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  • Bordeaux Education
    replied
    As I have just checked this out, I want to tell you that Queen's Park won many Scottish Cups at Hampden but the last one was in the 1890s

    Originally posted by 3 Colours Red View Post
    Eighteen of our Welsh Cups were won outright at the Racecourse and another one was a two-legged affair with the first at home. Makes our record tally in the competition slightly easier to comprehend.
    Indeed, outside of Wrexham's home successes, the Welsh cup finals are surprisingly unparochial. In the one-legged final eras of the competition, Cardiff only won the Welsh Cup twice at Ninian Park and twice at the Arms Park. Swansea only won the Welsh Cup twice at the Vetch and Llanelli have won it once at Parc Y Scarlets. Indeed, Chester and Shrewsbury have done pretty much as well as those three winning at home with 2 wins and 1 respectively and those were, of course, not even in Wales.

    As far as Bath City are concerned, even though we haven't won it for 10 years, we are record holders of the Somerset Cup but no surprise as Twerton Park is invariably the final venue. However, slightly differently, we won our Conference South play-off in 2010 at Twerton Park as well.



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  • Southport Zeb
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    Common enough in other sports of course (Middlesex cricket, Auckland rugby, Aussie rules, etc). Which leads on to ...



    So are there many examples of a stadium with no "anchor tenant" at all, even from another sport (which the old Wembley had, after a fashion).
    Estadio Nacional in Lisbon has not had an anchor tenant until this season when Belenenses moved in. It has hosted the Portuguese Cup final on all bar five occasions since 1946 and most famously the 1967 European Cup final.

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  • Janik
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    The frequency of this happening would be increased in countries that don't have a national stadium. Cup finals are going to tend to be in the biggest grounds and teams from the biggest grounds are likely to be the biggest clubs who reach cup finals more often.
    This.

    The Czech Rep lacks such a beast, though Strahov has been something like it. That hosted the Czech Cup Final every year for over a decade after the breakup of Czechoslovakia, but from 2000 Slavia played their home matches there whilst Eden was derelict/being redeveloped. That took most of a decade, and Slavia won the Cup once at 'home' in that period, though as with Spurs whilst it was the stadium where they played their home league games, it wasn't their real home. The final began to move around soon after though, not because Slavia had got back to the final but because two Moravian sides had (Banik Ostrava and Slovacko) so a Movarian ground was more sensible. A geographically appropriate neutral ground has been found pretty well every time since then.

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan
    replied
    Very few sides seem to have lost home legs, really, back in the days of the old UEFA Cup when it was a two-legged affair. Certainly far fewer than the rough 25% you'd expect from games between two evenly matched teams. Liverpool and Ipswich both won a UEFA Cup by trouncing their opponents at home then getting a drubbing away while hanging on on aggregate. One outlier to that was Real Madrid going to Szekesferharvar in 1985 to stuff Videoton 3-0, then losing 1-0 at the Bernabeu in the second leg, during which I doubt they were ever seriously in fear of losing the trophy.

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    Common enough in other sports of course (Middlesex cricket, Auckland rugby, Aussie rules, etc).
    Australian RL as well, with Souths/Canterbury having ANZ as their home stadium, and other Sydney clubs regularly playing home and away games there.

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  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Sporting View Post
    Why not? The more obscure, the better.
    Carlisle United usually host the Cumberland Cup final, and usually make it to the final. I've been to 2-3 of them, my son was ballboy at one.

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  • Alderman Barnes
    replied
    Originally posted by Stumpy Pepys View Post
    I assumed Hertha BSC must have reached at least one cup final since the DFB Pokal moved permanently to the Olympiastadion, but apparently not.

    Although, and this was something I didn't know, their reserve team got to the final in 1993. They lost.

    And after yesterday's result, they're not going to do it this year either.
    Technically, though, it wasn't a home match for the reserves. They played at Osloer Straße.

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  • seand
    replied
    Certainly not uncommon in smaller countries.... Ireland, NI, Malta, Estonia etc, etc. In Ireland the League Cup final was 2 legs, when it went to one leg there was talk of a neutral venue but it was basically agreed that it was better to toss a coin for home advantage and have a bigger crowd at one of the finalists' grounds.

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    Mind you, they're about 200 miles apart, so there's a logic in it at least.

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    What's the deal with Poland? Two national team football stadiums?

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    Oh, I see - the Sochi side is a relocated franchise kind of deal, having killed off and moved Dynamo St Petersburg...
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FC_Dyn...int_Petersburg

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    Oh, hang on, a new Sochi side has appeared to play in the Fisht. They're in the second tier.

    But I think the Luzhniki is currently unoccupied, though whether the Russian Cup Finals it has staged were at a point when it was unoccupied or with a Moscow club playing there, I don't know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russia...otball)#Finals

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  • Kevin S
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    Common enough in other sports of course (Middlesex cricket, Auckland rugby, Aussie rules, etc). Which leads on to ...

    So are there many examples of a stadium with no "anchor tenant" at all, even from another sport (which the old Wembley had, after a fashion).
    Russia has a few, I think.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    Common enough in other sports of course (Middlesex cricket, Auckland rugby, Aussie rules, etc). Which leads on to ...



    So are there many examples of a stadium with no "anchor tenant" at all, even from another sport (which the old Wembley had, after a fashion).
    La Cartuja in Sevilla.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Originally posted by ale View Post
    Should never be allowed to be happen if can be avoided. Which excuses naming a European final venue 12 months or more before knowing the finalists. Much more difficult to forgive English football allowing Spurs to play historically neutral cup games on home ground.
    The sensible thing to do would've been to maintain neutral grounds for FA Cup semi-finals, then people wouldn't start getting bees in their bonnets about a team playing a 'home' match at what is effectively a neutral ground anyway.

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  • Aitch
    replied
    The Dutch cup is always played at Feyenoord's De Kuyp stadium. And if Feyenoord make it to the final, they are always the "home" team.

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  • Stumpy Pepys
    replied
    I assumed Hertha BSC must have reached at least one cup final since the DFB Pokal moved permanently to the Olympiastadion, but apparently not.

    Although, and this was something I didn't know, their reserve team got to the final in 1993. They lost.

    And after yesterday's result, they're not going to do it this year either.

    Leave a comment:


  • tee rex
    replied
    Common enough in other sports of course (Middlesex cricket, Auckland rugby, Aussie rules, etc). Which leads on to ...

    The frequency of this happening would be increased in countries that don't have a national stadium. Cup finals are going to tend to be in the biggest grounds and teams from the biggest grounds are likely to be the biggest clubs who reach cup finals more often.
    So are there many examples of a stadium with no "anchor tenant" at all, even from another sport (which the old Wembley had, after a fashion).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sporting
    replied
    And to be fair - they've done surveys on this, they have - it never has been. Man Utd since whenever have had a broad geographical fan base without losng (ok maybe recently) the core Manchester support.

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    ISWYDT

    (Although not sure London was 'South Manchester' back in 68)

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    Cardiff City won a play off final at the Millennium Stadium. Not exactly home advantage but close enough.
    Nah, cos otherwise we could include Man Utd winning in 68 at Wembley ha ha!

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Cardiff City won a play off final at the Millennium Stadium. Not exactly home advantage but close enough.

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    The frequency of this happening would be increased in countries that don't have a national stadium. Cup finals are going to tend to be in the biggest grounds and teams from the biggest grounds are likely to be the biggest clubs who reach cup finals more often.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Colours Red
    replied
    Eighteen of our Welsh Cups were won outright at the Racecourse and another one was a two-legged affair with the first at home. Makes our record tally in the competition slightly easier to comprehend.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    In the German cup Karlsruher won the competition in 1956 playing at home and in 1983 Köln beat Fortuna Köln in, well, guess where?

    On edit: the 1956 DFB-Pokal tournament featured five clubs; Karlsruher, Spandauer, Pirmasens, Fortuna Düsseldorf and Hamburg. The previous season 32 teams had participated but over the next few seasons only five or sometimes even four were in the tournament. So what was going on here, then?
    Last edited by Sporting; 08-02-2019, 06:50. Reason: More amazingly obscure information came to light (to my light at least)

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