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Salford (Disgustingly Rich) Lads' Club - Conference National 2018/19

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  • Guy Profumo
    replied
    Originally posted by elguapo4 View Post
    The only time I heard of Chertsey was as one of the towns destroyed by the Martians in The War Of The Worlds.
    The chances of that happening are a million to one they say...

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  • Nesta
    replied
    Double in Italian

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  • TonTon
    replied
    What is a Doppi-O please?

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  • TonTon
    replied
    Boncho played for Chertsey manager Dave Anderson at Hendon.

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  • David Agnew
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post
    The BBC match report has confirmed my suspicion from earlier in the season that Chertsey's Lubo Guentchev is indeed the son of Bontcho.
    He'll be in his early thirties now.

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  • elguapo4
    replied
    The only time I heard of Chertsey was as one of the towns destroyed by the Martians in The War Of The Worlds.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    The BBC match report has confirmed my suspicion from earlier in the season that Chertsey's Lubo Guentchev is indeed the son of Bontcho.

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  • Nesta
    replied
    Ooh, very Walter Scott isn't it? In Scotland they'd go the whole hog and call the club Blanche Heriot or Curfew Bell Thistle or something.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    The famous Chertsey curfew bell.

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  • Nesta
    replied
    The Ankle Tags. The Asbos

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  • Nesta
    replied
    The Curfews?? Are they not allowed to use their floodlights or something?

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Absolute cracker from Chertsey centre half Quincy Rowe to seal the Vase for The Curfews, 3-1 in the last few minutes of extra time.
    Last edited by Ray de Galles; 19-05-2019, 13:51.

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  • Nesta
    replied
    Good luck to Orient looking to complete the Doppi-O this afternoon.

    Chertsey and Cray Valley at 1-1 in the Vase, extra time being played

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  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    Yeah, that was for all three Vanarama divisions. I got a cheap ticket for the final that was eventually Bristol Rovers v Grimsby Town through Wealdstone. A number of other Wealdstone folk also bought tickets but ended up going to watch Hendon fail to get promoted on the same day...

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  • Simon G
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post

    What kind of "neutral" would turn up for a game like that? I'm an inveterate attender of random games and love rubbernecking at play-offs but that game wouldn't have any appeal for me even without the problems I have with both clubs, especially at Wembley.

    As someone said above, my guess is that the figure includes thousands of comps issued and the take up rate on such tickets is usually around 30% at the absolute best. I'd be surprised if there was much above 5,000 actually in the stadium.
    I might have this wrong, but when we were in the Conference a couple of years back, they did a special deal for the playoff final of £20 for a ticket from about February time - that way if your team got there you had the ticket already. I'm sure they still do it. Once the season finished, the ticket promotion ended and the prices went up to the £41 or whatever it was per ticket on Sunday.

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  • Amor de Cosmos
    replied
    Originally posted by Jimski View Post
    Oxford City were indeed once the bigger side in Oxford. But they fell behind Headington United (who became Oxford United) when they decided not to turn professional, staying in the Isthmian League. Headington United turned professional in 1949, joined the Southern League, and pretty soon became one of the top sides in it.
    Yes, and though Cambridge City had a brief period of cash injected success in the early 60s, it didn't take, and by the end of the decade were superseded by their local rivals.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Originally posted by Jobi1 View Post

    Anecdotally, about half that number were 'neutrals', with 1,000 from Fylde and 3,000 from Salford (the majority of whom you'd imagine were just there in the hope of a selfie with a Neville brother).
    What kind of "neutral" would turn up for a game like that? I'm an inveterate attender of random games and love rubbernecking at play-offs but that game wouldn't have any appeal for me even without the problems I have with both clubs, especially at Wembley.

    As someone said above, my guess is that the figure includes thousands of comps issued and the take up rate on such tickets is usually around 30% at the absolute best. I'd be surprised if there was much above 5,000 actually in the stadium.

    Leave a comment:


  • E10 Rifle
    replied
    I gather Fylde have sold quite a few more tickets for this weekend's match than for last weekend's, what with them knowing they were going to be in it seven weeks ago and the prices being much cheaper.

    I still wanted Fylde to win the promotion play-off, on footballing grounds partly (they a more easy on the eye passing game than Salford) and for the reasons Ray de Galles cites, that Salford's win turns next year's League Two into a class of 92 theme park. Still, Salford's a decent away trip

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  • Jobi1
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    8,000 attendance seems pretty low. Other clubs might not have sizeable crowds, but for a Wembley day out the day-trippers usually turn out from the town/region. Even Torquay would attract more.
    Anecdotally, about half that number were 'neutrals', with 1,000 from Fylde and 3,000 from Salford (the majority of whom you'd imagine were just there in the hope of a selfie with a Neville brother).

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  • Jimski
    replied
    Oxford City were indeed once the bigger side in Oxford. But they fell behind Headington United (who became Oxford United) when they decided not to turn professional, staying in the Isthmian League. Headington United turned professional in 1949, joined the Southern League, and pretty soon became one of the top sides in it.
    Last edited by Jimski; 14-05-2019, 05:32.

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  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
    Barnet and Wycombe (not sure about Yeovil and Cheltenham) were "amateur" clubs back then. There was little incentive for them to turn pro. The attendances of many were comparable with third division teams, and their expenses far less (mainly because of undeclared non-cash arrangements, not to mention "boot" money.) That ended when amateurism disappeared. Yeovil was always a "big" Southern League team, so it was expected they'd move up reasonably quickly, same with Oxford and Cambridge Uniteds. Barnet and Wycombe probably benefited from the post-War population growth in the South East and had the wherewithal to rise at that time too.
    Weren't the City teams bigger than the United teams?

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  • Simon G
    replied
    Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post

    Barnet and Wycombe (not sure about Yeovil and Cheltenham) were "amateur" clubs back then. There was little incentive for them to turn pro. The attendances of many were comparable with third division teams, and their expenses far less (mainly because of undeclared non-cash arrangements, not to mention "boot" money.) That ended when amateurism disappeared. Yeovil was always a "big" Southern League team, so it was expected they'd move up reasonably quickly, same with Oxford and Cambridge Uniteds. Barnet and Wycombe probably benefited from the post-War population growth in the South East and had the wherewithal to rise at that time too.
    We didn't join the Southern League until 1935 so would also have been amateur at the time. In fact, a quick check shows the playing side didn't become "professional" until 1932.

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  • slackster
    replied
    Wasnít bothered who won this battle of the vanity projects. Canít see too many of the crushed grouplet of Fylde fans electing to schlep down next weekend from the north west for the consolation Trophy final. But there will be a decent crowd because Orient have sold plenty of tickets, and the south-east based Vase teams (both promoted from step 5) will shift quite a few thousand too for an easy journey to a celebratory day out.

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  • Amor de Cosmos
    replied
    Originally posted by NHH View Post
    The thing to remember with relegation was that the expansion of the football league in 1921 was to try and counter Rugby League; the Southern League had been integrated the year before as Division Three, then the upper echelons of the regional Northern and Midland leagues were creamed off to make Division Three North. As a result, the upper eschelons of the Northern and Midland non-leagues were weaker than the equivalent southern leagues. I wonder if that's why some of the teams who came up in the post 87 relegation/promotion without being backed by silly money have been disproportionately southern teams (Wycombe, Yeovil until now, Cheltenham, Barnet) as they were clubs that were missed out back in 1921.
    Barnet and Wycombe (not sure about Yeovil and Cheltenham) were "amateur" clubs back then. There was little incentive for them to turn pro. The attendances of many were comparable with third division teams, and their expenses far less (mainly because of undeclared non-cash arrangements, not to mention "boot" money.) That ended when amateurism disappeared. Yeovil was always a "big" Southern League team, so it was expected they'd move up reasonably quickly, same with Oxford and Cambridge Uniteds. Barnet and Wycombe probably benefited from the post-War population growth in the South East and had the wherewithal to rise at that time too.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Agnew
    replied
    Originally posted by TonTon View Post
    Didn't you get relegated this season?
    We did, but it was a bit devoid of excitement, given that we were ten points adrift of safety on New Year's Day, and the most we reduced the gap to, was nine,

    Leave a comment:

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