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Football stadiums not under cover

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  • RobM
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    That's appalling, have to say though that it's not really a fair reflection (at least from a Scottish perspective).

    Been to a number of games since my stroke away from non-league games and the experience has been good. Somerset Park at Ayr, Tynecastle and Cove (Highland League) have all been fantastic with decent facilities and stewards were hugely helpful and approachable. Getting to games has been an entirely positive thing for me, Ayr and Cove aren't state of the art but they ensured comfort and the people there made sure you knew where to ask for help.

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  • Bordeaux Education
    replied
    Originally posted by elguapo4 View Post
    Croke Park in Dublin is state of the art 82000 capacity stadium but about 30,000 of those get pissed on when it rains,the iconic Hill 16 is uncovered as are the first 30 rows of seats in the stands,of course Gaelic games are mostly summer sports so it's not really designed for northern European winters
    I remember going there for the Wales game and thinking that it was remarkably open to the elements. As it was, it was a remarkably unseasonally balmy March day when we were there. However, I do feel that not having a roof on, due to it being mostly used in Ireland's summer, is a triumph of hope over logic.

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  • elguapo4
    replied
    Croke Park in Dublin is state of the art 82000 capacity stadium but about 30,000 of those get pissed on when it rains,the iconic Hill 16 is uncovered as are the first 30 rows of seats in the stands,of course Gaelic games are mostly summer sports so it's not really designed for northern European winters

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    The Qataris have largely abandoned that wheeze, haven't they?

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Tell this to the world cup organisers in Qatar.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    They are domed so that they can be air conditioned.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Quite a few NFL stadiums seem to lack much in the way of cover to protect the fans: I'm by no means an expert but the Green Bay Packers stadium seems pretty open, as do many as those in the northern states. Does this mean that American football fans in the southern states, where many arenas are domed, are wussies?
    Last edited by Sporting; 20-10-2018, 09:36.

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  • jameswba
    replied
    Does Molineux still have its Gene Kelly Stand - the little bank of temporary uncovered seats in the one corner? Recent pics suggest it's still there, but unused.

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  • Pérou Flaquettes
    replied
    A few Ligue 1 stadiums are still partially uncovered: Montpellier’s La Mosson, Monaco’s Stade Louis II, the Costières at Nîmes, the Corsican clubs’ stadiums (when in Ligue 1, Bastia and the 2 Ajaccio clubs – although just the tiny South stand remains unroofed in AC Ajaccio AC’s François Coty stadium) and maybe 1 or 2 others.

    La Mosson’s big South stand and the Méditerranée corner stand (15,000 seats) were supposed to get a roof by 2017 but the project was cancelled when plans for a new stadium emerged (Stade Louis Nicollin – of course – completion expected for 2022), I think the South stand is now permanently closed (the stadium’s far too big anyway for their gates averaging only about 12,000).

    Angers' Raymond Kopa Stadium (formerly Jean-Bouin, too many Jean-Bouins in France so they renamed it when their old boy Raymond died in 2017) only got fully covered last February with the rebuild and extension of the Colombier stand (fans not happy though when tickets went up 40% in the new stand to cover costs, about €5 million, I remember them protesting on the radio).

    Bordeaux’s old Stade Municipal/Chaban-Delmas had plenty of areas unprotected by the small roof around it (replaced by the Matmut Atlantique in 2015). Stade du Ray in Nice was gloriously roofless on three sides, got soaked there once (closed in 2013). Marseilles’ Vélodrome only got a roof 4 years ago for the Euros 2016.

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  • Bordeaux Education
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post
    The City of Manchester Stadium is particularly bad for that, I think (possibly due to it’s original design as an athletics stadium?). They have to give out thousands of sky blue plastic ponchos out to supporters in the lower tiers when it rains and, it being Manchester, that is a common occurrrence.

    Cardiff’s Stade de Farce seems to be the same.
    I thought you were going to hark back to the Cardiff away game at Craven Cottage when the away terrace wasn't covered and it pissed down all evening which led to me getting flu*

    I am not sure that the front of any stand is truly covered. I remember a game where I sat at the front of the 'covered' part of the Bob Bank at Ninian Park and found out the difference between 'waterproof' and 'showerproof' in my new showerproof coat. The other problem is that there is always a part of every stand where there is a leak that lets a torrent of rain though. You would rather be out in anything up to torrential rain than sit under that.

    *I know that you can't 'get' flu from being saturated by rain but facts are meaningless. You can use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true. Facts schmacts.

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  • NHH
    replied
    Carlisle’s old uncovered away end is the place I have been coldest in my life. Assailed by wind and rain. Truly horrendous.

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  • JVL
    replied
    Karlsruher SC are in the 3. Liga now but the Wildparkstadion hosted top-flight football just a few years ago. Virtually every part of the ground is exposed to the elements in some way, there isn't much cover, and you're a long way from the action. I've seen matches from most sections in the stadium and have a bit of a soft spot for it, for no readily-discernible reason. Looks like its days are finally numbered though, I think the plans to knock it down that have been changed, abandoned and adjusted many times over the last 20 years are now complete and work to build a football-only 'arena' is due to start soon...

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    George, it keeps getting green lights, only to be followed by red ones.

    The current fear is that it will fall victim to the perhaps imminent collapse of the M5S government currently running the city.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Janik, the Torre di Maratona was built in 1929 as a Fascist era monumental addition to what was then called the Stadio Littorale.



    It originally featured a statue of Victory with the fasces and an equestrian statue of Mussolini, but has now been converted into the "Sky Lounge Bar"

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  • George
    replied
    I thought Roma's new stadium had been given the green light by the local authorities, along with a much larger adjacent business park?

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    "Occasionally" gives the impression that it happens more often than it does.

    In Bologna's case, as is common, the "plans" are associated with new ownership.

    In reality, most renovations are connected to a major tournament. Italy is still suffering from not having gotten the 2012 Euros because of Calciopoli. It had been considered a done deal, and the municipalities who own the grounds were all counting on an influx of state and EU funds to allow them to bring grounds up to date (as very little has been done to the vast majority of them since Italia '90). There was no Plan B and still isn't. At the same time, plans like Roma's for entirely new grounds have suffered from the usual bureaucratic gridlock.

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  • George
    replied
    There is always ''plans'' to carry out work on stadiums in Italy. Occasionally it takes place.

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  • Janik
    replied
    Seeing as the picture of Bologna's stadium has come up, what is the story behind that castle tower thingy?

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Ah, crap. I knew it looked different than I remembered it from the time when you had a better chance sheltering under the trees on the walk there than in the ground



    The dell 'Ara is still uncovered, though there are plans to put a roof on



    As is the Franchi in Firenze, where I have personally been drenched more than once

    Last edited by ursus arctos; 19-10-2018, 12:59.

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  • treibeis
    replied
    Hideous, filthy, frightening:
    Last edited by treibeis; 19-10-2018, 14:08.

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  • treibeis
    replied
    Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
    HSV’s Volksparkstadion

    You're doing the second-division lads a favour there. That picture's of the new ground before they put the roof on. The old Volksparkstadion - a hideous, filthy, frightening place - was so uncovered at both ends that you might as well have been standing on the beach on Amrum.
    Last edited by treibeis; 19-10-2018, 12:46.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    Here’s the tweet that WFD referenced

    https://twitter.com/bbc5live/status/1052852062713733120?s=21

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    1. Bundesliga grounds tend to be covered now, but that was certainly not the case when I first started watching German football. In many cases the current crowd cover was the result of renovations for the 2006 World Cup.

    Schalke’s Parkstadion



    HSV’s Volksparkstadion



    Eintracht Frankfurt’s Waldstadion

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  • HORN
    replied
    I can testify that the first few rows of the Craven Cottage stand that holds away supporters’ were certainly uncovered in August.

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Last Saturday's Carlisle v Morecambe match was played in an absolute downpour during 'Storm Callum'.

    Morecambe had one supporter in a wheelchair, with accompanying parent, and Carlisle put them in the away-disabled area - an uncovered, pitch level, area at the corner of the pitch. The pair got absolutely soaked and it appears Morecambe fans tried to persuade our stewards to bring them into the away end, under cover, but the stewards (apparently) refused on safety grounds. They did apparently offer them the option of going into the home-disabled section which is under cover of sorts, being (I shit you not) two joined-together former Newcastle United dugouts which we got for nowt when Newcastle got new ones, with the intention of using them as dugouts but realised they were too tall. Anyway the Morecambe fans didn't really fancy this idea, understandably.

    Photos of said pair made it onto our message board, and some of our fans have taken up the cause, sending them to the FL, supporters groups and the media, and Five Live have picked up on it (they tweeted it yesterday - can't link from here) - with the intent of shaming our own club into doing something better, which it appears may be materialising.

    So yeah, fair to say we haven't got 100% coverage at our place, in the wettest county in the country.

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