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    Arlott Swanton & Soul English Cricket by the historian David Kynaston and the journalist Stephen Fay, reviewed here by Richard Williams:

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/bl...d-cricket-soul

    I loved it especially for the fact that it's structured around extracts from their writing but is always comparing them. It's not half a book on Arlott and half on Swanton, and it's not strictly a dual biography but very much a critical analysis from a social history perspective, with Fay's insights as a journalist adding to Kynaston's historical framework.

    https://www.amazon.com/Arlott-Swanto.../dp/1408895374

    Williams nails it here:

    It would be easy to fall for the caricatures of the chippy liberal and the pompous snob. But Kynaston and Fay look deeper, recognising that if Swanton imagined himself to be, in the words of one exasperated England tour manager, the Lord Protector of English Cricket, while Arlott’s radio audience saw him as a poet laureate of the eternal game, they shared a devotion to its welfare which expressed itself not in a defensive conservatism but in a commitment to changes that both saw as inevitable.
    Last edited by Satchmo Distel; 01-09-2021, 10:40.

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      Originally posted by imp View Post
      my Dad, a lifelong social democrat, is also - inexplicably - a lifelong Telegraph reader. "For the sport and the sudokus. Got to know what the enemy's thinking etc. etc."
      I can actually understand his reasoning, tbh.

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        It requires a certain mindset and constitution.

        My cardiologist forbade me from reading the Wall Street Journal editorial page.

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          I'm 30 pages into Anyone but England and so far it seems remarkably current. Except maybe how central the men's team was to English life, getting the full tabloid treatment and questions on the house.

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            The chapter on England's cosiness with apartheid is still the best I have read on that topic.

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              Originally posted by Levin View Post
              I'm 30 pages into Anyone but England and so far it seems remarkably current. Except maybe how central the men's team was to English life, getting the full tabloid treatment and questions on the house.
              Which book is this? Is that the chapter title?

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                Originally posted by Satchmo Distel View Post
                The chapter on England's cosiness with apartheid is still the best I have read on that topic.
                The Scrum V rugby podcast did 4 episodes on the 74 Lions Tour, it's a decent listen.

                Rugby has a very dodgy past in their coziness with dodgy regimes.

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                  Anyone But England is the book title. Mike Marqusee. A very important book.

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                    Thanks, I've just bought the Kindle version based on the recommendations.

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                      You will definitely find it worthwhile.

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                        Originally posted by ursus arctos View Post
                        You will definitely find it worthwhile.
                        If I can ever get around to reading it.

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                          There is a lot of 'the more things change.. ' but then the book hits a run of stuff that is unlikely to happen now because the tabloids don't care about cricket any more. The more contemporary account of the spinwash series is interesting given the documentary series on YouTube.

                          But I'm posting because I've just got to a section on Yorkshire releasing a delayed report into racism that doesn't address issues originally raised. Jesus.

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