Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Movie/TV clichés

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Movie/TV clichés

    I've just had a 'madeleine' moment without the madeleine. We only watched 'Crown Court' when we were off sick from school, and we were only allowed to eat Heinz tomato soup, with a bit of bread on the side, because of us being sick and all that.

    For those who haven't a clue what the fuck I'm wittering on about.

    Comment


      Movie/TV clichés

      Vicarious Thrillseeker wrote: I've just had a 'madeleine' moment without the madeleine. We only watched 'Crown Court' when we were off sick from school, and we were only allowed to eat Heinz tomato soup, with a bit of bread on the side, because of us being sick and all that.

      For those who haven't a clue what the fuck I'm wittering on about.
      It's The Sullivans that I always associate with being sick off school. Watching it whilst eating two boiled eggs with butter mashed into the bottom of a cup- my mum's miracle cure for any off school causing maladies.

      I just came across this theme tune which has induced not so much a madeleine moment as a 'flew to France, got off the plane, went to every patisserie I could find within an hour of landing and wolfed down at least 6 tons of the bastards before being violently sick' madeleine moment.

      I was immediately transported to age 8 sitting cross legged in the school corridor (because the TV couldn't fit through the classroom door) watching the ITV Schools programme clock ticking towards 9.25am...

      Comment


        Movie/TV clichés

        Geoffrey de Ste. Croix wrote: ....two boiled eggs with butter mashed into the bottom of a cup- my mum's miracle cure for any off school causing maladies.
        Ahhhh....memories. Said concoction was imaginatively known in my household as 'egg mixed up in a cup' and was used to cure all manner of ills, ranging from a slight sniffle to full-blown bubonic plague. Lovely stuff. Did your Mum have a proper name for this GdSC?

        Comment


          Movie/TV clichés

          Coddled egg? (Or is that something else?) My mother gave us what she insisted on calling 'bouillon' - basically a cup of Oxo.

          Crown Court was the classic 'skive TV' in my memory, as well. Along with Indoor League. ITV had sick days sewn up.

          Comment


            Movie/TV clichés

            willie1foot wrote:
            Originally posted by Geoffrey de Ste. Croix
            ....two boiled eggs with butter mashed into the bottom of a cup- my mum's miracle cure for any off school causing maladies.
            Ahhhh....memories. Said concoction was imaginatively known in my household as 'egg mixed up in a cup' and was used to cure all manner of ills, ranging from a slight sniffle to full-blown bubonic plague. Lovely stuff. Did your Mum have a proper name for this GdSC?
            Ah, I’m getting all Proustian about the old egg-and-cup too. My mum called it “eggy cup”, somewhat matter-of-factly. There was also always that cut-off point when you could ask for solids without fear of being sent back to school. Neighbours was a good demarcation point, as was some dreary offering “from Pebble Mill”. I think I could probably hold down a bacon roll now… maybe some hot dogs. If you had skills – and this was rare – you could turn it around from death-bed/summon the priest, to being allowed out to play footie after tea. As I said, though, that required Brando-like acting chops.

            Comment


              Movie/TV clichés

              Known in our house as "eggy mix" - sometimes the egg had a bit of tomato chopped through too (mmmmmm!)

              Comment


                Movie/TV clichés

                In the sprit of this thread (well, this part of the thread) I had an eggy cup when I got in from the boozer last night. I went a bit vicar-for-tea, though, and dolloped the lot onto a buttery crumpet (stop it). It was good, but there was something missing. Maybe the introduction of a secondary vessel was a mistake.

                Comment


                  Movie/TV clichés

                  willie1foot wrote:
                  Originally posted by Geoffrey de Ste. Croix
                  ....two boiled eggs with butter mashed into the bottom of a cup- my mum's miracle cure for any off school causing maladies.
                  Ahhhh....memories. Said concoction was imaginatively known in my household as 'egg mixed up in a cup' and was used to cure all manner of ills, ranging from a slight sniffle to full-blown bubonic plague. Lovely stuff. Did your Mum have a proper name for this GdSC?
                  Very prosaic in our house willie- mashed eggs with butter it was called. I've just realised that this is the most boring thing I have ever written on the internet, my other 300 odd posts on WSC notwithstanding.

                  Comment


                    Movie/TV clichés

                    Geoffrey de Ste. Croix wrote:
                    Originally posted by willie1foot
                    Originally posted by Geoffrey de Ste. Croix
                    ....two boiled eggs with butter mashed into the bottom of a cup- my mum's miracle cure for any off school causing maladies.
                    Ahhhh....memories. Said concoction was imaginatively known in my household as 'egg mixed up in a cup' and was used to cure all manner of ills, ranging from a slight sniffle to full-blown bubonic plague. Lovely stuff. Did your Mum have a proper name for this GdSC?
                    Very prosaic in our house willie- mashed eggs with butter it was called. I've just realised that this is the most boring thing I have ever written on the internet, my other 300 odd posts on WSC notwithstanding.
                    You’re being too hard on yourself, man: this kind of thing is the marrow of life, the building-blocks of enlightenment, true. What more do you want?

                    Speaking of which, poetry deserves a sub-section. There are only five poets in Western Cinema, the number picks up the further east you go, until you hit Russia, then the number comes down again.

                    A love of poetry marks one as a homosexual /closet homosexual /unctuous long-scarf-wearing/blonde man-bob-sporting professor. Movie poets never look like Larkin. (Sub-clause: characters that look like Larkin will love/secretly-cry-at poetry. Alas, they will be repressed and/or married to an overbearing woman and therefore must keep their passion under lock-and-key. Only a maid "of colour"/homeless man/”special” child can unlock this love. The flying of kites/racing of street-carts/sailing of boats will feature at some point during this awakening.)

                    Moving on. Jocks who want to impress girls will try and learn a poem. This will be conducted in a constant state of agitation/exclamation and through sun-squinted eyes. They will always – always – give up by sending said tome sailing across the dorm, cursing “ you fuqing fagot." Serial-killer movies are an exception to the rule. To be a serial killer you can only know one stanza of poetry; that poet must be Blake (Shelley written in innards just doesn’t work). Stephen Fry will have been in half of these films.

                    Comment


                      Movie/TV clichés

                      I've just had a 'madeleine' moment without the madeleine. We only watched 'Crown Court' when we were off sick from school, and we were only allowed to eat Heinz tomato soup, with a bit of bread on the side, because of us being sick and all that.

                      For those who haven't a clue what the fuck I'm wittering on about.
                      Heinz cream of chicken for me. And I've just scrolled fwd to the end of that episode to confirm that Crown Court had two different theme tunes:

                      'portentous, impending drama' tune at the beginning and 'wistful, contemplative' at the end.

                      Comment


                        Movie/TV clichés

                        This thread has evolved into five Scotsmen talking about boiled eggs and soup.

                        There's a joke in there somewhere, but I'm damned if I can find it.

                        Comment


                          Movie/TV clichés

                          Ha! Ha!

                          Maybe if I add that in our house it was called 'beat-up egg'...?

                          Comment


                            Movie/TV clichés

                            [quote=Felicity, I guess so post=714570]
                            And I've just scrolled fwd to the end of that episode to confirm that Crown Court had two different theme tunes:

                            'portentous, impending drama' tune at the beginning and 'wistful, contemplative' at the end.
                            Opening theme - Janacek's Sinfonietta, 4th movement. Closing theme - 'Distant Hills' by the Simon Park Orchestra, a 'B' side to Eye Level - the theme from 'Van der Valk'.

                            Comment


                              Movie/TV clichés

                              (By some ghoulish coincidence, 'Eye Level' was on the radio as I read that...)

                              Comment


                                Movie/TV clichés

                                [quote]Vicarious Thrillseeker wrote:
                                Originally posted by Felicity, I guess so
                                And I've just scrolled fwd to the end of that episode to confirm that Crown Court had two different theme tunes:

                                'portentous, impending drama' tune at the beginning and 'wistful, contemplative' at the end.
                                Opening theme - Janacek's Sinfonietta, 4th movement. Closing theme - 'Distant Hills' by the Simon Park Orchestra, a 'B' side to Eye Level - the theme from 'Van der Valk'.
                                Those are pretty evocative 'A' and 'B' sides - like we're still in the 70s. Crown Court was indeed the apogee of Skive TV, although The Sullivans wasn't far behind.

                                I was fascinated to read about "mashed up egg and butter in a cup" which I never experienced. We were given one of a possible four Heinz varieties (tomato, chicken, mushroom, oxtail) with a piece of dry bread, if Mum was in charge. If it was my stepfather I think he used the "hangover cure" philosophy as it would be a fried egg sandwich.

                                Comment


                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                  [quote]Sits With Remote wrote:
                                  Originally posted by Vicarious Thrillseeker
                                  Originally posted by Felicity, I guess so
                                  And I've just scrolled fwd to the end of that episode to confirm that Crown Court had two different theme tunes:

                                  'portentous, impending drama' tune at the beginning and 'wistful, contemplative' at the end.
                                  Opening theme - Janacek's Sinfonietta, 4th movement. Closing theme - 'Distant Hills' by the Simon Park Orchestra, a 'B' side to Eye Level - the theme from 'Van der Valk'.
                                  Those are pretty evocative 'A' and 'B' sides - like we're still in the 70s. Crown Court was indeed the apogee of Skive TV, although The Sullivans wasn't far behind.

                                  I was fascinated to read about "mashed up egg and butter in a cup" which I never experienced. We were given one of a possible four Heinz varieties (tomato, chicken, mushroom, oxtail) with a piece of dry bread, if Mum was in charge. If it was my stepfather I think he used the "hangover cure" philosophy as it would be a fried egg sandwich.
                                  "Mushroom soup? From a chicken? Now that’s devotion for you."

                                  Comment


                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                    Oh, and most foreign films – Italian/French/Russian/Japanese/etc. – have English words at the foot of the screen illustrating what the protagonists are saying.

                                    Comment


                                      Movie/TV clichés

                                      blameless wrote: Known in our house as "eggy mix" - sometimes the egg had a bit of tomato chopped through too (mmmmmm!)
                                      Tomato? You must have come from a posh area... don't mess with a classic

                                      Comment


                                        Movie/TV clichés

                                        Felicity, I guess so wrote: Ha! Ha!

                                        Maybe if I add that in our house it was called 'beat-up egg'...?
                                        ....and you must have come from a rough area..... even the eggs weren't safe!

                                        Comment


                                          Movie/TV clichés

                                          Two involving deaths:

                                          If a character is telling another character a family story and announces that a close relative or loved one is now deceased, the other character will always say "I'm sorry." Never "Oh shit" or "That's a bummer" or even "Oh, really sorry to hear that" but always "I'm sorry".

                                          If a character dies suddenly, the first character to arrive will crouch, check the pulse, usually in the neck, then turn to all and sundry and shake their head. They never say "He's carked it" or "Oh shit he's snuffed it" let alone "He's dead" - a shake of the head will always suffice.

                                          Comment


                                            Movie/TV clichés

                                            When two people are in serious conversation, the ultimate plot-exploding revelation that one of them will just be on the verge of uttering will be spoken by another, almost always the villain of the piece, as he enters the room.

                                            Comment


                                              Movie/TV clichés

                                              Wars are affairs that end after so many years or seemingly continue with no conclusion in sight. Alien invasions or attacks on the Earth by beings from another dimension, however, who have powers or weapons that could wipe out entire species and dwarf its armies, seem to be over and defeated in the time it takes to paint your house.

                                              Comment


                                                Movie/TV clichés

                                                When hard-bitten characters smoke, the camera often moves into ultra-close-up so we see the glow as they inhale, and hear the crackle of the glowing cigarette tip.

                                                Comment


                                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                                  When someone - and it's usually a woman - finds a dead body or comes across a scene of gruesome murder, the gender of the person finding it usually helps as it needs a woman to then deliver an ear-splitting scream of horror which will be accompanied by a swift cut to a whistling kettle or the blare of a speeding train, or any object capable of a similar loud-enough noise that can replicate a woman's terrified shriek.

                                                  It's very rarely that this happens to a bloke in the same circumstances.

                                                  Comment


                                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                                    Men in American dramas will always listen stoically as a friend, spouse or ex lover delivers an analysis of their shortcomings, usually related to how emotionally stunted and dysfunctional they are, and "I don't even know you anymore". They will not interject at any point nor try to defend themselves by pointing out that they've just saved x number of lives or have a fairly demanding job that is paying for the house they are living in, actually, and they never, ever say, "oh yeh? Well what about you? Actually fuck this, I'm off for a pint.". They will just look pensive for a few moments then get on with business.

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X