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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    When the investigation team are being apprised the details of the crime/scenario, they probably all know quite a lot already, considering the way the knowledge is often imparted by each member of the team in turn. Spooks owned this MO for a while.

    May already have need done somewhere upthread.
    This expositional style has been really grating lately. I think worst of all on Madam Secretary, but they borrowed it from the West Wing and it's basically universal in mainstream political stuff.

    Underling 1: "There's a crisis in country 1"
    Underling 2: "Bleeding obvious geographical reference, followed by explaining some widely known current-ish political stuff"
    Underling 3: "Yes, here's some really bleeding obvious historical context "

    And what I'm doing is wondering how the Secretary of State isn't saying "Jesus fucking christ, you morons. You have jobs in the (non-Trump) state Department. If everyone doesn't know all this stuff already, you should all be fired."

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  • Snake Plissken
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Thistle View Post
    The hero and the feisty girl he is saving from baddies are running away from baddies. They stop suddenly and he snogs her, much to her surprise. This renders them invisible to the bad guys who run straight past them.

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  • Sits
    replied
    When the investigation team are being apprised the details of the crime/scenario, they probably all know quite a lot already, considering the way the knowledge is often imparted by each member of the team in turn. Spooks owned this MO for a while.

    May already have need done somewhere upthread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Felicity, I guess so
    replied
    No one ever locks their car in a film. Bugs me every time.

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  • Jah Womble
    replied
    That's generally not a problem, since everybody over the age of five seems to know how to hotwire...

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  • Ginger Yellow
    replied
    I dunno, the whole car refusing to start as the monster/villain approaches is its own cliche.

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  • tee rex
    replied
    In modern productions set in early to mid 20th century, one lie is constant: no machine ever has to warm up. In reality, cars did, televisions did, etc - all eating up valuable minutes of screen time. So they have become instantly responsive instead.

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  • Patrick Thistle
    replied
    The hero and the feisty girl he is saving from baddies are running away from baddies. They stop suddenly and he snogs her, much to her surprise. This renders them invisible to the bad guys who run straight past them.

    Leave a comment:


  • treibeis
    replied
    After Forensics have been through the crashed car at the crime scene with a fine toothcomb, put single hairs/microfibres/earwax samples into plastic sachets and then labelled everything with numbers, CID turn up, look inside the car and say, "What have we here?", before pulling out a mobile phone from the footwell/revolver from the glove compartment/chainsaw from the rear seats/torso from the boot.

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  • wittoner
    replied
    Any character that has been shopping in a supermarket must have a French loaf protruding from the top of the bag they're carrying.

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  • Mr Cogito
    replied
    Originally posted by Sits View Post
    There's an Australian mainstream drama Doctor Doctor in which one of the four main characters spent the entire latest series standing behind furniture, in a bath, cuddling a large cushion etc. it became quite fun admiring the creativity.
    Nigella's done entire series like that - well, maybe not in the bath, or pregnant, but likewise you had to admire the creativity.

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  • Sits
    replied
    When a key male character goes running, he will invariably acquire a v-shaped patch of sweat from shoulders to solar plexus. The effect will often be accentuated by his sweatshirt being grey marl.

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  • Sits
    replied
    Ha, surprisingly not, actually she was pregnant!

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  • MsD
    replied
    Did he have a priapism problem?

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  • Sits
    replied
    There's an Australian mainstream drama Doctor Doctor in which one of the four main characters spent the entire latest series standing behind furniture, in a bath, cuddling a large cushion etc. it became quite fun admiring the creativity.

    Leave a comment:


  • MsD
    replied
    Yes, and they can accommodate actors' pregnancies by writing plotlines that involve them going off somewhere, and show them from the waist up to hide the bump. In EE, Linda Carter was behind the bar during most of the pregnancy, then went off to Watford to care for her mum for a few months, which was as plausible a plot line as any, and preferable to yet another woman being knocked up by Phil Mitchell and adding to the Mitchell dynasty.

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    It obviously isn't going to be a key element to a story. But it could perfectly well punctuate a story, or be used to illustrate the life of a character - that they're not hung up and that they aren't interested in having kids, say.

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  • Hot Pepsi
    replied
    Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post
    Of course, every unexpected TV and Movie pregnancy has an arc - one that either involves wanting to get an abortion before having some pro-lifey wet dream moment where they hear a heartbeat or see a hand on an ultrasound or something, which results in the child being born to a mother who is doting rather than broadly apathetic.

    Or, on rare occasions, it leads to an abortion. But that - like a pro-lifey wet dream - is almost instantly regretted and causes massive psychological issues.

    I'm not sure I've ever seen an on-screen unwanted pregnancy that's led to a prosaic abortion and everyone just getting on with their lives as before.

    The entire media-industrial complex is basically held hostage by the pro-lifers and are too scared to show normality.
    "Getting on with their lives" doesn't leave much room for a plot. If it doesn't change the character, then there's not much point in putting it in the story.

    Obvious Child wasn't scared of the pro-lifers and showed normality.

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  • Sits
    replied
    As opposed to "Smells Like Eggs" or similar.

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  • adams house cat
    replied
    All the comely native american maidens have names like "Golden Sunset", Gentle Rain", "Breaking Wind" etc.

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  • MsD
    replied
    I’m guessing that a lot of the time it’s to accommodate the actor’s real-life pregnancy, but yes, it’s like pro-life propaganda. I can’t recall seeing any positive abortion storylines and the foetus is referred to as a ‘baby’ from the get-go.

    EastEnders are particularly bad at it, and they have a huge audience. However it’s also happened in the two French series I’ve just watched, Spiral and Call My Agent. At least in Spiral the character doesn’t transform into a doting mum.

    In CMA the Mr Unsuitable character would have driven her straight to the clinic himself.

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  • Felicity, I guess so
    replied
    Not in US cinema, no.

    There is an incredible ‘liberating’ off-screen abortion in Renoir’s Le Crime de M. Lange but like so much in that film, it’s inspired by the mood and ideas of the Front Populaire and the left wing artists working on the film

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  • San Bernardhinault
    replied
    Of course, every unexpected TV and Movie pregnancy has an arc - one that either involves wanting to get an abortion before having some pro-lifey wet dream moment where they hear a heartbeat or see a hand on an ultrasound or something, which results in the child being born to a mother who is doting rather than broadly apathetic.

    Or, on rare occasions, it leads to an abortion. But that - like a pro-lifey wet dream - is almost instantly regretted and causes massive psychological issues.

    I'm not sure I've ever seen an on-screen unwanted pregnancy that's led to a prosaic abortion and everyone just getting on with their lives as before.

    The entire media-industrial complex is basically held hostage by the pro-lifers and are too scared to show normality.

    Leave a comment:


  • ursus arctos
    replied
    "What was that you said, hun?"

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  • MsD
    replied
    Ok, well, I hope the punctuation gets fixed soon.

    Leave a comment:

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