Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Movie/TV clichés

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stumpy Pepys
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Stumpy Pepys wrote: I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.
    I saw Gone Girl this weekend and I need to add it to the list. It also dawned on me that, for maximum effect, it needs to be done in a really skanky bathroom.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    G-Man wrote: Samuel L. Jackson, now there's a cliché merchant, to the point of caricature. Though whjen he drops that too-cool-for-school shtick he can be an impressive actor.
    Yes. he's good in the Pulp Fiction sequels when he shaves his afro off and wears an eye patch. Less sweary though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jah Womble
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    News reports on TV. These are always done extremely badly, even when they get real newsreaders to do them.
    Indeed, and said rolling news always seems to be on the TV in the corner of the bar - miraculously becoming super-audible as soon as the relevant story about local murder or imminent disaster/alien invasion comes up.

    Leave a comment:


  • G-Man
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    That wins the thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vulgarian Visigoth
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Hero is investigating something fishy. He's a martial-arts-savvy ex-cop or ex-special forces man who left the police department/special forces because they were all corrupt bureaucrats who didn't appreciate a maverick who gets things done. His field work finally leads to an apparently respectable but corrupt businessman.

    Hero irrupts in his office.

    Secretary springs up from her chair. 'You can't go in there. Mr Moneybags is busy'.

    Secretary runs after hero in an unsuccessful attempt to stop him.

    Hero storms into the inner sanctum. 'I'm sorry, Mr Moneybags. I told him you were busy' says her secretary in a mawkish apologetic tone.

    'It's alright, Helen. I'll handle this', says Mr Moneybags.

    'What do you want?' he asks hero. His expression has changed from condescension to a chilly stare. You know the man doesn't like to be fucked with.

    'People like you sicken me', says hero, and indeed his face shows repulsion. 'You think you can do as you please just because you have money'.

    Mr Moneybags clearly doesn't care much for moral lessons and he lets it be known with some sarcastic retort. 'Get out of here or I'll call security', he finally says, having run out of patience.

    'That won't be necessary; I'm leaving', says the hero before issuing a threat. He's clearly not scared of Mr Moneybag's money and power.

    If it's a martial arts film, some ninjas on Mr Moneybag's payroll will appear out of nowhere, ready to teach the hero a lesson. They attack hero one by one in an orderly fashion. Hero gets rid of them without breaking sweat and calmly leaves Mr Moneybag's office not without addressing an ironic one-liner to him. Mr Moneybags looks slightly startled.

    Leave a comment:


  • G-Man
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Samuel L. Jackson, now there's a cliché merchant, to the point of caricature. Though whjen he drops that too-cool-for-school shtick he can be an impressive actor.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vulgarian Visigoth
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    ian.64 wrote: It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

    J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.


    Denzil Washington: fine, noble, upstanding, John Everyman, boring.
    That's Will Smith.

    You got your black actors mixed up. Samuel L. Jackson won't be happy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slightly Brown
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Tubby Isaacs wrote:

    "They're calling the man The East End Ripper".

    Given that the original Ripper was from the East End, that would be unlikely.
    ha-ha that tickled me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tubby Isaacs
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    News reports on TV. These are always done extremely badly, even when they get real newsreaders to do them.

    Saw one on a repeat of The Bill the other day. No real newsreader.

    "They're calling the man The East End Ripper".

    Given that the original Ripper was from the East End, that would be unlikely.

    Leave a comment:


  • Slightly Brown
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Stumpy Pepys wrote: Béatrice Dalle in Betty Blue.
    Hold on, I thought Betty Blue was a five-minute short? There's more after that opening scene

    On a broad point, I love that these cliches exist: it gives you a wonderful jolt when a film bends or subverts them. That said, the "downbeat" ending itself has become something of a cliche.

    oooOh, best endings for average films:

    Leave a comment:


  • Stumpy Pepys
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Sits wrote: None specifically, but said hasty hairdressing will have begun with rough hacking at their mane with a big pair of scissors.
    Well, there's also the trope of cutting your own hair to signpost mental anguish.

    See Jodie Foster in The Accused or Béatrice Dalle in Betty Blue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reed John
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    ian.64 wrote: Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

    There are exceptions, true, but Washington seems to follow a line in well-played but humourlessly stoic leads. He's becoming a sort of Gene Hackman type, playing variations of himself with some conviction and style, but missing the flexibility of choice of roles Hackman had, especially lighter ones. When you get Washington, you get thumpingly-serious Washington and nowt else.
    Not really. He was more upbeat and jovial in that recent thing with Mark Wahlberg. It was an action film, but still.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Stumpy Pepys wrote: I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.

    See Harrison Ford in The Fugitive and Franka Potente in The Bourne Identity. Are there any more examples of this?
    None specifically, but said hasty hairdressing will have begun with rough hacking at their mane with a big pair of scissors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stumpy Pepys
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.

    See Harrison Ford in The Fugitive and Franka Potente in The Bourne Identity. Are there any more examples of this?

    Leave a comment:


  • ian.64
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

    There are exceptions, true, but Washington seems to follow a line in well-played but humourlessly stoic leads. He's becoming a sort of Gene Hackman type, playing variations of himself with some conviction and style, but missing the flexibility of choice of roles Hackman had, especially lighter ones. When you get Washington, you get thumpingly-serious Washington and nowt else.

    Leave a comment:


  • treibeis
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    A character who, mid-film, says to their lover, "I'm sorry, but I don't think I can do this anymore" always ends up shagging the person they say it to before the film ends.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Conversely, as a general rule if characters get really messy/wet but have no time to stop their adventure, it's OK. Within a few scenes all hair, clothing and make-up will be immaculate again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stumpy Pepys
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    A character who suffers any sort of malady / accident / bite / infection midway through a film will suffer a fatality by the end of it.

    Especially if they say, "Oh, don't worry it's nothing."

    Leave a comment:


  • Giggler
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Slightly Brown wrote: Whoppi Goldberg in Jumpin’ Jack Flash in an excellent example of this.
    Haha, I judge my crap typing almost exclusively against hers in that film.

    Leave a comment:


  • G-Man
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

    Leave a comment:


  • ian.64
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

    J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.


    Denzil Washington: fine, noble, upstanding, John Everyman, boring.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eggchaser
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

    J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ginger Yellow
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    The X-Men find a sex-tape and show it to Professor X who can;t understand what he's seeing. "There's Storm coming!" says Wolverine pointing at the screen.
    Reminds me of the Doug Loves Movies Leonard Maltin game topic, Into the Storm, which is movies in which Halle Berry has sex.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sits
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    A Spooks special: "Talk to me!"

    Usually met with empty static from the at-risk operative.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    Movie/TV clichés

    A sentient police car who has just quit the force to indulge in his passion for extreme motor racing tells his human cop former partner "Look, I'm re-tyred now!"

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X