Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Movie/TV clichés

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Movie/TV clichés

    WOM wrote: I'd also do a riff on that scene where the one guy offers the other guy a drink: he reaches into a desk drawer and picks up two 'rocks' glasses in one hand by putting his fingers into them while grabbing a corked whisky bottle with the other.

    My scene would involve two tough guys and the "Wanna drink?" "Yeah sure..." set up, but then he'd grab a cocktail shaker, some crushed ice, three different colourful liquors, two juices and a big fancy garnish and umbrella. It'd be the fruitiest cruise-ship drink you'd ever seen, served in one of those New Orleans hurricane glasses. And then they'd both just sip on them while discussing their fucked up life scenario.
    Beautiful, WOM. I'm laughing just picturing it.

    Comment


      Movie/TV clichés

      The one with Alec Baldwin and Meryl Streep a few years back was all right. Can't remember what it was called.

      It's Complicated, if I remember correctly.

      'I've got a bad feeling about this' or variations on that theme.

      Comment


        Movie/TV clichés

        Got a feeling I replied to a post on a page I mistakenly clicked on right now, but there you are.

        Comment


          Movie/TV clichés

          No worries. It's just nice to see you back.

          Comment


            Movie/TV clichés

            Cheers, m'colleague.

            Comment


              Movie/TV clichés

              Superheroes: no need to worry about having your heroic alter ego discovered. Simply wear a small eyemask and stupid outfit when super-heroing and no one will guess. Better still, forget the mask, just wear the costume, then don glasses in day-to-day life.

              Comment


                Movie/TV clichés

                Characters drinking cups of coffee that are clearly empty; recently expanded to include Starbucks-type containers.

                Policeman stops his car and gets out without removing key from lock.

                Woman gets out of bed after sex, grabs blanket to cover nakedness even though the only person who can see her is the guy who was in bed with her. Or woman wakes up after sex but is incongruously wearing bra and pants.

                Character answers phone and the other person explains the nature of their call in about three seconds rather than the time it would actually take. Character who answers phone repeats back what the caller has just said.

                Characters always speak in full, grammatical sentences and never trail off or interrupt each other.

                Comment


                  Movie/TV clichés

                  They tend to have the ideal witty / apt / profound fully formed reply ready, for whatever is said to them.

                  I'd quite like to see if it's possible to make TV/a movie which mimics real, unpolished speech without appearing annoyingly pretentious. May be impossible.

                  Comment


                    Movie/TV clichés

                    Mike Leigh or Ken Loach, maybe, but they belong to an old-style BBC 2 era that is unlikely to be viable in the current landscape. The Sopranos maybe occasionally had that, in the awkwardness with which the characters attempted to communicate (especially family members) but it could also sound like actors imitating the archetypes of Mafia characters, rather than creating unique individuals.

                    Comment


                      Movie/TV clichés

                      Satchmo Distel wrote: Characters drinking cups of coffee that are clearly empty; recently expanded to include Starbucks-type containers.

                      Policeman stops his car and gets out without removing key from lock.

                      Woman gets out of bed after sex, grabs blanket to cover nakedness even though the only person who can see her is the guy who was in bed with her. Or woman wakes up after sex but is incongruously wearing bra and pants.

                      Character answers phone and the other person explains the nature of their call in about three seconds rather than the time it would actually take. Character who answers phone repeats back what the caller has just said.

                      Characters always speak in full, grammatical sentences and never trail off or interrupt each other.
                      The 'fake drinking' thing really bugs me, too. The worst example lately is that rubbish liquid-Weetabix commercial where the guy's racing to work and clearly 'not' drinking whatever that slop is in the bottle he's holding. (He then, of course, winds up at a breakfast meeting where there are fruit and croissants on the table - and you can only think 'why didn't you just wait and have that instead, you plank?' But this should probably be on that other thread.)

                      As for the naked girl covering herself up, that sounds more like your wishful thinking, no?

                      Comment


                        Movie/TV clichés

                        "Who dunnit?"
                        "Not sure. But my money is on the slightly more famous actor than the other suspects who the audience recognise from other shows and only appeared for the first two minutes of the episode so clearly hasn't earned their slice of the fee yet"

                        Comment


                          Movie/TV clichés

                          Which is why the Columbo formula was so good.

                          Comment


                            Movie/TV clichés

                            Sits wrote: Superheroes: no need to worry about having your heroic alter ego discovered. Simply wear a small eyemask and stupid outfit when super-heroing and no one will guess. Better still, forget the mask, just wear the costume, then don glasses in day-to-day life.
                            http://gizmodo.com/why-supermans-lame-disguise-might-actually-work-1786063163

                            Comment


                              Movie/TV clichés

                              Or woman wakes up after sex but is incongruously wearing bra and pants.
                              This caused me some confusion as a kid.

                              Comment


                                Movie/TV clichés

                                Sits wrote: They tend to have the ideal witty / apt / profound fully formed reply ready, for whatever is said to them.

                                I'd quite like to see if it's possible to make TV/a movie which mimics real, unpolished speech without appearing annoyingly pretentious. May be impossible.
                                Robert Altman usually had a sound design in his movies that when the camera pans around a scene, you hear snatches of conversations from the people now in view, rather than just whatever the principals are saying. You end up with a patchwork overlay of dialogue, much as you may experience in a crowded pub.

                                It can be infuriating as hell when something important is barely audible, but in M*A*S*H and expecially McCabe and Mrs Miller (watch this tomorrow if you've never seen it, Julie Christie Ftw) it can be wonderful.

                                Comment


                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                  Ftw - For the wank?

                                  Comment


                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                    For the Win: I believe it means amazing to ver kids.

                                    Julie Christie is of course absolutely stone beautiful in it, and there are a couple of actors fleetingly (but not Herself as far as I remember) in the nip, but you'd have to be fair desperate to scratch a wank from this film.

                                    Comment


                                      Movie/TV clichés

                                      1. The lead character in a movie or TV drama is lumbered with an unwanted dog after its owner dies or because it was wandering.
                                      2. The character tries to shoo the dog away, shut it out of his/her house, grumbling in its general direction.
                                      3. The dog sits patiently outside the door, whining/barking and wagging its tail.
                                      4. The dog begins to follow the character everywhere he/she goes. The character is not happy about it.
                                      5. Repeat 4, character slightly less grudging.
                                      6. Repeat 5 until character and dog establish an unbreakable bond.

                                      And yes, I know dogs are really like that.

                                      Comment


                                        Movie/TV clichés

                                        Satchmo Distel wrote: Woman gets out of bed after sex, grabs blanket to cover nakedness even though the only person who can see her is the guy who was in bed with her. Or woman wakes up after sex but is incongruously wearing bra and pants.
                                        If the film is not R-rated, when the lad and the lass are lying in bed after the deed the sheet must be placed in an S-shape, covering the lad up to his waist and the lass up to her armpits. All very natural.

                                        Comment


                                          Movie/TV clichés

                                          Vulgarian Visigoth wrote:
                                          Originally posted by Satchmo Distel
                                          Woman gets out of bed after sex, grabs blanket to cover nakedness even though the only person who can see her is the guy who was in bed with her. Or woman wakes up after sex but is incongruously wearing bra and pants.
                                          If the film is not R-rated, when the lad and the lass are lying in bed after the deed the sheet must be placed in an S-shape, covering the lad up to his waist and the lass up to her armpits. All very natural.
                                          As is so often the case, there's a TV Trope for that, the Modesty Bedsheet:
                                          "Apparently, L-shaped blankets, also known as the His 'n' Hers Bedsheet, are a fad in fictionland."

                                          Comment


                                            Movie/TV clichés

                                            Also, it is almost invariably an actual sheet, isn't it? No-one in films owns a duvet, it appears.

                                            Comment


                                              Movie/TV clichés

                                              That would be too warm for hot action.

                                              Comment


                                                At Christmas, Americans only ever sing Joy to the World. They like carol singing very much, and sometimes even get a proper lantern, as if they were on a Christmas card.

                                                Comment


                                                  Characters get out of bed (sometimes from under an L-shaped sheet, see above) in the morning, and the first thing they do is go into the adjacent bathroom and brush their teeth – despite no breakfast of any sort having been consumed. I, for one, have never done this, not being in the habit of eating in my sleep; nor so far as I'm aware has anyone else I know.

                                                  The actual act of toothbrushing, meanwhile, is an implausibly neat and brisk affair, like in adverts. It takes mere seconds and is never accompanied by the slightest foaming at the mouth, spraying the mirror with white flecks or dribbling toothpaste down their shirtfront. No-one stands there for ages carefully moving an electric brush from one tooth to the next, or has to worry about it running out of charge halfway; nobody fiddles around with floss and interdental brushes, nor spends a minute gargling mouthwash with the noise of a malfunctioning washing machine. The process is completed by a single swift spit into the sink and a half-second on and off of the tap. They leave without needing to wipe their face with a towel or even rinsing their mouth out.

                                                  Then presumably they eat their breakfast.

                                                  Comment


                                                    I always eat breakfast after completing morning ablutions, (and walking the dog) and have since a child. The idea of eating as soon as I wake makes me feel slightly nauseous TBH.

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X