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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    In Taken 2 (yeah, sorry) Liam Neeson's plans are greatly assisted by the entire group of baddies watching a game, and because it is Istanbul and to prove they are very uncivilised men who will not be missed, the game is in black and white.
    A goal will then be scored just as the weapons are pulled - the resulting gunfight/screams, etc, conveniently drowned out by mass cheering across the city.

    Said phenomenon reminds me of one of my favourite tropes (which I've doubtless already mentioned on this very thread) - the deathly scream of a victim merging into the blasting horn of a passing Kenworth, or similar vehicle. This has been a running joke between me and a couple of friends for some years.

    You had to be there really.

    Leave a comment:


  • Snake Plissken
    replied
    It's a paycheck. (Didn't Austin Powers spoof this a bit? Also Kevin "Diesel" Nash's cameo in John Wick nicely plays with this idea.) I'd insert Randalls speech about "Luke Skywalker: Communist Bastard" as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    I'm sure I've mentioned Goons and Henchmen before. I'm not sure it's a "cliche", but it's something that continuously bothers me. If there's some mastermind trying to make money - running a drugs scam or whatever - it's bizarre to me how many goons and henchmen seem to be willing to die for them. They're surely all mercenaries, so at the first sign of serious risk you'd think they'd just fuck off somewhere else rather than charge into the gunfire after seeing all their colleagues shot already.

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  • Tony C
    replied
    Similarly I may have mentioned this before but a while ago I tortured myself by sitting through 30 minutes of some truly terrible action adventure film in which the very fine actor Willem Dafoe demeaned himself by playing the treacherous vice - prez and without a hint of irony gave a henchman an instruction which ended with the words "make it look like an accident".

    * The film was 'XXX State of the Union'
    Last edited by Tony C; 14-01-2021, 20:19.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Maybe I mentioned this before, but Deutschland 89 shows its international. Whenever one character suspects another character of being a spy or otherwise undercover for a government agency, they always have to make it a mulitple choice question.

    "Who do you work for? CIA? FBI? BND? KGB? WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM ME!!!"

    Leave a comment:


  • tee rex
    replied
    Originally posted by tee rex View Post
    When hiring security goons for your nasty business (criminal or veneer-respectable) make sure they have no interest in sports, particularly soccer. Watching the game on TV is a guaranteed distraction, leading to death of guards and/or escape of hero.

    In Taken 2 (yeah, sorry) Liam Neeson's plans are greatly assisted by the entire group of baddies watching a game, and because it is Istanbul and to prove they are very uncivilised men who will not be missed, the game is in black and white.

    (Edit: forgot to add ... at a very helpful moment, there will be goalmouth action, and increased audience engagement).
    This turned up again in Snatched (Amy Schumer, Goldie Hawn, missable). South Americans this time.

    Leave a comment:


  • tee rex
    replied
    Just watched Terminator. Holds up better than many of us at the age of 36.

    Anyway, right at the end (Sarah Connor at the gas station) there is a non-ironic use of tumbleweed. Big bugger, blows across the screen, because "there's a storm coming". Got me wondering when the first piss-take use of tumbleweed was, and conversely, if it's still highlighted to add atmosphere to a scene, or would that get cut when the focus groups start sniggering?

    Leave a comment:


  • Various Artist
    replied
    I hope he did it like Kevin Costner in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves interrupting Marian and the Sheriff's wedding – i.e. leaping out of one window on the rope of sheets and crashing in spectacularly through the window below.

    Leave a comment:


  • tee rex
    replied
    This is a tired old cliche from movies and cartoons that never really happens: escaping from a high window by tying bed sheets together.

    And then it happened:

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/hea...t-of-bedsheets

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Oh God.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    Vera Alert: Vera and sidekick prepare to eat fish and chips (and peas) in the Land Rover... emergency! None eaten.
    I thought it was set in Northumberland?

    Arf arf, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    There are some very effective hypnotists around, who have a stellar success rate in helping people remember details of crimes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Vera Alert: Vera and sidekick prepare to eat fish and chips (and peas) in the Land Rover... emergency! None eaten.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    After an arrest, the suspect always needs an officer to push their head down so as not to bang it getting into the car.
    Police vans barely feature in TV or movies yet I suspect people are more likely to be chucked in one of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    After an arrest, the suspect always needs an officer to push their head down so as not to bang it getting into the car.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    The alternative with both “oh hello” and “you!” are that those lines are the end of the scene, and we don’t see the visitor. The next scene will be the body.

    Leave a comment:


  • Walt Flanagans Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post

    Or on less well scripted dramas: “You!”
    The "oh hello..." usually means the victim didn't know the murderer was a baddie, and usually results in a quick death.

    The "You!" usually means the prospective victim knows there is something afoot, and often produces the next trope of the murderer delaying the hit while they set out some explanation, and once we've got that far, more likely than not we're going to see the next trope of someone thwarting the murder (preferably someone assumed to have been killed in a previous scene).

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Originally posted by Gangster Octopus View Post
    The most common last words of a murder victim appear to be "oh, hello, what are you doing here?"...
    Or on less well scripted dramas: “You!”

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    A cliche I've seen enough times is one of the heroes meeting their guiding mentor/ oldest friend/ wise boss and telling them all about the evil plot/ scheme/ villainous activity, only for the person they trusted to say "I wish you had never told me that" before revealing they are in on the plot / scam / treachery.

    This then can go in four ways
    1) if the hero character is a minor supporting hero they get killed
    2) if the hero character is the love interest of the main character they get captured for the hero to rescue
    3) if it's the hero proper, they escape and their mentor becomes the next big bad of the movie
    4) or the hero proper is forces to kill their mentor - with the optional minor twist that they may shed a tear afterwards

    Leave a comment:


  • Gangster Octopus
    replied
    The most common last words of a murder victim appear to be "oh, hello, what are you doing here?"...

    Leave a comment:


  • gavc23
    replied
    Villains’ cars are particularly susceptible to getting a broken rear light (or tail light to use the proper vernacular) and shall be pulled over by the police and will be carrying guns, drugs, a body or all three.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Originally posted by Ginger Yellow View Post
    Watching Alien Covenant were we?
    They did it in Prometheus as well.

    I was so angry about Alien Covenant when I left the cinema. It was so, so terrible and I felt absolutely furious with what an awful, lazy, stupid film it was.

    I thought Prometheus was terrible for several reasons, but Alien Covenant was just a new level of turgid idiocy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ginger Yellow
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    We may have remarked on it before, but the tendency of space explorers to crack the seals on their helmets or their quarantine bubbles before being a hundred percent certain it's safe.
    Watching Alien Covenant were we?

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    We may have remarked on it before, but the tendency of space explorers to crack the seals on their helmets or their quarantine bubbles before being a hundred percent certain it's safe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Various Artist
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    Hypnosis is almost always successful and works very quickly.
    For persuading people to watch the Star Wars sequels?

    Leave a comment:

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