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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I think the industrialization of the US took more than four years. But indeed that is the more interesting part. My high school AP American History teacher agreed. For each major war, we’d spend weeks of class time, but only one day on the war itself. For each war, the answer to every question was “it was a three-part strategy....”

    That PBS documentary on WW1 is very good in the same way. Mostly about how it changed America and less about the trenches.

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  • The Awesome Berbaslug!!!
    replied
    What actually happens in World War II is less interesting than the transformation of the US from largely unpopulated rural backwater into industrial superpower in the space of about four years between 1938 and 1942. There are a bunch of lectures on the George C Marshall foundation channel on Youtube that were fascinating. There really was fuck all west of the Missisippi in the lead up to the second world war. (one steel plant) The stuff about actual battles and stuff is actually a bit dull. The war in the pacific is just horrendous attritional murderous nonsense, and island hopping gets super repetitive. also this video is a very good explanation of why the US beat Japan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9ag2x3CS9M] You don't have to watch all of it, but it is extremely hypnotic.[/url] Pearl harbour was a really terrible idea.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I plan to put off my “getting way interested in WW2” phase until I turn 50, at least.

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  • The Awesome Berbaslug!!!
    replied
    I was watching a video about Western approaches command in Liverpool and the Wrens. The thing that largely broke the back of the U-Boat arm, was a bunch of women in a room, painfully recreating every convoy attack with models, from the collated reports of the escort vessels. Essentially over time, they were able to reverse engineer the tactics of the wolf packs, and construct counter tactics. There were lots of advances in technology, and new long range planes were able to find and sink U-boats on the surface, but it was when attacks on convoys became more dangerous for the submarines than the cargo ships, that they stopped.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I recommend Palm Springs on Hulu. It’s like Groundhog Day but not.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I haven’t seen it, because I don’t have Apple + right now, but it sparked a discussion of “Dad Movies” on The Big Picture podcast that I really enjoyed and recommend.

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  • The Awesome Berbaslug!!!
    replied
    Has anyone seen Greyhound? The trailer looks super exciting, but any movie based around an escort destroyer being in mortal peril from u boats, is about as historically accurate as a cthulu film.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Originally posted by Jon View Post
    Yes, I doubt whether it'll come back to these shores now. The album that was recommended to me was not the original cast recording. It was the original album by Anais Mitchell. I think she wrote it as an album which then got turned into a musical, rather like Jesus Christ Superstar, another sung-through musical.
    It was actually a musical as far back as 2006 which Mitchell then turned in to an album in 2010. She then went back to reworking it as a musical in 2012 with director Rachel Chavkin. I think there were extensive changes along that process.

    I'm not sure but I think it was quite common to first release "concept albums" of musicals in the early seventies to test the water for them and to raise money to produce them (it being far cheaper to record an album than stage a show) and JCS might be an example of that.


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  • Uncle Ethan
    replied
    Really enjoyed a Year in the Fens - a nature diary type program. Brought back some memories.

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  • Jon
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post
    We saw it at the National Theatre in late 2018, my musicals/Greek myth obsessed younger daughter was understandably taken with it ( she went twice in the London run) and we all enjoyed the original cast recording a lot due to her constant promotion of it.

    I thought it was still running in the US but maybe not - it was a great production but a little niche, I suppose.
    Yes, I doubt whether it'll come back to these shores now. The album that was recommended to me was not the original cast recording. It was the original album by Anais Mitchell. I think she wrote it as an album which then got turned into a musical, rather like Jesus Christ Superstar, another sung-through musical.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by hobbes View Post

    I got a bit bogged down in season 7 and ran out of steam
    I’ll try to pick it up again, but it’ll never hit that first season freshness i guess.
    The thing about it is, where some of the Characters are quite stereotypical (the camp vicar for example) nothing is then made of it. None of the characters react negatively to them, or treat them any differently. And if any outsiders start, they get beaten down by the whole community.
    It’s an odd balance but I think it works ok.
    Yeah, that's kinda the point. Everyone in the town is begrudgingly accepted for who they are and protected by the community. A few times, characters point out that they protect their own, but don't want outsiders meddling.

    And then, of course, the end of the last season all of the characters go to beat the shit out of Katy's cheating boyfriend. If the show ends with that, it would be suitable. But I don't think it will end that way. They're trying to set up some genuine romantic stakes for the main characters, so they'll want to pay that off.

    It's subtly very political, I suppose. The way the Indigenous people are portrayed is unlike anything I've seen on US TV - though I'm sure there are other Canadian shows that handle it. They're not made out to be exotic or especially spiritual or any of the other typical stereotypes, but they are shown to be especially tough and maybe a bit more pissed-off. There was that whole business about how the Eagles hockey team, which is supposed to be the Reserve's team, have a handful of non-native players and they all dutifully explain how they qualify under the Indian Act. I couldn't figure out exactly what statement was being made there. Keeso played Junior hockey up to a C or maybe a B level so maybe he was just making fun of how hockey teams get ringers - there's another reference to how the hockey players hated playing teams from Michigan who had players from all over the US - and it was just about hockey. Or maybe he was saying something more about how lots of people who don't look like Natives have connections to those communities. Not really sure. But there are Indigenous people on the cast and I suspect they would have called him out if they thought it was an insult.

    And then there's the whole business with the Quebecois. Each of the main characters pronounces Quebec differently, which is kinda funny. And there's real antagonism there. Bonnie really insults Marie-Fred's accent - because she's jealous, of course - but I kind of found that shocking, really. It seemed like a genuine ethnic insult.
    Last edited by Hot Pepsi; 13-07-2020, 15:17.

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  • hobbes
    replied
    Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post
    I watched season 7 and 8 of Letterkenny. At times it’s a bit much and a few of the characters are borderline offensive stereotypes, but it’s generally hilarious.
    I got a bit bogged down in season 7 and ran out of steam
    I’ll try to pick it up again, but it’ll never hit that first season freshness i guess.
    The thing about it is, where some of the Characters are quite stereotypical (the camp vicar for example) nothing is then made of it. None of the characters react negatively to them, or treat them any differently. And if any outsiders start, they get beaten down by the whole community.
    It’s an odd balance but I think it works ok.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Just checked and it is still running on Broadway (though currently paused for C19 reasons) with the same cast we saw in London - no surprise given it won eight Tony awards last year (which I'd forgotten)!
    Last edited by Ray de Galles; 13-07-2020, 09:58.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    We saw it at the National Theatre in late 2018, my musicals/Greek myth obsessed younger daughter was understandably taken with it ( she went twice in the London run) and we all enjoyed the original cast recording a lot due to her constant promotion of it.

    I thought it was still running in the US but maybe not - it was a great production but a little niche, I suppose.
    Last edited by Ray de Galles; 13-07-2020, 08:53.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jon
    replied
    Originally posted by Ray de Galles View Post
    Sung through musicals are some of the best there are, Les Mis being one example (and the 2012 moviel which is what I presume you watched is what first introduced the show to me) while Hamilton and Hadestown are more recent ones.
    Yes, I think sung-through musicals can work really well. Ray - where did you see Hadestown? I was recommended the original album via Spotify and really loved it but I couldn't find any details as to when and where it had been on or when it might be staged in the future.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by danielmak View Post

    I really like this show. Somewhere around 7 or 8 it took a big dip but was better again after that. I think they're 9 into the series. The first few seasons were the high point. BTW, I posted about the London Irish show on Amazon Prime upthread as an adult version of Derry Girls, but after I posted I'd say it is a mix between Letterkenny and Derry Girls.
    Season 8 is the most recent season. At least that’s how it’s organized on Hulu. Each season only has six or seven episodes.

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  • danielmak
    replied
    Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post
    I watched season 7 and 8 of Letterkenny. At times it’s a bit much and a few of the characters are borderline offensive stereotypes, but it’s generally hilarious.
    I really like this show. Somewhere around 7 or 8 it took a big dip but was better again after that. I think they're 9 into the series. The first few seasons were the high point. BTW, I posted about the London Irish show on Amazon Prime upthread as an adult version of Derry Girls, but after I posted I'd say it is a mix between Letterkenny and Derry Girls.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cal Alamein
    replied
    Finished season one of INTO THE NIGHT -- beautifully ludicrous, but suspensefully fun to just let the action take place. The very diverse mix of characters kept our interest. Kudos for only having 6 episodes and keeping them at 35-40 minutes. Quite intrigued to see what is in store for season 2.

    Watching Tenenzio,


    I kept thinking this has got to be his dad, or grandad (it isn’t). Sieghardt Rupp (Esteban Rojo in FISTFUL OF DOLLARS)

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    I watched season 7 and 8 of Letterkenny. At times it’s a bit much and a few of the characters are borderline offensive stereotypes, but it’s generally hilarious.

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  • Ray de Galles
    replied
    Originally posted by Nocturnal Submission View Post
    Just out of interest, has anyone watched that Peter Crouch vehicle on BBC1? I keep on catching the last few minutes of it when I turn on to watch the news, or when I watch the recording of the news, and the few bits I've seen look, I was going to say joyless, but a it's not really that. It's sort of desperate, kill-me-now-or-get-me-out-of-here, fake joy.

    Is it really as bad as it looks?
    Like you I've only seen the odd five/ten minute snatch of it before the news. It strikes me as like The One Show without the gravitas and intellectual rigour.

    It makes Noel's House Party seem like The Ascent of Man.

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  • Levin
    replied
    Originally posted by Felicity, I guess so View Post
    Not a fan of musicals generally and would feel sung-through would be worse...but my students chose Les Parapluies de Cherbourg as the film for last year’s festival and I was blown away.
    And now I have a not unwelcome earworm. I think I prefer Les Demoiselles to Parapluies but they are both amazing films.

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  • Lang Spoon
    replied
    Christ that Eurovision film was a desperate flabby mess.

    it's a long way down from The Other Guys and Elf.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Just out of interest, has anyone watched that Peter Crouch vehicle on BBC1? I keep on catching the last few minutes of it when I turn on to watch the news, or when I watch the recording of the news, and the few bits I've seen look, I was going to say joyless, but a it's not really that. It's sort of desperate, kill-me-now-or-get-me-out-of-here, fake joy.

    Is it really as bad as it looks?

    Leave a comment:


  • Nocturnal Submission
    replied
    Originally posted by elguapo4 View Post
    The Front is a terrific under appreciated film.

    Is that the one that has a scene where we first see Zero Mostel sitting on a bed in a hotel room. The camera then turns though 360 degrees and returns to an empty bed and an open window in the background? If so, that was brilliantly shot and quite haunting.

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  • elguapo4
    replied
    The Front is a terrific under appreciated film.

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