-player John Carroll Kirby’s 2021 album ‘Septet’, with Nick Mancini marimba, Logan Hone flute, Tracy Wannomae bass clarinet, John Paul Maramba bass, Deantoni Parks drums and David Leach percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘House No Wheels’ from Tamil Rogeon’s 2021 album ‘Son Of Nyx’, with Rogeon on viola and synthesizer, Sam Keevers keyboards, Sam Anning bass, Danny Fischer drums and Javier Fredes percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘After Sly’ from the 2019 album ‘For The Ones’ by Cuban trumpeter/vocalist Yelfris Valdes, with Al MacSween electric piano, Josh Barber bass, Dario Congedo drums and Ernesto Marichales percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘New Bamboo’ from the Scott Reeves Quintet’s 2021 album ‘The Alchemist’, with Reeves on trumpet, flugelhorn and electronics, Mike Holober keyboards, Russ Spiegel guitar, Howard Britz bass and Andy Watson drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Room With A View’ from the 2015 album by Ruby Rushton – Ed Cawthorne tenor saxophone, Nick Walters trumpet, Aidan Shepherd keyboards/bass and Yussef Dayes drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    More than fifty years after D’Silva, Harriott and Mayer were breaking new ground, a version of D’Silva’s ‘A Street In Bombay’ from the 2018 album ‘My East Is Your West’ by Sarathy Korwar & UPAJ Collective, featuring Korwar on drums/tabla, Jasdeep Singh Degun sitar, Jesse Bannister alto saxophone, Tamar Osborn baritone saxophone, Al MacSween keyboards, Giuliano Modarelli guitar, Aravinghan Baheerathan bansuri, Domenico Angarano bass, John Ball percussion and B.C Manjunath percussion.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    ‘Raga Piloo’ from the Joe Harriott / John Mayer Double Quintet’s ‘Indo-Jazz Fusion Vol. 2’, the last of the three albums that they recorded between 1966 and 1968. With Harriott on alto saxophone, Mayer violin/harpsichord, Chris Taylor flute, Kenny Wheeler trumpet/flugelhorn, Diwan Motihar sitar, Pat Smythe piano, Chandrahas Paigankar tambura, Coleridge Goode bass, Jackie Dougan drums and Keshav Sathe tabla.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    It was perhaps no surprise that shortly after the release of ‘Integration...’, D’Silva joined forces with alto saxophonist Joe Harriott, who had previously worked with Indian violinist John Mayer. This is the title track from that 1969 Harriott/D’Silva Quartet album ‘Hum-Dono’, with Dave Green back on bass and Bryan Spring on the drums.

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  • gjw100
    replied
    Indian-born guitarist Amancio D’Silva moved to London for family reasons in 1967 at the age of 31, but within just a couple of years his playing had attracted enough attention to secure a recording session with Ian Carr and Don Rendell, two of the most prominent British jazz musicians of that period. This is ‘Jaipur’ from that 1969 debut album ‘Integration...Introducing Amancio D’Silva’, with Carr on trumpet, Rendell tenor saxophone, Dave Green bass and Trevor Tomkins drums.

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  • ad hoc
    replied
    Not Aarset, just the other two. Which is presumably why they were billed as Dhafer Youssef Trio, which I've not found reference to elsewhere on the Internet.

    This adds to Nef's point about the international nature of things - Dos Santos is Brazilian and Cassarano Italian

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  • gjw100
    replied
    I wasn't sure how familiar you might have been with Dhafer Youssef beforehand ad hoc, but I did know that you would be in for a treat. I think his voice has a range and purity that's unmatched in any genre, not just jazz. I assume that he was playing with what appears to be his band for this year's Summer festival circuit - Eivind Aarset, Rafaele Cassarano and Adriano Dos Santos. I've seen a clip of them playing just a couple of weeks ago (also in Romania) and they were mighty impressive.

    Have to agree Nefertiti2!!!

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