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    Movie/TV clichés

    Samuel L. Jackson, now there's a cliché merchant, to the point of caricature. Though whjen he drops that too-cool-for-school shtick he can be an impressive actor.

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      Movie/TV clichés

      Hero is investigating something fishy. He's a martial-arts-savvy ex-cop or ex-special forces man who left the police department/special forces because they were all corrupt bureaucrats who didn't appreciate a maverick who gets things done. His field work finally leads to an apparently respectable but corrupt businessman.

      Hero irrupts in his office.

      Secretary springs up from her chair. 'You can't go in there. Mr Moneybags is busy'.

      Secretary runs after hero in an unsuccessful attempt to stop him.

      Hero storms into the inner sanctum. 'I'm sorry, Mr Moneybags. I told him you were busy' says her secretary in a mawkish apologetic tone.

      'It's alright, Helen. I'll handle this', says Mr Moneybags.

      'What do you want?' he asks hero. His expression has changed from condescension to a chilly stare. You know the man doesn't like to be fucked with.

      'People like you sicken me', says hero, and indeed his face shows repulsion. 'You think you can do as you please just because you have money'.

      Mr Moneybags clearly doesn't care much for moral lessons and he lets it be known with some sarcastic retort. 'Get out of here or I'll call security', he finally says, having run out of patience.

      'That won't be necessary; I'm leaving', says the hero before issuing a threat. He's clearly not scared of Mr Moneybag's money and power.

      If it's a martial arts film, some ninjas on Mr Moneybag's payroll will appear out of nowhere, ready to teach the hero a lesson. They attack hero one by one in an orderly fashion. Hero gets rid of them without breaking sweat and calmly leaves Mr Moneybag's office not without addressing an ironic one-liner to him. Mr Moneybags looks slightly startled.

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        Movie/TV clichés

        That wins the thread.

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          Movie/TV clichés

          News reports on TV. These are always done extremely badly, even when they get real newsreaders to do them.
          Indeed, and said rolling news always seems to be on the TV in the corner of the bar - miraculously becoming super-audible as soon as the relevant story about local murder or imminent disaster/alien invasion comes up.

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            Movie/TV clichés

            G-Man wrote: Samuel L. Jackson, now there's a cliché merchant, to the point of caricature. Though whjen he drops that too-cool-for-school shtick he can be an impressive actor.
            Yes. he's good in the Pulp Fiction sequels when he shaves his afro off and wears an eye patch. Less sweary though.

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              Movie/TV clichés

              Stumpy Pepys wrote: I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.
              I saw Gone Girl this weekend and I need to add it to the list. It also dawned on me that, for maximum effect, it needs to be done in a really skanky bathroom.

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                Movie/TV clichés

                what about prison break, where the main character at all times is sporting a perfect #1 blade cut.

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                  Movie/TV clichés

                  Crime drama:

                  1. A mysterious death has occurred. Interviewed by the hero(ine), someone close to the victim starts talking about them in the present tense, then corrects themselves. "Philip is... was a wonderful boy."

                  2. Someone is missing in mysterious circumstances. Interviewed by the hero(ine), someone close to the missing person immediately draws suspicion on themselves by referring to the missing person in the past tense, then correcting themselves. "We were all... are all very fond of Philip."

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                    Movie/TV clichés

                    Giggler wrote: "No, of course darling, everything's FINE!"

                    The two characters then hug, but the camera focuses on the face of the character who said the above line as they stare, wide-eyed and worried. They're not fine at all. there's something very wrong here.
                    This.

                    We even discussed this in a script-writing course I went on as it is actually a look that is pretty much made up by soap writers.

                    The other cliche in soaps is when there is a party and the only regulars involved are the ones called in for that episode and the rest are extras.

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                      Movie/TV clichés

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                        Movie/TV clichés

                        ?

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                          Movie/TV clichés

                          Too cryptic? Sorry, thought someone might pick up on it. OK (deep breath) – this is a real bête noire of mine, with the added irony of there being no sodding noire in sight.

                          Teal and fucking orange.


                          It's a recent but now inescapable phenomenon where bludgeoningly unimaginative digital colour grading of movies pushes all the shadows into the teal-blue 'moonlight' end of the spectrum and all the highlights into the golden-orange look of 'magic hour', creating an entirely, impossibly bicoloured world. There's almost no genuine white or black to be found, good luck locating a genuine red, and note even the Hulk above barely looks green now, despite your average movie poster making the colours much stronger.
                          It makes my head hurt when watching almost any film, and increasingly TV shows and adverts as well, because the combination is so unnatural. It makes people look either sickly and unhealthy or blazing and oily – or, to take a particularly unfortunate example I've seen, Nicolas Cage in Knowing, literally wooden. Directors and set designers have also taken the next step of making everything on screen physically match one of these two colours, so everyone is walking around in blueish-turquoise clothes whilst filling their surroundings with implausibly high percentages of orange curtains, cushions, wall art, ringbinders, coffee cups, you name it.

                          Brilliant news for ginger-haired, blue-eyed actors, in other words, but awful for everyone else. It makes me feel bilious, and makes everything look the same. If you don't know what I'm talking about, read this – but be warned, once you've seen it, you can't unsee it, and it's everywhere. Except, mercifully and in contrast to Bored's example above, in soap operas funnily enough, which are still keen to look like 'real life'.

                          As for so much in life, I blame Michael Bay:

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                            Movie/TV clichés

                            Well if we're blaming Michael Bay for stuff, how about really long fight scenes where you can't really see what's going on and it just seems to be all noise?

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                              Movie/TV clichés

                              Or the Transformers movies, as they're known. Ba-dum-tish.

                              But yes, absolutely, I'll second you on that one.

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                                Movie/TV clichés

                                A highly successful actor, earlier:

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                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                  Patrick Thistle wrote: how about really long fight scenes where you can't really see what's going on and it just seems to be all noise?
                                  I just get angry and switch these off, or leave if possible. CGI has a lot to do with this. You can always see what's going on if something is real.

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                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                    Double post.

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                                      Movie/TV clichés

                                      Velvet Human wrote: Too cryptic? Sorry, thought someone might pick up on it. OK (deep breath) – this is a real bête noire of mine, with the added irony of there being no sodding noire in sight.

                                      Teal and fucking orange.


                                      It's a recent but now inescapable phenomenon where bludgeoningly unimaginative digital colour grading of movies pushes all the shadows into the teal-blue 'moonlight' end of the spectrum and all the highlights into the golden-orange look of 'magic hour', creating an entirely, impossibly bicoloured world. There's almost no genuine white or black to be found, good luck locating a genuine red, and note even the Hulk above barely looks green now, despite your average movie poster making the colours much stronger.
                                      It makes my head hurt when watching almost any film, and increasingly TV shows and adverts as well, because the combination is so unnatural. It makes people look either sickly and unhealthy or blazing and oily – or, to take a particularly unfortunate example I've seen, Nicolas Cage in Knowing, literally wooden. Directors and set designers have also taken the next step of making everything on screen physically match one of these two colours, so everyone is walking around in blueish-turquoise clothes whilst filling their surroundings with implausibly high percentages of orange curtains, cushions, wall art, ringbinders, coffee cups, you name it.

                                      Brilliant news for ginger-haired, blue-eyed actors, in other words, but awful for everyone else. It makes me feel bilious, and makes everything look the same. If you don't know what I'm talking about, read this – but be warned, once you've seen it, you can't unsee it, and it's everywhere. Except, mercifully and in contrast to Bored's example above, in soap operas funnily enough, which are still keen to look like 'real life'.

                                      As for so much in life, I blame Michael Bay:
                                      I mentioned the teal and orange thing with regard to Star Wars. It's totally out of control and used inappropriately in a range of films.

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                                        Movie/TV clichés

                                        You're right. Now I can't unsee it.

                                        DC's legends of tomorrow

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                                          Movie/TV clichés

                                          The dog usually survives

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                                            Movie/TV clichés

                                            Turner & Hooch is superior to K9 (the film with John Belushi in not the Dr Who sidekick) simply because it breaks that cliche.

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                                              Movie/TV clichés

                                              Oh, cheers, spoiler alert.

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                                                Movie/TV clichés

                                                I watched (ironically, OK?) Fifty Shades of Grey this weekend, and it was obvious it was going to be terrible from very early on: Ana is about to interview Grey and parks on the street right at the front and center of the skyscraper where his office is located. Ugh, so lazy of the director.

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                                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                                  Whenever characters in TV drama go to karaoke they are always infuriatingly flat, tone deaf and completely unaware of their crapness.

                                                  Sometime at real karaoke there are actually people who can hold a note. And when real people are flat at karaoke it's never as annoying as the dramatised version.

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                                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                                    I tried to find this on TV Tropes but they don't have a category.

                                                    It's a sitcom thing. Basically, some characters are getting married and the writers need roles for all the other main characters in the wedding. One of the main characters has always been ordained on the internet or soemthing and ends up taking the wedding.

                                                    The archetype for this would be Friends where Joey performed two weddings. But they did it recently on Brooklyn Nine Nine and I'm pretty sure they did it on Big Bang Theory as well.

                                                    I'm not sure what the ruling is in other countries but in the UK I think it's true that anyone can conduct a wedding service whether or not they have been ordained. The legal bit is the signing of the Register that needs to be overseen by a Registrar. Some churches have their own rules regarding who can perform weddings but that's a different issue.

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