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Tactics: throw-ins

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    Patrick Thistle

  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    I saw a ref whistle for a foul throw today and award the throw in to the other team.

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  • N est à?
    replied
    Feel like we need to talk about the Iranian guy who tried to do a somersault throw-in at the world cup

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  • Patrick Thistle

  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Originally posted by EIM View Post
    He's thrown a kettle over a pub. What have you done?
    See, that just seems dangerous to me. How would you know there was clear space behind the pub and no one was walking past? Unless he had a spotter giving him the thumbs up that's just a devil-may-care attitude to health and safety, and yet another reason to hate Liverpool.

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  • Felicity, I guess so

  • Felicity, I guess so
    replied
    The throw from above rather than behind the head used to get Eddie Corbett’s dad going when I was playing for St. Sylvester’s school team. “Foul shy, ref! Foul shy!”

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  • Stobart
    replied
    Originally posted by G-Man View Post
    Both feet must be on the ground at the point when the ball is being released.
    And your feet must both be behind the line.

    But it's the law regarding the actual throwing action that our refs interpreted differently from those in Serie A, La Liga etc. Until recently ours were consistently giving foul throws for (to me) nothing more than throwing it a very short distance. I could understand it if the ball hadn't gone behind the players head (ie some players just throw it from level with their forehead) but in most instances that wasn't the case.


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  • G-Man
    replied
    Both feet must be on the ground at the point when the ball is being released.

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  • Stobart
    replied
    Originally posted by G-Man View Post
    I would like players to first learn how to take a proper throw-in. My coach when I was 8 would be turning in his grave, if he is dead, at seeing what liberties these zillionaires take with the throw-in rules. And at the refs who almost always let it slide
    What is a 'proper throw-in' ? Until recently our ref's differed from those abroad by regularly awarding a foul throw even although the ball was thrown " whilst facing the field of play with both hands from behind and over the head ". In particular the refs (and, as you say, coaches) disliked the ball being thrown directly onto the ground over a short distance. Why ? It still meets the requirements.

    Recently we've fallen in line with everyone else, although it still prevails at amateur level.

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  • EIM
    replied
    He's thrown a kettle over a pub. What have you done?

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan

  • Rogin the Armchair fan
    replied
    He's not - He's called Thomas Gronnemark, and he holds the world long throw record at 56m.

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  • ursus arctos
    replied
    On the contrary.

    But you aren't alone.

    Andy Gray thought it was funny, too.

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  • treibeis
    replied
    Originally posted by Sporting View Post
    Liverpool have a dedicated throw-in coach
    You're pulling our collective pisser here, aren't you?

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  • jameswba
    replied
    Originally posted by wittoner View Post
    Yes. Goal kicks once had to be taken from the "correct" side.. The rule was changed because keepers were deliberately placing the ball on the wrong side in order to waste time as the referee was obliged to make them move the ball which inevitably became a major undertaking in the final stages of a game.
    This kind of timewasting doesn't only go on in the closing stages of a game. Ben Foster (then at WBA) is on record as having done what Ray mentions after 8 minutes of a game at Everton two seasons ago. The Bolton 'keeper was at it at a similar stage of this season's game at the Hawthorns. But do we ever see a referee book a timewasting goalkeeper at any point of a game before injury-time? We don't, but we very often see a referee sprinting 50 yards to show a yellow card 4 minutes into injury-time, by which time the game has long been ruined.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Whereas now they waste time by slowly going to the opposite side from where the ball went out. I'd prefer it if they brought the old rule back and just immediately booked time-wasting offenders.

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  • wittoner
    replied
    Yes. Goal kicks once had to be taken from the "correct" side.. The rule was changed because keepers were deliberately placing the ball on the wrong side in order to waste time as the referee was obliged to make them move the ball which inevitably became a major undertaking in the final stages of a game.

    Leave a comment:


  • Simon G
    replied
    Originally posted by Sporting View Post
    Players don't need to learn how to throw in because the referees don't blow up for gaining distance and foul throws in general, save the most blatant examples. It reminds me of how corners are practically never taken from where they should be, but slightly out of the arc. I'd be interested to hear from Imp on this.

    Anyway...Liverpool have a dedicated throw-in coach, don't they? So they should be among the best around.
    Following on from this - what's the rule on goalkicks - have they ever had to be taken from the side of the goal they went out on? This is something my uncle and I discuss at nearly every game we attend.

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  • Patrick Thistle

  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Generally players can't throw a ball as far or hard as they can kick it. But it is an anomaly that is rarely exploited.

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  • seand
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post

    The failure of players to exploit the lack of offside at throw ins is one of my constant complaints and I’d go further than you any throw in within a team’s attacking third should be used as a chance to stretch the play and force the opposition defence deeper than they’d want to go.
    I'd love to know the rationale behind this anomaly. Why can you not be offside from a throw, but you can be from a free taken from a yard away? I can't see the logic behind it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Originally posted by Rogin the Armchair fan View Post
    Most teams seem to forget the bit about you can't be offside from a throw in. Any attacking throw in within ten yards of a corner flag should be going towards the head of a tall bloke positioned on or just outside the near post on the goal line for him to nod back into the area (or should threaten to). If nothing else it would pull the defense's formation right out of whack.
    The failure of players to exploit the lack of offside at throw ins is one of my constant complaints and I’d go further than you - any throw in within a team’s attacking third should be used as a chance to stretch the play and force the opposition defence deeper than they’d want to go.
    Last edited by Ray de Galles; 16-01-2019, 13:58.

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  • seand
    replied
    Originally posted by Sporting View Post
    Players don't need to learn how to throw in because the referees don't blow up for gaining distance and foul throws in general, save the most blatant examples. It reminds me of how corners are practically never taken from where they should be, but slightly out of the arc. I'd be interested to hear from Imp on this.

    Anyway...Liverpool have a dedicated throw-in coach, don't they? So they should be among the best around.
    Just on corners, only a fraction of the ball needs to be 'in' the quadrant, so the ball doesn't need to be touching the painted line as long as a bit of it is hovering over the line (in the same way that a ball that has 99% crossed the goal line is not a goal). This seems to be the default set up these days, understandably as it gives the taker and extra couple of inches distance from the corner flag. For a long time it was a pet annoyance of mine that players slavishly placed the ball on the white line for corners instead of taking those few inches.

    Back in the olden days, and we're talking 19th century here, the throw in had to be tken by the team putting the ball out as it was considered they were at a disadvantage by having a player off the pitch.

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  • Rogin the Armchair fan

  • Rogin the Armchair fan
    replied
    Most teams seem to forget the bit about you can't be offside from a throw in. Any attacking throw in within ten yards of a corner flag should be going towards the head of a tall bloke positioned on or just outside the near post on the goal line for him to nod back into the area (or should threaten to). If nothing else it would pull the defense's formation right out of whack.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Colours Red
    replied
    A 20% success rate from throw-ins actually seems pretty high to me. A fair chunk of modern tactical and technical coaching focuses on marginal gains - this is no different.

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  • Sporting
    replied
    Players don't need to learn how to throw in because the referees don't blow up for gaining distance and foul throws in general, save the most blatant examples. It reminds me of how corners are practically never taken from where they should be, but slightly out of the arc. I'd be interested to hear from Imp on this.

    Anyway...Liverpool have a dedicated throw-in coach, don't they? So they should be among the best around.

    Leave a comment:


  • G-Man
    replied
    I would like players to first learn how to take a proper throw-in. My coach when I was 8 would be turning in his grave, if he is dead, at seeing what liberties these zillionaires take with the throw-in rules. And at the refs who almost always let it slide

    Leave a comment:


  • danielmak
    started a topic Tactics: throw-ins

    Tactics: throw-ins

    Watching Liverpool win a throw-in is almost always a tortuous context for me. I'd say that about 20% of the throws lead to anything positive (and here I'm just talking about sustained possession). The other 80% either lead to the defending team winning the ball or the throw making to a Liverpool player who loses it right away (often by trying to pass the ball back to the guy who took the throw). I'm currently watching Blackburn-Newcastle and realize that it's not my own hyper criticism of Liverpool but really a general problem. It seems to me that the only time that there is any sustained possession after a throw-in is when the ball is thrown back to a defender in the attacking teams end. In these instances the team that gave away the throw-in isn't too worried where the ball goes because the attacking side can't do anything in their own end.

    That's the preamble. Wolves seemed to cause Liverpool all kinds of problems (beyond losing the third round tie) every time the redhead (can't remember his name because I rarely watch wolves) took a long throw. I'm surprised more teams don't use the long throw when they are close enough to get the ball in or near the box. Again, it's not like most throw-ins lead to a true advantage. At least the long throw creates some chaos for the defending team even if such throws also rarely lead to a goal. Why don't more teams use the long throw?

    BTW I assume this topic was discussed a lot when Delap was around, but what's old is new again.
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