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    Originally posted by Jobi1 View Post

    Always the with reading in translation I guess; you have to just take it in good faith that the translator has done a faithfully good job.
    Or dive into the unfaithful ones. Saturday was International Translators' Day, and my girlfriend marked it by sharing one of her favourite Borges quotes with her friends: 'The original is not always faithful to the translation.'

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      Originally posted by Sam View Post

      Or dive into the unfaithful ones. Saturday was International Translators' Day, and my girlfriend marked it by sharing one of her favourite Borges quotes with her friends: 'The original is not always faithful to the translation.'
      Is this a double-meaning gag about translating Borges's quote, or is it just a straight up comment? I actually can't tell. Which... I suppose... is the gag, right?

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        The Borges essay on translations of the Iliad is wonderful on how the style and register (from dry reportage to flowery self consciously Epic) can be so wildly divergent to make them utterly different from each other and the source (which even knowing Greek we can never truly "know" how such things as "wine dark sea" were intended, was this a commonplace cliché barely noticed by the original audience?). Of course, I read that essay in translation.

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          Originally posted by San Bernardhinault View Post

          Is this a double-meaning gag about translating Borges's quote, or is it just a straight up comment? I actually can't tell. Which... I suppose... is the gag, right?
          No, it was just a comment, because the quote was fresh in my mind because as well as sharing it with all the translators she knows (of which there are a lot, obviously), she also sent it to me. And she didn't translate it in her message, but I did for the board.

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            Originally posted by RobW View Post
            Started my first Wodehouse this morning, Thank You, Jeeves.
            Finished, and will continue the adventures of Jeeves and Wooster after reading From Manchester With Love

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              Finished "Lonely City", then read "New York 1979" by Kathy Acker, only 60 pages long and as much as I try a d want to like Kathy Acker, I just don't get it. However, there's a great reading list at the end of the novela, which I shall be referring to for future reading.

              Just started "Ten Thousand Apologies: Fat White Family and the miracle of Failure", which I bought by mistake while browsing it in the Kindle store. It's good so far, I really like Lias Saodi's writing (recent story in The Quintus is fantastic) but was a bit taken unaware by it being written in 3rd person, but the book is co-written by Adelle Stripe, so imagine she is writing the initial sections about Saodi's family

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                Finished Strangers on a Train last night. Very good indeed. I've now started Death and the Penguin by Andrey Kurkov, which someone else read quite recently upthread, if I remember rightly.

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                  Originally posted by Sam View Post
                  Finished Strangers on a Train last night. Very good indeed. I've now started Death and the Penguin by Andrey Kurkov, which someone else read quite recently upthread, if I remember rightly.
                  That would be me. I really enjoyed it, but still not sure I'd look into the next books in the series. I'm always very wary of literary sequels. And speaking of books in series...

                  I decided the Gogol collection was a bit much to tackle in one go so am breaking it up with other things, and in my continuing attempts to make a dent in my "to be read" pile have picked up Richard Ford's The Sportswriter, which someone gave me years ago. Have to be honest I'm really not enjoying it so far. The main character seems thoroughly dislikeable (perhaps that's the point) and the language is, well, kinda racist. I'll give it a couple more chapters...

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                    Originally posted by Jobi1 View Post

                    That would be me. I really enjoyed it, but still not sure I'd look into the next books in the series. I'm always very wary of literary sequels. And speaking of books in series...
                    It's very entertaining so far. I'd missed that it was part of a series, but I wanted my pick this time to be quick and fun, and this fits the bill (I'll go for 'pun intended' there, since penguins' beaks can apparently be called bills).

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                      Halfway through Chapter 5 of The Sportswriter and I think I am going to ditch it. Ford can certainly write, but the characters are just hateful and the anachronistic references to/descriptions of Black people are so awkward. Life is too short to persevere with books you're really not enjoying.

                      Picked up a copy of Wuthering Heights straight from the source the other day while we were having a weekend away in the area. Was going to save that until later in the year but might just get stuck into that now.

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                        Definitely ditch The Sportswriter - dense and fucking unreadable, and it doesn't get any better. For some reason, I read the second one in the trilogy too, possibly thinking I was missing something because the books were so highly praised.

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                          Finished Babylon Berlin
                          Not sufficiently different from the TV version to race through it but worth the read. Dithered for a day or two but restarted Tim Moore Nul Points in the bath last night.
                          Dunno why it didn't grab me the first time, I loved his cycling books but this account of the failures at Eurovision did have me chuckling and mildly surprised at some of the early trivia about the song contest. Now he plans to visit each of the nul pointers to turn it into a travel book.

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                            Currently reading Roald Dahl books to my daughter, I though she might be a bit too young, but she absolutely loved "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and has got obsessed and asks me to re-read her favourite bits (Augustus Gloop falling in the chocolate river and the children leaving the factory). Have just started "Matilda", but I already get the impression it is a bit too grown up for her, chapters are a bit longer and most importantly, there's no chocolate and a lot of the literary references are just way too obscure for her.

                            But it's a nice feeling, Roald Dahl single handedly got me into reading at the age of 8. I remember every book I was forced to take from the library would be totally dull, then one day I borrowed the BFG and never looked back. I was worried he'd be dated, or a bit too scary, but she couldn't have been more engaged with CatCF.

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                              Finished Death and the Penguin about 24 hours ago; I've now started We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson.

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                                Originally posted by steveeeeeeeee View Post
                                Currently reading Roald Dahl books to my daughter, I though she might be a bit too young, but she absolutely loved "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and has got obsessed and asks me to re-read her favourite bits (Augustus Gloop falling in the chocolate river and the children leaving the factory). Have just started "Matilda", but I already get the impression it is a bit too grown up for her, chapters are a bit longer and most importantly, there's no chocolate and a lot of the literary references are just way too obscure for her.
                                No chocolate in Matilda? I suggest you jump straight to The Cake Scene.

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                                  Originally posted by Sam View Post
                                  I've now started We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson.
                                  'Her masterpiece', it says at the start of the edition I've got. Does anything happen at some point? I'm about 40% of the way in and very little has done so far.

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                                    OK, last night I hit the passage in the book where the twist is revealed, and my view of everything I'd read up that point did a triple pike somersault. Suddenly this is a much more interesting novel than I thought I was reading.

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                                      I'm finally reading Lonesome Dove
                                      Uncomfortable bedtime read. Not because of the casual racism and sexism but cos an 843 page brick is awkward with a weakened wrist

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                                        I have finished We Have Always Lived in the Castle, which did indeed get better once I hit what turned out to be a bit less of a twist than I first interpreted it as, but still left me ultimately a bit unsatisfied.

                                        When I go to bed in a little while I'm going to start Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife by Bart D. Ehrman. It's been a long time since I read any proper history of religion books (having done half of my degree in religious studies and comparative religion), so I'm looking forward to it.

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                                          I absolutely loved We Have Always Lived in the Castle - one of my favourite reads of the last few years. I enjoyed the way Jackson got me to sympathise completely with an objectively utterly unlikeable person.

                                          And I also like Richard Ford's Frank Bascombe books, and indeed everything else I've read by him. His masterpiece is Canada.

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                                            Finished Philip Norman's biography of Buddy Holly, and momentarily going back to reading fiction with Nightmare Alley

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                                              My long haul through Infinite Jest continues. That makes it sound like a chore, but it's far from that. It's absolutely fascinating. I'd have jacked it in ages ago if it wasn't. Despite its length it's the type of book that you can put down for days and quite easily walk back into it's world later.

                                              Meanwhile I've finished Straight Man by Richard Russo, which was OK-ish but not as interesting, or amusing, as I'd hoped. My daytime book is Peter Ackroyd's bio of William Blake, which I read about half of several years ago, but for some reason never finished. Can't think why because, like everything I've read by Ackroyd, it's well written without being flashy, and highly informative. Has anyone read his bios of Chaplin or Hitchcock? I'm curious because they're somewhat of a departure for him and I wonder what he brings to the, already considerable, library on both men. Finally I've begun re-reading E.S Turner's history of early British comics, Boys Will Be Boys. Which I thoroughly enjoyed about twenty years and will now read more critically with a prospective project in mind.

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                                                Originally posted by Amor de Cosmos View Post
                                                Finally I've begun re-reading E.S Turner's history of early British comics, Boys Will Be Boys. Which I thoroughly enjoyed about twenty years and will now read more critically with a prospective project in mind.
                                                Sounds interesting, Amor. Have you ever read Boys' Weeklies? It's an essay by George Orwell and can be found in his Inside the Whale collection. He critiques stories from The Magnet and The Gem plus the Tuppenny Bloods published by DC Thomson.

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                                                  Yes, in fact I'm staring at the file folder containing it on my desk. He critiques the upper class "public school" 2d weeklies very well, as you'd expect. However I'm not sure why but he omits the 'Halfpenny" six panel per page illustrated comics that were their more widely read working class contemporaries? Orwell did write a rather prudish essay on the Art of Donald McGill — of seaside postcard fame — at about the same time, which he considered merely "low humour." I wonder if he felt same about the Bash Street Kids?

                                                  Turner, who was more of a chronicler than critic, mentions Orwell's article and also the spluttering ire it drew from Charles Hamilton the principle writer for Magnet and Gem. Turner obviously thoroughly enjoyed recording the spat. Boys Will Be Boys is out of print (I think) but I found a second hand hard back as my old paperback had fallen apart.
                                                  Last edited by Amor de Cosmos; 14-11-2022, 23:38.

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