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Words only used in one song?

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Thanks for the explanations. The song was "I Predict a Riot" ursus arctos

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  • jwdd27
    replied
    Smeaton was, as the song notes, an Old Leodensian, i.e. an ex-Leeds Grammar School boy (like Ricky Wilson).
    Smeaton also has a state school named after him in the city, which is what most Leeds people would think you were referring to if you said "Smeaton".

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Dunno the song, but John Smeaton is often called the father of civil engineering

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Got one - the Kaiser Chiefs had a weird reference to "Smeaton" which I thought was a name from Dickens but now am not so sure.

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  • irony towers
    replied
    A couple that came up on the same radio show today:

    "conventionality" - Grease by Frankie Valli (though it also appears in half a dozen obscure songs)

    "mahout" - Drop the Pilot by Joan Armatrading; no other mentions that I can find.

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  • irony towers
    replied
    Alexei Sayle was on Desert Island Discs last week and chose Shipbuilding, which is a one-off if you disregard its inclusion in some music-hall whimsy from Stanley Holloway.

    Upthread Fussbudget mentioned the propensity towards "precious and literary" lyrics in Orange Juice songs. I'll nominate Edwyn Collins' A Girl Like You for "allegorically," which otherwise appears only in a handful of (I think) obscure tracks.

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  • Jon
    replied
    Similarly, South Detroit:

    "While the lyrics mention being "born and raised in south Detroit", there is no place in the Detroit, Michigan area called "South Detroit"; the location south of the Detroit city center is actually the Canadian city of Windsor.[8] Steve Perry has said, "I tried north Detroit, I tried east and west and it didn't sing, but south Detroit sounded so beautiful. I loved the way it sounded, only to find out later it's actually Canada."[8] Detroiters often refer to the "East Side" and "West Side" of the city, but only rarely north (sometimes called "8 Mile", after the road of the same name) or south (referred to as "Downriver" or "Mexican Town"). The lyric "streetlight people living just to find emotion" came from Perry watching people walking in the streets of Detroit at night after a show.[9]"

    From Journey's 'Don't Stop Believing.' Or, as I prefer to sing it: "Don't start un-believing, Never don't not feel your feelings."



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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Wiki seems to think that East(ern) California is basically anything that's in the rain shadow of the Sierras, Cascades and Peninsular Ranges, or maybe places where your main route north-south is going to be the 395 rather than the 99 or 5 or 101.

    I think defining it by roads would be a very California thing.

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Article on the vagueness of where Northern and Southern California actually are

    https://www.mynspr.org/post/where-ex...ornia#stream/0

    Palm and Pine tree planted to possibly define the center-line between Northern and Southern California, just south of Madera on CA-99

    https://duanehallca.blogspot.com/201...eets-pine.html

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Similarly, "Central California" is defined in terms of east-west, while Northern and Southern California use north-south (with vast swathes of the northernmost part of the state being largely ignored).

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  • danielmak
    replied
    Originally posted by Walt Flanagans Dog View Post
    Glad you caught that as well. West coast is certainly used in California, but as you note, there is no sense of what East California means. Even San Bernadino isn't that far east, although it is certainly east of Los Angeles.

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  • My Name Is Ian
    replied
    I thought Fountains of Wayne would be good for this. I had to do a tiny bit of digging, but New Routine, off their otherwise broadly disappointing album Traffic & Weather, contains the plural "prostates." Apparently, people don't otherwise like singing about more than one.

    (This song also contains a rare mention of "Liechtenstein", which makes up the second half of my favourite lyrical rhyme of all time, in no small part because it's *so* unexpected the first time you hear it, although it's some way off unique.)

    And so far as I can see, they've also committed the only lyrical reference to Basil Hayden's bourbon on record, on the song Red Dragon Tattoo.

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by danielmak View Post
    I posted about this in relation to re: an earworm. I'm a big fan of Kim Wilde's Kids in America (and maybe like the Muffs' cover even better) but there is a bizarre phrase, so not a word, that nobody would use in California:

    New York to east California

    Also, I don't know if the phrase music-go-round has been used elsewhere. That's a clever phrase.

    Here's the song since I know y'all are itching to hear it now:
    https://www.onetouchfootball.com/for...ck#post2352958

    Leave a comment:


  • danielmak
    replied
    I posted about this in relation to re: an earworm. I'm a big fan of Kim Wilde's Kids in America (and maybe like the Muffs' cover even better) but there is a bizarre phrase, so not a word, that nobody would use in California:

    New York to east California

    Also, I don't know if the phrase music-go-round has been used elsewhere. That's a clever phrase.

    Here's the song since I know y'all are itching to hear it now:

    Leave a comment:


  • nmrfox
    replied
    Wobbegong (aka a carpet shark) appears in just one song, Luritja Way by (not surprisingly) Midnight Oil.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    A 'kipper' is a smoked herring - a popular breakfast dish in the UK, particularly in Scotland and the north.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kipper

    Why the heck Supertramp thought them likely to be found in Texas, God alone knows.

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  • KyleRoteJr.
    replied
    Dang, I thought it had only been used by Supertramp, whatever kippers are
    Last edited by KyleRoteJr.; 30-09-2020, 12:06.

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  • Sits
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Cogito View Post

    It's in a Jam song - Saturdays Kids
    And Bracklesham Bay

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Breakfast in America - Supertramp
    Angel Delight - Fairport Convention
    Seafood Song - Divine Comedy
    Boy What Love Has Done for Me! - Ella Fitzgerald
    Full English Brexit - Billy Bragg

    ...all mention 'kippers'. (And songs by Ian Dury, Belle & Sebastian and Mark Knopfler talk of 'kipper' in the singular.)

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  • KyleRoteJr.
    replied
    kippers

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  • Tony C
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    The 'Trick of the Tail' artwork is very recognisible.

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  • Jimski
    replied
    I thought Arab Strap would be good for this, but all I could find was the reference to "Merrydown" cider in "The First Big Weekend", confirmed as being the only such reference in lyrics.

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  • statto99
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    The Tragically Hip did a song called Titanic Terrarium. How many times does the word Terrarium feature in a song?
    10, apparently:

    https://www.lyrics.com/lyrics/terrarium

    Given that a two word search phrase that returns only one page is termed a Googlewhack, if a word appears in only one song could it be a Lyricwhack?

    Leave a comment:


  • johnr
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    When I started the thread - and being probably their biggest fan on OTF - I was going to mention that, as well as the words naiad, hogweed, slubberdegullions, breadbin, and quite a few others but, as per the OP, didn't feel that would qualify as sufficiently 'popular'.

    (BTW, is that a 7in single cover Ursus? That song is far too unwieldy to be a hit, what were they thinking?)

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    The Tragically Hip did a song called Titanic Terrarium. How many times does the word Terrarium feature in a song?

    Leave a comment:

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