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    Thanks for the kind words Imp, very much appreciated.

    As it's a small publisher (Cambria) the promotion has fallen on me, but getting it reviewed anywhere is proving difficult with most magazines having scaled down operations at present owing to the pandemic. But I've sent a copy in to WSC, and I see from issue 401 that they've resumed book reviews, so fingers crossed they see fit to review it in an upcoming issue.

    So yeah, everyone, read my book!

    And as I said before Imp, if you'd like a review copy posting to you just send me a message.

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      Just bought this for my kindle, I've no idea when I'll find the time to read it. I've also sent you a LinkedIn request.

      Good luck with the book and getting reviews for it.

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        Thanks for the bump AE, I've just brought it for my kindle too.

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          Cheers folks, hope you find it a decent read.
          Managed to get it reviewed in the Dutch magazine Staantribune this month, but I'm still awaiting my copy so no idea how it went down with them. Nor will I have when my copy arrives given it'll be in Dutch, but still.

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            Originally posted by Uros Predic View Post
            Cheers folks, hope you find it a decent read.
            Managed to get it reviewed in the Dutch magazine Staantribune this month, but I'm still awaiting my copy so no idea how it went down with them. Nor will I have when my copy arrives given it'll be in Dutch, but still.
            We've got a couple of Dutch speakers on here who I'm sure would help. Wouter D is someone who regularly posts.

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              At the start of lockdown, I bought Eggshells, Ian Oxborrow’s account of Roy Keane’s time as Ipswich manager. Considering that it was originally released a few months after Keane left, I was expecting little more than a regurgitation of match reports, but it was much better than that. Good analysis of Keane’s failings in the job and Marcus Evans’s rapidly cooling interest as 2009/10 lurched from crisis to disappointment but also touched on things that have dogged the club to this day and arguably even before Keane’s arrival such as the lack of mental toughness/shrewdness within both club and team which saw Jim Magilton hitting a glass ceiling, incoherent planning and strategy, not to mention rank bad luck on too many occasions.

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                Harry Pearson's The Farther Corner is very good

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                  Review of Uros Predic's book.

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                    That sounds brilliant. (I mean, it sounds quite raw and intensely confessional, but it sounds like an excellent book. How do i buy a copy Uros Predic ?)


                    In other football book news it seems that both imp and I have reviewed Robert O'Connor's "Blood and Circuses" in the last few weeks.

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                      Is yours in the new WSC? Will look forward to seeing if our views converge...

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                        Yes, mine's in WSC. I struggled with the 500 word limit though, which meant that i felt I couldn't really give the book the depth of review that it merited. I saw yours yesterday and enjoyed it.

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                          imp My copy of Football's Black Pioneers arrived yesterday. I've been in constant touch with Bill Hern ever since I emailed him after we met at the Grey Horse and I'm delighted the project has been seen through. It looks fantastic.

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                            I've just finished Out of the Darkness: From Top to Rock Bottom: My Story in Football by Matt Piper with Joe Brewin.

                            Piper came through the youth teams at Leicester, and scored the last ever goal at Filbert Street. He was sold to Sunderland, where he only played 24 times in four years, but his knees were shot from the start, and he never really stood a chance. From there he turned to drink and drugs, at one point drinking two bottles of whiskey and taking 80mg of valium a day.

                            The first half is pretty standard football biography stuff - his upbringing and breaking into the first team then his move to Sunderland. The is about his struggles with alcoholism and is very honest. The stories about turning up to a funeral steaming drunk and not being able to drive the youth team minibus because he was still drunk from the night before were particularly moving.

                            After a year sober, there's a brief mention of Piper having a drink before a date, but it seems to get brushed over and no other mention of it (or any other drinking) in the rest of the book. Perhaps its because there was no more drinking, but I found it a bit odd that for a book predominately about alcoholism, the relapse plays such a small part of the story.

                            While at uni in Leicester I watched Oadby Town most weeks, and Piper played 30-odd games for them in the 2011-12 season. He was hardly trying, but was clearly so much better than anyone else on the field. I was hoping for a bit more about this period in his life, but the story seems to jump from his spell at Sporting Chance in 2010, to around 2015 when he started his football academy, and Oadby don't even get a mention.

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                              Originally posted by imp View Post
                              Thank you imp, really appreciate you reading and reviewing it.

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                                Originally posted by ad hoc View Post
                                That sounds brilliant. (I mean, it sounds quite raw and intensely confessional, but it sounds like an excellent book. How do i buy a copy?)
                                Thank you. If you want to avoid the big 'orrible corporations, it's available from Stanchion Books (though they had sold out last time I checked) and also direct from the publisher, Cambria Books.

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                                  Cheers. I will look into it

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                                    Originally posted by Uros Predic View Post

                                    Thank you. If you want to avoid the big 'orrible corporations, it's available from Stanchion Books (though they had sold out last time I checked) and also direct from the publisher, Cambria Books.
                                    I bought the kindle version. I hope you still get a slice of the pie.

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                                      Originally posted by Giggler View Post
                                      imp My copy of Football's Black Pioneers arrived yesterday. I've been in constant touch with Bill Hern ever since I emailed him after we met at the Grey Horse and I'm delighted the project has been seen through. It looks fantastic.
                                      There's a copy on its way to me - you're right, it looks very good.

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                                        I'm not writing this to complain, but I just got my latest royalty statement for Rock n Roll Soccer, and I thought it might be instructive to tell you about the economic reality - for the majority of authors - of writing football books.

                                        I was paid a 4000 pound advance - all of that (and much more) was spent on research and travel costs while I took a year to write the book.

                                        RnRS has sold just under 2,500 copies in the UK (both editions, plus e-sales). The rights for the US edition were sold to the US publisher St. Martin's Press. I wasn't consulted about this, merely told, and not told for how much. It turned out a few years later it was for a tiny amount, and my publisher forgot to write 700 quid of that amount off my advance when I finally inquired how much they'd been sold for. I've no idea how many copies it's sold in the US.

                                        So, exactly six years after publication, how much have I made? I'm still 1500 pounds short of clawing back my 4k advance - that is, I still technically owe Icon Books 1500 pounds, though they will not ask for it back (I still owe about the same amount for For Whom the Ball Rolls, but I stopped getting depressing royalty statements for that years ago). So I'm a grand and a half down on my expenses, and however much I lost by hardly doing any freelance work the year I was researching and writing the book.

                                        Thank christ I scrapped my plan to take it on a self-organised US book tour. Even without that, I calculate it cost me about 15k to write.
                                        Last edited by imp; 09-09-2020, 09:15.

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                                          That's a pretty sobering post, imp. In my whole working life - now around 47 years - I have had the good fortune to have never been unemployed and always salaried. I feel blessed. The freelance life is tough.

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                                            Our experience as a company is generally similar to imp's as an individual. We have produced stuff for a (thankfully unrepayable!) advance, with the theory of royalty streams to come. By the time the advance has earned out (and we have generally earned out our advances) the income from royalties is often very, very marginal. Only once or twice has it been anything other than a few hundred quid every quarter - at best. What's worse is that a UK publisher can "sell" the title to their US company and then the royalties we receive become our percentage of the percentage that the UK company receives - so that if we were meant to be getting, say, 50p per title sold, it often falls to 1 or 2p. Pay yourself out of the advance, because you aren't going to become rich out of royalties.

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                                              I've earned effectively beggar all from my books. Mine and my mate's theory was that he'd pay for the publication and printing process and any profit we made after that was paid back was split 50/50. I received one three-figure payment for The Forgotten Fifteen and so far I've not received a penny for Things Can Only Get Better. I didn't even receive enough for the former to cover the trip to Italy to meet the goalkeeper from the side featured in The Forgotten Fifteen.

                                              But then, I'm not a freelance writer. It's just something I did when I got home from work each evening. And given what's happened to Bury since the publication of both books, I'm proud to have simply contributed to the published history of the club.

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                                                As with Giggler, I'm in a different situation. I have written books because the process seemed more enjoyable than writing academic journal articles and I had more control over how I could write. Although the last book I wrote was not written for an academic audience, there was a scholarly element to the approach (i.e., I was advancing an argument about some issues related to topics I generally research and teach). I have never received an advance, and royalty payments pay for a pizza here and there. The last book I wrote was not with an academic press. They sent me 3 boxes of books because they tend to work with people who travel a lot or who are involved with various alternative communities and sell the books on the road. Those three boxes of books still have me in debt in terms of getting to a point where I would actually receive royalty payments. I have maybe sold 10-15 books on my own at speaking gigs that were not at bookstores. Obviously, I'm not selling my own books at bookstores. The rest I have mostly just traded with people. The past few months I have been working on a project about photozines so I often trade a book for some zines. That's cool for me because I have a full time job. The books contributed to promotions which came with pay raises. And I enjoy trading with people in general.

                                                Writing seems to be like music. There's a pyramid. At the tip of the pyramid are musicians and authors that make a lot of money. In the middle are people who can make a living but certainly aren't going to be making a ton of money. The base is where most of the musicians and authors live; they are not earning a living. If they're lucky it's a hobby that comes with some pay.
                                                Last edited by danielmak; 11-09-2020, 01:42.

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                                                  This might get more hits in the football photo thread but I'll post here given the book format. I just received Tony Cole's Home End in the mail. The book was previewed in an issue of WSC last season (can't remember which issue) and documents York City's ground during the final season or final part of a season. It's a beautiful book of black and white photography that documents the stadium (empty and full), people gathering in and around the stadium, and fans during the matches. The sequencing is very smart; it's a big book so the sequencing works well beyond how images face each other across two pages but work to build sections. The forward and intro probably could have been developed a bit more to dig deeper into the club, the stadium, and how what is/was happening at the club might be representative of other parts of England, but both do the job. Again, it's a big book so shipping to the US was more than the book itself but if you live in the UK shipping would probably be cheap. There don't seem to be a lot of photobooks dedicated to football that are well done (i.e., most seem to be coffee table books) so if you are into photography and maybe purchase other kinds of photobooks from time to time, this one would be worth your money and attention.

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                                                    Not a review, but just to pass on that Martin Westby, the man behind the two books listed here , the blog, and an app on the history of football in the city that you can follow while walking round Sheffield, died on Thursday https://www.englandsoldestfootballclubs.com/

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