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    The Japanese have a similar industry centred on the Edo Period, which at least lasted a couple of centuries, and the Chinese are rapidly developing a counterpart focused on the 19th and early 20th century.

    There appears to be widespread appeal for costume dramas with easily understandable "lessons".

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      I found it very confusing to read Killers of The Flower Moon because it's about rural / small town Oklahoma in the 1920s. One page would read like a cowboys / Indians / horses / western story, and then suddenly someone drives up in a Buick. It's very disorienting.

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        That's true, and westerns and samurai movies have influenced each other.

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          Indeed, including out and out remakes

          And as with Westerns, there are schools with very different foci and approaches.

          WOM, Grann would say that that disorientation was one of the principal messages of his book.

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            WW2 films are pretty numerous, it'll be interesting to see how long they continue to be made after the last people who can remember it are gone .

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              the Chinese are rapidly developing a counterpart focused on the 19th and early 20th century.
              Wikipedia lists 123 movies about Wong Fei-hung alone.

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                Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                The Japanese have a similar industry centred on the Edo Period, which at least lasted a couple of centuries, and the Chinese are rapidly developing a counterpart focused on the 19th and early 20th century.

                There appears to be widespread appeal for costume dramas with easily understandable "lessons".
                Do these films dwell on the Edo period being essentially what would happen if you applied the social structure of an ant colony to humans, and amped up the brutality.
                Last edited by The Awesome Berbaslug!!!; 19-07-2019, 22:37.

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                  Originally posted by Hot Pepsi View Post

                  That is really good. A few years old now, but I think its still on Netflix.

                  The "old west" era lasted only about 50 years, at most, but Hollywood has been making movies about it for more than 100 years and probably won't stop. I don't know if there's any other historical time and place that has yielded so much fiction.
                  Well world war II only went on for six years, but that hasn't stopped the UK film and tv industry....

                  WW2 films are pretty numerous, it'll be interesting to see how long they continue to be made after the last people who can remember it are gone .

                  hah, missed this first time around. These films aren't being made for those people though. My dad was born in six weeks into the war and his only wartime memory involves hearing US bombers flying above the clouds over mayo, on their way to the UK. Though that surely can't be true because we were so scrupulously neutral. So he's basically among the youngest people to have any kind of memory at all of the war, and he's not going to the cinema any time soon. They're being made for the Gammons born in the 20 years after the war, and the gammons in training. That churchill movie in particular is supposed to be laughable, though I suspect I won't be watching it any time soon. I did like the kings speech though, it works a lot better if you think of it as being a live action shrek movie, with Colin Firth as shrek, and geoffrey rush as Donkey.
                  Last edited by The Awesome Berbaslug!!!; 19-07-2019, 22:36.

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                    Originally posted by The Awesome Berbaslug!!! View Post

                    Do these films dwell on the Edo period being unspeakably awful, without even the hope of having your misery cut short by a bloody civil war?
                    Shockingly no (with the exception of Kurosawa)

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                      Originally posted by The Awesome Berbaslug!!! View Post
                      They're being made for the Gammons born in the 20 years after the war, and the gammons in training.
                      Today we Gammons rarely, if ever, go to the movies. The recent WW2 themed theatrical releases, like Dunkirk tend to be pitched at generations younger than us. The late forties to early sixties WW2 productions (Reach for the Sky, The Dambusters, Bridge over the River Kwai etc.) validated our parents' wartime experiences, as they were the last demographic who routinely attended the local cinema once or twice a week. By the time we were driving the industry (mid-60s - 70s), WW2 had been largely ditched. At the local flicks It was all nuclear wasteland and 'Nam. So I disagree, while people my age may regurgitate the myths, few of us are interested in reviewing either them, or that war's realities. As kids we got the former from comics and TV, and subjective versions of the latter from our relatives.
                      Last edited by Amor de Cosmos; 19-07-2019, 23:23.

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                        Family Men over 50 are the main demographic for those terrible Liam Neeson Saves his Nubile Young Daughter/Family in Peril vehicles recently. Mibees they also drag themselves to the pictures for war movies.

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                          Not enough of them to make them worth producing. Men over 45 constitute a massive 7% of the UK cinema going audience
                          Last edited by Amor de Cosmos; 19-07-2019, 23:34.

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                            Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post

                            Today we Gammons rarely, if ever, go to the movies. The recent WW2 themed theatrical releases, like Dunkirk tend to be pitched at generations younger than us. The late forties to early sixties WW2 productions (Reach for the Sky, The Dambusters, Bridge over the River Kwai etc.) validated our parents' wartime experiences, as they were the last demographic who routinely attended the local cinema once or twice a week. By the time we were driving the industry (mid-60s - 70s), WW2 had been largely ditched. At the local flicks It was all nuclear wasteland and 'Nam. So I disagree, while people my age may regurgitate the myths, few of us are interested in reviewing either them, or that war's realities. As kids we got the former from comics and TV, and subjective versions of the latter from our relatives.
                            Ah now, That quoted sentence doesn't say that everyone born in the 20 years after the war is a gammon, and the second clause implies that it is a state of mind. I take your point about the cinema. And aside from a recent flurry there was a notable drop off as the UK film industry shrank. But there's There's a hell of a lot of this stuff on UK TV, and satellite though. With careful recording of shows that clash, you can spend all your waking hours watching tv programmes about world war II on sky. I came in the other day to catch my dad taking a break from watching a long stream of UK crime dramas (and modern family) to take in 633 squadron.

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                              Whats a Gammon?

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                                A ham steak = A pink faced Englishman of a certain age

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                                  Originally posted by The Awesome Berbaslug!!! View Post
                                  Ah now, That quoted sentence doesn't say that everyone born in the 20 years after the war is a gammon, and the second clause implies that it is a state of mind.
                                  I know, I was just trying it on for size. Based on a few people I know who definitely fit the bill.

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                                    I think you're being very unfair on yourself as a gammon, Amor. Gammons are more specifically reactionary flabby faced and very red faced Englishmen, of the kind who've spent too much time in clubby bars, and who wobble their jowls while complaining about foreigners and regulations while looking like they're seconds from keeling over with a heart attack. They have dominated the vox-populi side of media coverage of Brexit, always in the audience at news shows, always being the ones chosen (and willing) to talk to our broadcast media, never shy with an ill-thought-through opinion. Just because you're of a similar age to British gammons, does not mean you are one.

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                                      Yeah, yeah.I know I'm not "that guy," but I thought I'd assume the persona for the sake of making a point. I am of the same generation, and I do have long-standing acquaintances, not friends, who fit the criteria (though maybe not as specifically as you describe it.) I know them well, and I knew them even better fifty years ago. The path most of them followed was predictable then, though a couple are a surprise. With one exception, on the infrequent occasions I see them a lot is left unsaid. But I know them, and what made them who they are, all too well.

                                      Thing is calling someone a gammon is assigning them a pejorative collective noun, something most of us rightly despise on here when it's based on race, gender, or age. Superficially (and all PCNs are superfical) I tick all the boxes for gammon, so occasionally I may as well play the part too.
                                      Last edited by Amor de Cosmos; 20-07-2019, 14:57.

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                                        I assume this one has been discussed upthread, but Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories is really, really good. It's on Netflix in the US. The gist of the story is that a guy owns a small restaurant in Tokyo that is open from midnight until 7am. There are about 5-6 regulars that appears in the episodes and then some new folks about whom the story tends to focus. It's not a fast moving show but a really thoughtful comedic drama. As I understand it, what is on Netflix is from Season 4 in Japan and listed as Season 1 here, which is a shame. It would have been nice if they would have added all 4 seasons. Also, the first episode is good but not as good as others so my recommendation is to at least do the first two.

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                                          This season of Legion is so good. Unfortunately for TonTon, it's still kinda trippy and hard to follow in places, but that's what I love most about it. Also, whoever was in charge of the music deserves an award.

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                                            YES!!

                                            https://twitter.com/dandrezner/status/1152705146494885894

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                                              Not until December though. <sigh>

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                                                Sweet.


                                                I just watched State of the Union, a series of short episodes written by Nick Hornby about a married couple in in counseling played by a Chris ODowd and Rosamund Pike. All of the episodes are just the conversations they have in a pub before they meet their counselor across the street. We never see the counselor or their sessions.

                                                The pub looks like a great place for a quiet mid afternoon chat. Its somewhere in West London but I dont know the name.

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                                                  The season finale of Big Little Lies was pretty darned satisfying, but I hope there's a third season.

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                                                    I am quite possibly the last person in the first world to have started watching The Handmaid's Tale. What's scary (and I know this is hardly an original thought) is that we are so close to that world being reality.

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