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    Movie/TV clichés

    Do you reckon someone could write an entire screenplay using cliches and tropes?

    It would be funny if you did it in such a way that twisted the cliches.

    The X-Men find a sex-tape and show it to Professor X who can;t understand what he's seeing. "There's Storm coming!" says Wolverine pointing at the screen.

    A football boss gets off the phone and turns to his second in command. "Good news, Davy Boy, we've got Kompany!"

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      Movie/TV clichés

      Half of the great Police Squad was TV clichés ("he'll do his boxing in State Penitentiary now"); the other half was punnery and sight gags.

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        Movie/TV clichés

        I love Jongudmund's suggestion.

        Another device which just plain pisses me off. Maybe it's unreasonable and would actually be the case:

        Something momentous, sudden and massive is happening outside, such as a mushroom cloud rising on the horizon, or a vast alien spacecraft casting a huge shadow.

        An outdoor scene, people (a large number of them) are going about their daily existences when all as one, stop, turn and stare in I silent collective awe. No one fails to notice for a moment until the person next to them tugs their arm and alerts them. No one says "What the fuck is that?" or "Oh shit!" as would almost certainly be the case. Well, I would.

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          Movie/TV clichés

          G-Man's right about Police Squad, and I think the eternal daftness of the punnery and sight gags stand the test of time better than the cliche-tickling (the cop shows they'd have been taking off being before my time).

          I've noticed "tropes" (which usually just means cliches) taking off in the "discourse" (which usually just means "discussion") around culture in the last couple of years or so. Used to be a Will Self word, pretty much, but then "stores" used to be called "shops" where I'm from, and it was all fields around here before everything became iconic.

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            Movie/TV clichés

            Yesterday, The Lady I Walked To The Registry Office With watched The Thomas Crown Affair on DVD. I was in the same room, but wasn’t really paying attention to what was going on.

            At one point, Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo are having a ruck in the car and she tells him to stop the car and let her out.

            The Lady I Walked To The Registry Office With then said, “I bet she’ll get out of the car and stomp purposefully into a forest as though she’s in desperate need of a dump, and he’ll run after he as though she’s forgotten to take any paper with her” – which is exactly what happened.

            The Lady I Walked To The Registry Office With had never seen the film before, but claimed that’s always what happens when women insist that the driver stop the car to let them out. I have my doubts, but she insisted she’d seen ‘loads of films’ with similar scenes. She couldn’t actually name any, though.

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              Movie/TV clichés

              Reed John wrote:
              I can say, without any fear of contradiction, that I've never said or heard an actual human say "There's a war/storm coming" or "we've got company," except in a very literal sense.

              Come to think of it, I've never heard those used literally either. In the first case it's "I think it's going to rain," or maybe "The weather map shows a storm coming in from xyz" and it's said matter of factly, not with gravitas. For the war bit, it's just "I'm afraid this is going to turn into a real war." Or "we might end up going to war there." And "company" was a term for "visitors" or "guests" that I haven't heard anyone use in any context in about 30 years.
              I say "company" all the time, sometimes specifying "gentleman company" "female company" "Royal company" (my cat), and sometimes say "we have company" to signal danger in the vicinity, these days mostly when we are walking the chihuahuas and there's a Rottweiler trotting in from 8 o'clock.

              Then again, I'm old-fashioned.

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                Movie/TV clichés

                A sentient police car who has just quit the force to indulge in his passion for extreme motor racing tells his human cop former partner "Look, I'm re-tyred now!"

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                  Movie/TV clichés

                  A Spooks special: "Talk to me!"

                  Usually met with empty static from the at-risk operative.

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                    Movie/TV clichés

                    The X-Men find a sex-tape and show it to Professor X who can;t understand what he's seeing. "There's Storm coming!" says Wolverine pointing at the screen.
                    Reminds me of the Doug Loves Movies Leonard Maltin game topic, Into the Storm, which is movies in which Halle Berry has sex.

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                      Movie/TV clichés

                      It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

                      J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.

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                        Movie/TV clichés

                        It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

                        J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.


                        Denzil Washington: fine, noble, upstanding, John Everyman, boring.

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                          Movie/TV clichés

                          Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

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                            Movie/TV clichés

                            Slightly Brown wrote: Whoppi Goldberg in Jumpin’ Jack Flash in an excellent example of this.
                            Haha, I judge my crap typing almost exclusively against hers in that film.

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                              Movie/TV clichés

                              A character who suffers any sort of malady / accident / bite / infection midway through a film will suffer a fatality by the end of it.

                              Especially if they say, "Oh, don't worry it's nothing."

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                                Movie/TV clichés

                                Conversely, as a general rule if characters get really messy/wet but have no time to stop their adventure, it's OK. Within a few scenes all hair, clothing and make-up will be immaculate again.

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                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                  A character who, mid-film, says to their lover, "I'm sorry, but I don't think I can do this anymore" always ends up shagging the person they say it to before the film ends.

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                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                    Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

                                    There are exceptions, true, but Washington seems to follow a line in well-played but humourlessly stoic leads. He's becoming a sort of Gene Hackman type, playing variations of himself with some conviction and style, but missing the flexibility of choice of roles Hackman had, especially lighter ones. When you get Washington, you get thumpingly-serious Washington and nowt else.

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                                      Movie/TV clichés

                                      I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.

                                      See Harrison Ford in The Fugitive and Franka Potente in The Bourne Identity. Are there any more examples of this?

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                                        Movie/TV clichés

                                        Stumpy Pepys wrote: I'm going off a very small sample size here, but I've noticed that — in any sort of action film — when our heroes have to do some hasty, DIY hairdressing on themselves, in order to fashion a disguise, it always comes out looking like they've spent two hours in Vidal Sassoon.

                                        See Harrison Ford in The Fugitive and Franka Potente in The Bourne Identity. Are there any more examples of this?
                                        None specifically, but said hasty hairdressing will have begun with rough hacking at their mane with a big pair of scissors.

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                                          Movie/TV clichés

                                          ian.64 wrote: Not in Training Day nor in Flight.

                                          There are exceptions, true, but Washington seems to follow a line in well-played but humourlessly stoic leads. He's becoming a sort of Gene Hackman type, playing variations of himself with some conviction and style, but missing the flexibility of choice of roles Hackman had, especially lighter ones. When you get Washington, you get thumpingly-serious Washington and nowt else.
                                          Not really. He was more upbeat and jovial in that recent thing with Mark Wahlberg. It was an action film, but still.

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                                            Movie/TV clichés

                                            Sits wrote: None specifically, but said hasty hairdressing will have begun with rough hacking at their mane with a big pair of scissors.
                                            Well, there's also the trope of cutting your own hair to signpost mental anguish.

                                            See Jodie Foster in The Accused or Béatrice Dalle in Betty Blue.

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                                              Movie/TV clichés

                                              Stumpy Pepys wrote: Béatrice Dalle in Betty Blue.
                                              Hold on, I thought Betty Blue was a five-minute short? There's more after that opening scene

                                              On a broad point, I love that these cliches exist: it gives you a wonderful jolt when a film bends or subverts them. That said, the "downbeat" ending itself has become something of a cliche.

                                              oooOh, best endings for average films:

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                                                Movie/TV clichés

                                                News reports on TV. These are always done extremely badly, even when they get real newsreaders to do them.

                                                Saw one on a repeat of The Bill the other day. No real newsreader.

                                                "They're calling the man The East End Ripper".

                                                Given that the original Ripper was from the East End, that would be unlikely.

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                                                  Movie/TV clichés

                                                  Tubby Isaacs wrote:

                                                  "They're calling the man The East End Ripper".

                                                  Given that the original Ripper was from the East End, that would be unlikely.
                                                  ha-ha that tickled me.

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                                                    Movie/TV clichés

                                                    ian.64 wrote: It was touched on above, but there's also the typecasting element. Michael Ironside has been done.

                                                    J T Walsh? Sleazy, probably corrupt authority figure.


                                                    Denzil Washington: fine, noble, upstanding, John Everyman, boring.
                                                    That's Will Smith.

                                                    You got your black actors mixed up. Samuel L. Jackson won't be happy.

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